Best Comparative Law Books

Here you will get Best Comparative Law Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. War Against All Puerto Ricans: Revolution and Terror in America's Colony

Author: by Nelson A Denis
Bold Type Books
English
400 pages

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The powerful, untold story of the 1950 revolution in Puerto Rico and the long history of U.S. Intervention on the island, that the New York Times says “could not be more timely.” In 1950, after over fifty years of military occupation and colonial rule, the Nationalist Party of Puerto Rico staged an unsuccessful armed insurrection against the United States.

Violence swept through the island: assassins were sent to kill President Harry Truman, gunfights roared in eight towns, police stations and post offices were burned down. In order to suppress this uprising, the US Army deployed thousands of troops and bombarded two towns, marking the first time in history that the US government bombed its own citizens.Nelson A.

Denis tells this powerful story through the controversial life of Pedro Albizu Campos, who served as the president of the Nationalist Party. A lawyer, chemical engineer, and the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard Law School, Albizu Campos was imprisoned for twenty-five years and died under mysterious circumstances.


2. Hitler's American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law

Author: by James Q. Whitman
Princeton University Press
English
224 pages

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How American race law provided a blueprint for Nazi GermanyNazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes.

In Hitler’s American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Both American citizenship and antimiscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Lawsthe Citizenship Law and the Blood Law.

Contrary to those who have insisted otherwise, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. He looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened but too harsh.

Indelibly linking American race laws to the shaping of Nazi policies in Germany, Hitler’s American Model upends the understanding of America’s influence on racist practices in the wider world.


3. The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law (Oxford Handbooks)

Author: by Mathias Reimann
Oxford University Press
English
1430 pages

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The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law provides a wide-ranging and highly diverse critical survey of comparative law at the beginning of the twenty-first century. It summarizes and evaluates a discipline that is time-honored but not easily understood in all its dimensions.

In the current eraof globalization, this discipline is more relevant than ever, both on the academic and on the practical level. The Handbook is divided into three main sections. Section I surveys how comparative law has developed and where it stands today in various parts of the world.

This includes not only traditional model jurisdictions, such as France, Germany, and the United States, but also other regions like EasternEurope, East Asia, and Latin America. Section II then discusses the major approaches to comparative law – its methods, goals, and its relationship with other fields, such as legal history, economics, and linguistics.

Finally, Section III deals with the status of comparative studies in over a dozensubject matter areas, including the major categories of private, economic, public, and criminal law. The Handbook contains forty-three chapters which are written by experts from around the world.


4. International Law in the U.S. Legal System

Author: by Curtis A. Bradley
Oxford University Press
English
376 pages

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International Law in the U.S. Legal System provides a wide-ranging overview of how international law intersects with the domestic legal system within the United States, and points out various unresolved issues and areas of controversy. Curtis Bradley covers all of the principal forms ofinternational law: treaties, decisions and orders of international institutions, customary international law, and jus cogens norms.

He also explores a number of issues that are implicated by the intersection of U.S. Law and international law, such as foreign sovereign immunity, international humanrights litigation, war powers, extradition, and extraterritoriality. This book highlights recent decisions and events relating to the topic (including decisions and events arising out of the war on terrorism), while also taking into account relevant historical materials, including materials relatingto the U.S.

Constitutional founding. Written by one of the most cited international law scholars in the United States, the book is a resource for lawyers, law students, legal scholars, and judges from around the world.


5. The Oxford Edition of Blackstone's: Commentaries on the Laws of England: Book I, II, III, and IV Pack

Author: by William Blackstone
Oxford University Press
English
1820 pages

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Oxford’s variorum edition of William Blackstone’s seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries’ development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone’s thought throughthe eight editions of Blackstone’s lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition.

Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone’s distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notesthroughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition.

In the final volume of the Commentaries Blackstone presents a comprehensive and critical overview of English criminal law and procedure, prefaced by a discussion of the philosophical and basis of the criminal justice system. His final chapter ‘On the Rise, Progress, and Gradual Improvements, of theLaws of England’ provides a fitting historical conclusion to the work as a whole.


6. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Author: by Harry R. Dammer
Cengage Learning
English
400 pages

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Offering a comprehensive analysis, bestselling COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS, 5e compares the various criminal justice systems throughout the world using six model countries: China, England, France, Germany, Japan, and Saudi Arabia. The book illustrates the different types of law and justice systems while exploring the historical, political, economic, social, and cultural influences on each system.

It examines important aspects of each type of justice system-common law, civil law, socialist law, and sacred (Islamic) law-to highlight the similarities and differences of each. Completely up to date, it provides expanded coverage of such high-profile topics as human trafficking, Internet pornography, identity theft, transnational policing, terrorism and more.


7. Poverty and Fundamental Rights: The Justification and Enforcement of Socio-economic Rights

Author: by David Bilchitz
English
298 pages
0199552169

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This book addresses the pressing issue of severe poverty and inequality, and questions why violations of socio-economic rights are treated with less urgency than violations of civil and political rights, such as the right to freedom of speech or to vote?

Socio-economic rights have been widely regarded as aspirational goals, rhetorically useful, but having few practical implications for government policy and the distribution of resources within a polity. It is not therefore surprising that socio-economic rights have been systematically neglected in the world today, with millions still lacking access to even basic shelter, food or health-care.

This book seeks to provide a sustained argument for placing renewed emphasis upon socio-economic rights in the fight against desperate poverty. It utilizes a combination of political philosophy, constitutional law, and public policy in its focus on the right to food, to housing, and to health-care.

Part I involves the development of a philosophical theory of rights that provides a common normative foundation for both civil and political rights and socio-economic rights. This theory involves developing an understanding of value that recognizes individuals have fundamental interests of differing levels of urgency.


8. The Brussels Effect: How the European Union Rules the World

Author: by Anu Bradford
English
424 pages
0190088656

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For many observers, the European Union is mired in a deep crisis. Between sluggish growth; political turmoil following a decade of austerity politics; Brexit; and the rise of Asian influence, the EU is seen as a declining power on the world stage.

Columbia Law professor Anu Bradford argues the opposite in her important new book The Brussels Effect: the EU remains an influential superpower that shapes the world in its image. By promulgating regulations that shape the international business environment, elevating standards worldwide, andleading to a notable Europeanization of many important aspects of global commerce, the EU has managed to shape policy in areas such as data privacy, consumer health and safety, environmental protection, antitrust, and online hate speech.

And in contrast to how superpowers wield their globalinfluence, the Brussels Effect – a phrase first coined by Bradford in 2012 – absolves the EU from playing a direct role in imposing standards, as market forces alone are often sufficient as multinational companies voluntarily extend the EU rule to govern their global operations.


9. International Commercial Arbitration: Three Volume Set

Author: by Gary B. Born
Wolters Kluwer
English
4250 pages

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This book looks at how differences among women have been textually represented at a variety of historical moments and in a variety of cultural contexts, including Victorian mainstream fiction, African-American mulatto novels, late twentieth-century lesbian communities, and contemporary country music.

Sororophobia designates the complex and shifting relations between women’s attempts to identify with other women and their often simultaneous desire to establish and retain difference. Michie argues for the centrality to feminism of a paradigm that moves beyond celebrations of identity and sisterhood to a more nuanced notion of women’s relations with other women which may include such uncomfortable concepts as envy, jealousy, and competition as well as more institutionalized ideas of difference such as race and class.

Chapters on literature are interspersed by “inter-chapters” on the choreography of sameness and difference among women in popular culture.