Best Australia & New Zealand History Books

Here you will get Best Australia & New Zealand History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Voyagers: The Settlement of the Pacific

Author: by Nicholas Thomas
English
224 pages
1541619838

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An award-winning scholar explores the sixty-thousand-year history of the Pacific islands in this dazzling, deeply researched account. The islands of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia stretch across a huge expanse of ocean and encompass a multitude of different peoples. Starting with Captain James Cook, the earliest European explorers to visit the Pacific were astounded and perplexed to find populations thriving thousands of miles from continents.

Who were these people? From where did they come? And how were they able to reach islands dispersed over such vast tracts of ocean? In Voyagers, the distinguished anthropologist Nicholas Thomas charts the course of the seaborne migrations that populated the islands between Asia and the Americas from late prehistory onward.

Drawing on the latest research, including insights gained from genetics, linguistics, and archaeology, Thomas provides a dazzling account of these long-distance migrations, the seagoing technologies that enabled them, and the societies they left in their wake.


2. Island of the Lost: An Extraordinary Story of Survival at the Edge of the World

Author: by Joan Druett
Algonquin Books
English
304 pages

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When Dulcie Clarke picks up her fountain pen to write her first letter to her pen friend, Fran, she is unaware that their friendship will continue for decades. Both are newly-weds; Dulcie has a baby girl and Fran is expecting a baby.

But there the similarities end. Fran is a Detroit city girl enjoying modern conveniences. Dulcie is a pineapple farmer’s wife enduring the extremes of Australia. Bushfires, floods, cyclones, droughts, dingo attacks and accidents are all too common. Regardless, Dulcie’s optimism shines through, revealing her love of the land and fascination for the wild creatures that share her corner of Queensland.

Each book purchased will help support Careflight, an Australian aero-medical charity that attends emergencies, however remote. Shocking, yet heart-warming. Overwhelmingly gripping. Beth Haslam, author of the Fat Dogs and French Estates series.Wow!Goosebumps. Elizabeth Moore, author of the Someday Travels series and Top 1000 Amazon reviewer.

A truly remarkable young woman and a unique record of Australian life. Valerie Poore, author of Watery Ways. Once read, never forgotten. Victoria Twead, New York Times bestselling author of the Old Fools series. There are no words that can do this book justice.


4. The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero

Author: by Timothy Egan
Mariner Books
English
384 pages

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“An old-fashioned tale of tall talk, high ideals,and irresistible appeal … You will not read a historical thriller like this all year … [Egan] is a master storyteller.” Boston Globe Egan has a gift for sweeping narrative … And he has a journalist’s eye for the telltale detail …

This is masterly work. New York Times Book Review In this exciting and illuminating work, National Book Award winner Timothy Egan delivers a story, both rollicking and haunting, of one of the most famous Irish Americans of all time. A dashing young orator during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony for life.

But two years later he was back from the dead and in New York, instantly the most famous Irishman in America. Meagher’s rebirth included his leading the newly formed Irish Brigade in many of the fiercest battles of the Civil War.

Afterward, he tried to build a new Ireland in the wild west of Montanaa quixotic adventure that ended in the great mystery of his disappearance, which Egan resolves convincingly at last. This is marvelous stuff.Thomas F. Meagher strides onto Egan’s beautifully wrought pages just as he livedpowerfully larger than life.


5. No Place for the Weak: A True Story of Deviance, Torture and Social Cleansing (Ryan Green's True Crime)

Author: by Ryan Green
B092W6LRV1
April 18, 2021
English

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“It was a scene from the worst nightmare you’ve ever had, I don’t think any of us was prepared for what we saw.” – Snowtown officerOn 20 May 1999, the South Australian Police were called to investigate a disused bank in the unassuming town of Snowtown, in connection to the disappearance of multiple missing people.

The Police were not prepared for the chilling scene that awaited them. The officers found six barrels within the abandoned bank vault, each filled with acid and the remains of eight individuals. The smell from inside the vault was so stifling that the police required breathing equipment.

Accompanying the bodies were numerous everyday tools that pathologists would later confirm were used for prolonged torture, murder and cannibalism. The findings shocked Australia to its core, which deepened still when it was revealed that the torture and murders were committed by not one, but a group of killers.

The four men, led by John Bunting, targeted paedophiles, homosexuals, addicts or the weak’ in an attempt to cleanse society. No Place for the Weak is a chilling account of the Snowtown Murders’ (AKA: Bodies in Barrels Murders’), and one of the most disturbing true crime stories in Australia’s history.


6. Farther Than Any Man: The Rise and Fall of Captain James Cook

Author: by Martin Dugard

‎ B0031OQ0K6
September 13, 2001
English

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James Cook never laid eyes on the sea until he was in his teens. He then began an extraordinary rise from farmboy outsider to the hallowed rank of captain of the Royal Navy, leading three historic journeys that would forever link his name with fearless exploration (and inspire pop-culture heroes like Captain Hook and Captain James T.Kirk).

In Farther Than Any Man, noted modern-day adventurer Martin Dugard strips away the myth of Cook and instead portrays a complex, conflicted man of tremendous ambition (at times to a fault), intellect (though Cook was routinely underestimated) and sheer hardheadedness.

When Great Britain announced a major circumnavigation in 1768 – a mission cloaked in science, but aimed at the pursuit of world power – it came as a political surprise that James Cook was given command. Cook’s surveying skills had contributed to the British victory over France in the Seven Years’ War in 1763, but no commoner had ever commanded a Royal Navy vessel.

Endeavor’s stunning three-year journey changed the face of modern exploration, charting the vast Pacific waters, the eastern coasts of New Zealand and Australia, and making landfall in Tahiti, Tierra del Fuego, and Rio de Janeiro. After returning home a hero, Cook yearned to get back to sea.


7. Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before

Author: by Tony Horwitz
Picador
English
496 pages

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In an exhilarating tale of historic adventure, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Confederates in the Attic retraces the voyages of Captain James Cook, the Yorkshire farm boy who drew the map of the modern world Captain James Cook’s three epic journeys in the 18th century were the last great voyages of discovery.

His ships sailed 150,000 miles, from the Artic to the Antarctic, from Tasmania to Oregon, from Easter Island to Siberia. When Cook set off for the Pacific in 1768, a third of the globe remained blank. By the time he died in Hawaii in 1779, the map of the world was substantially complete.

Tony Horwitz vividly recounts Cook’s voyages and the exotic scenes the captain encountered: tropical orgies, taboo rituals, cannibal feasts, human sacrifice. He also relives Cook’s adventures by following in the captain’s wake to places such as Tahiti, Savage Island, and the Great Barrier Reef to discover Cook’s embattled legacy in the present day.

Signing on as a working crewman aboard a replica of Cook’s vessel, Horwitz experiences the thrill and terror of sailing a tall ship. He also explores Cook the man: an impoverished farmboy who broke through the barriers of his class and time to become the greatest navigator in British history.


8. The Songlines (Penguin Classics)

Author: by Bruce Chatwin
Penguin Classics
English
320 pages

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For its twenty-fifth anniversary, a new edition of Bruce Chatwin’s classic work with a new introduction by Rory StewartPart adventure, part novel of ideas, part spiritual autobiography, The Songlines is one of Bruce Chatwin’s most famous books. Set in the desolate lands of the Australian Outback, it tells the story of Chatwin’s search for the source and meaning of the ancient “dreaming tracks” of the Aboriginesthe labyrinth of invisible pathways by which their ancestors “sang” the world into existence.

This singular book, which was a New York Times bestseller when it was published in 1987, engages all of Chatwin’s lifelong passions, including his obsession with travel, his interest in the nomadic way of life, and his hunger to understand man’s origins and nature.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


9. Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded: August 27, 1883

Author: by Simon Winchester
Harper Perennial
English
416 pages

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The bestselling author of The Professor and the Madman and The Map That Changed the World examines the enduring and world-changing effects of the catastrophic eruption off the coast of Java of the earth’s most dangerous volcano – Krakatoa. The legendary annihilation in 1883 of the volcano-island of Krakatoa – the name has since become a byword for a cataclysmic disaster – was followed by an immense tsunami that killed nearly forty thousand people.

Beyond the purely physical horrors of an event that has only very recently been properly understood, the eruption changed the world in more ways than could possibly be imagined. Dust swirled round die planet for years, causing temperatures to plummet and sunsets to turn vivid with lurid and unsettling displays of light.

The effects of the immense waves were felt as far away as France. Barometers in Bogot and Washington, D.C., went haywire. Bodies were washed up in Zanzibar. The sound of the island’s destruction was heard in Australia and India and on islands thousands of miles away.

10. Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence

Author: by Doris Pilkington
English
160 pages
0702233552

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This extraordinary story of courage and faith is based on the actual experiences of three girls who fled from the repressive life of Moore River Native Settlement, following along the rabbit-proof fence back to their homelands. Assimilationist policy dictated that these girls be taken from their kin and their homes in order to be made white.

Settlement life was unbearable with its chains and padlocks, barred windows, hard cold beds, and horrible food. Solitary confinement was doled out as regular punishment. The girls were not even allowed to speak their language. Of all the journeys made since white people set foot on Australian soil, the journey made by these girls born of Aboriginal mothers and white fathers speaks something to everyone.

11. Where Song Began: Australia's Birds and How They Changed the World

Author: by Tim Low
Yale University Press
English
424 pages

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An authoritative and entertaining exploration of Australia’s distinctive birds and their unheralded role in global evolution Renowned for its gallery of unusual mammals, Australia is also a land of extraordinary birds. But unlike the mammals, the birds of Australia flew beyond the continent’s boundaries and around the globe many millions of years ago.

This eye-opening book tells the dynamic but little-known story of how Australia provided the world with songbirds and parrots, among other bird groups, why Australian birds wield surprising ecological power, how Australia became a major evolutionary center, and why scientific biases have hindered recognition of these discoveries.

From violent, swooping magpies to tool-making cockatoos, Australia’s birds are strikingly different from birds of other landsoften more intelligent and aggressive, often larger and longer-lived. Tim Low, a renowned biologist with a rare storytelling gift, here presents the amazing evolutionary history of Australia’s birds.

12. The Fatal Shore

Author: by Robert Hughes
B003ATPQ8E
Vintage Digital
February 23, 2010

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An award-winning epic on the birth of AustraliaIn 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonise Australia. Documenting the brutal transportation of men, women and children out of Georgian Britain into a horrific penal system which was to be the precursor to the Gulag and was the origin of Australia, The Fatal Shore is the definitive, masterfully written narrative that has given its true history to Australia.’A unique phantasmagoria of crime and punishment, which combines the shadowy terrors of Goya with the tumescent life of Dickens’ Times

13. Farmers or Hunter-gatherers?: The Dark Emu Debate

Author: by Peter Sutton
B097Q9NPG2
June 21, 2021
English

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An authoritative study of pre-colonial Australia that dismantles and reframes popular narratives of First Nations land management and food production. Australians’ understanding of Aboriginal society prior to the British invasion from 1788 has been transformed since the publication of Bruce Pascoe’s Dark Emu in 2014.

It argued that classical Aboriginal society was more sophisticated than Australians had been led to believe because it resembled more closely the farming communities of Europe. In Farmers or Hunter-gatherers? Peter Sutton and Keryn Walshe ask why Australians have been so receptive to the notion that farming represents an advance from hunting and gathering.

Drawing on the knowledge of Aboriginal elders, previously not included within this discussion, and decades of anthropological scholarship, Sutton and Walshe provide extensive evidence to support their argument that classical Aboriginal society was a hunter-gatherer society and as sophisticated as the traditional European farming methods.