Best Eastern European Literary Criticism Books

Here you will get Best Eastern European Literary Criticism Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Captive Mind

Author: by Czeslaw Milosz
Published at: Vintage; Reissue edition (August 11, 1990)
ISBN: 978-0679728566

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The best known prose work by the winner of the 1980 Nobel Prize for Literature examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.


2. The Brothers Karamazov (Norton Critical Editions)

Author: by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company; Second edition (April 15, 2011)
ISBN: 978-0393926330

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The Second Edition of the Norton Critical Edition of The Brothers Karamazov is based on a significantly revised translation by Susan McReynolds. The text is accompanied by a detailed introduction, a pronunciation and explanation key for the novel’s main characters, and greatly revised and expanded explanatory annotations.

Contexts presents a wealth of background and source materials relating to The Brothers Karamazov, to Dostoevsky’s own experiences, to current events, and to observations on a changing society. Included are the correspondence of influential literary and social critic Vissarion Grigorievich Belinksy and the author’s letters spanning three decades as well as a selection from Dostoevsky’s Diary of a Writer in which readers may trace the origins of this novel.

Criticism offers a wide range of scholarly commentary on The Brothers Karamazov from American, Russian, and European authors, eleven of them new to the Second Edition and two of them appearing in English for the first time. Contributors include Ralph Matlaw, Valentina Vetlovskaia, Seamas O’Driscoll, William Mills Todd, Vladimir Kantor, Edward Wasiolek, Nathan Rosen, Roger B.


3. The Hedgehog and the Fox: An Essay on Tolstoy's View of History – Second Edition

Author: by Isaiah Berlin
Published at: Princeton University Press; 2nd edition (June 2, 2013)
ISBN: 978-0691156002

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“The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” This ancient Greek aphorism, preserved in a fragment from the poet Archilochus, describes the central thesis of Isaiah Berlin’s masterly essay on Leo Tolstoy and the philosophy of history, the subject of the epilogue to War and Peace.

Although there have been many interpretations of the adage, Berlin uses it to mark a fundamental distinction between human beings who are fascinated by the infinite variety of things and those who relate everything to a central, all-embracing system. Applied to Tolstoy, the saying illuminates a paradox that helps explain his philosophy of history: Tolstoy was a fox, but believed in being a hedgehog.

One of Berlin’s most celebrated works, this extraordinary essay offers profound insights about Tolstoy, historical understanding, and human psychology. This new edition features a revised text that supplants all previous versions, English translations of the many passages in foreign languages, a new foreword in which Berlin biographer Michael Ignatieff explains the enduring appeal of Berlin’s essay, and a new appendix that provides rich context, including excerpts from reviews and Berlin’s letters, as well as a startling new interpretation of Archilochus’s epigram.


4. Nonrequired Reading: Prose Pieces

Author: by Wislawa Szymborska
Published at: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First edition (October 28, 2002)
ISBN: 978-0151006601

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Wislawa Szymborska’s poems are admired around the world, and her unsparing vision, tireless wit, and deep sense of humanity are cherished by countless readers. Unknown to most of them, however, Szymborska also worked for several decades as a columnist, reviewing a wide variety of books under the unassuming title “Nonrequired Reading.”As readers of her poems would expect, the short prose pieces collected here are anything but ordinary.

Reflecting the author’s own eclectic tastes and interests, the pretexts for these ruminations range from books on wallpapering, cooking, gardening, and yoga, to more lofty volumes on opera and world literature. Unpretentious yet incisive, these charming pieces are on a par with Szymborska’s finest lyrics, tackling the same large and small questions with a wonderful curiosity.


5. The Metamorphosis (Norton Critical Editions)

Author: by Franz Kafka
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company; First edition (July 30, 2015)
ISBN: 978-0393923209

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Franz Kafka’s 1915 novella of nightmarish transformation became a worldwide classic and remains a century later one of the most widely read works of fiction in the world. This new and acclaimed translation is accompanied by possible inspirations and critical analysis of Gregor Samsa’s strange story.

This Norton Critical Edition includes: Susan Bernofsky’s acclaimed new translation, along with her Translator’s Note. Introductory materials and explanatory footnotes by Mark M.Anderson. Three illustrations. Related texts by Kafka, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Rainer Maria Rilke, among others.

Eight critical essays by Gnther Anders, Walter H. Sokel, Nina Pelikan Straus, Mark M. Anderson, Elizabeth Boa, Carolin Duttlinger, Kri Driscoll, and Dan Miron. A Chronology and a Selected Bibliography.


6. A Writer's Diary

Author: by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Published at: Northwestern University Press; Abridged edition (March 17, 2009)
ISBN: 978-0810125216

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The essential entries from Dostoevsky’s complete Diary, called his boldest experiment in literary form, are now available in this abridged edition; it is a uniquely encyclopedic forum of fictional and nonfictional genres. A Writer’s Diary began as a column in a literary journal, but by 1876 Dostoevsky was able to bring it out as a complete monthly publication with himself as an editor, publisher, and sole contributor, suspending work on The Brothers Karamazov to do so.

The Diary’s radical format was matched by the extreme range of its contents. In a single frame it incorporated an astonishing variety of material: short stories; humorous sketches; reports on sensational crimes; historical predictions; portraits of famous people; autobiographical pieces; and plans for stories, some of which were never written while others appeared later in the Diary itself.

A range of authorial and narrative voices and stances and an elaborate scheme of allusions and cross-references preserve and present Dostoevsky’s conception of his work as a literary whole. Selected from the two-volume set, this abridged edition of A Writer’s Diary appears in a single paperback volume, along with a new condensed introduction by editor Gary Saul Morson.


7. Crime and Punishment (Norton Critical Editions)

Author: by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company; Third edition (February 17, 1989)
ISBN: 978-0393956238

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Although Walker Percy named many influences on his work and critics have zeroed in on Kierkegaard in particular, no one has considered his intentional influence: the nineteenth-century Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky. In a study that revives and complicates notions of adaptation and influence, Jessica Hooten Wilson details the long career of Walker Percy.

Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the Search for Influence demonstratesthrough close reading of both writers’ works, examination of archival materials, and biographical criticismnot only how pervasive and inescapable Dostoevsky’s influence was but also how necessary it was to the distinctive strengths of Percy’s fiction.

From Dostoevsky, Percy learned how to captivate his non-Christian readership with fiction saturated by a Christian vision of reality. Not only was his method of imitation in line with this Christian faith but also the aesthetic mode and very content of his narratives centered on his knowledge of Christ.

10. The Russian Folktale by Vladimir Yakovlevich Propp (Series in Fairy-Tale Studies)

Author: by Vladimir Yakovlevich Propp
Published at: Wayne State University Press (September 12, 2012)
ISBN: 978-0814334669

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Vladimir Propp is the Russian folklore specialist most widely known outside Russia thanks to the impact of his 1928 book Morphology of the Folktale-but Morphology is only the first of Propp’s contributions to scholarship. This volume translates into English for the first time his book The Russian Folktale, which was based on a seminar on Russian folktales that Propp taught at Leningrad State University late in his life.

Edited and translated by Sibelan Forrester, this English edition contains Propp’s own text and is supplemented by notes from his students. The Russian Folktale begins with Propp’s description of the folktale’s aesthetic qualities and the history of the term; the history of folklore studies, first in Western Europe and then in Russia and the USSR; and the place of the folktale in the matrix of folk culture and folk oral creativity.

The book presents Propp’s key insight into the formulaic structure of Russian wonder tales (and less schematically than in Morphology, though in abbreviated form), and it devotes one chapter to each of the main types of Russian folktales: the wonder tale, the “novellistic” or everyday tale, the animal tale, and the cumulative tale.