Best Modernism Literary Criticism Books

Here you will get Best Modernism Literary Criticism Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. How to Read a Poem: And Fall in Love with Poetry (Harvest Book)

Author: by Edward Hirsch
B004KZOWEQ
Mariner Books
March 22, 1999

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“Read a poem to yourself in the middle of the night. Turn on a single lamp and read it while you’re alone in an otherwise dark room or while someone sleeps next to you. Say it over to yourself in a place where silence reigns and the din of culturethe constant buzzing noise that surrounds youhas momentarily stopped.

This poem has come from a great distance to find you.” So begins this astonishing book by one of our leading poets and critics. In an unprecedented exploration of the genre, Hirsch writes about what poetry is, why it matters, and how we can open up our imaginations so that its messagewhich is of vital importance in day-to-day lifecan reach us and make a difference.

For Hirsch, poetry is not just a part of life, it is life, and expresses like no other art our most sublime emotions. In a marvelous reading of world poetry, including verse by such poets as Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Pablo Neruda, William Wordsworth, Sylvia Plath, Charles Baudelaire, and many more, Hirsch discovers the meaning of their words and ideas and brings their sublime message home into our hearts.


2. The Magic Mountain

Author: by Thomas Mann
0679772871
Vintage
English

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In this dizzyingly rich novel of ideas, Mann uses a sanatorium in the Swiss Alps-a community devoted exclusively to sickness-as a microcosm for Europe, which in the years before 1914 was already exhibiting the first symptoms of its own terminal irrationality.

The Magic Mountain is a monumental work of erudition and irony, sexual tension and intellectual ferment, a book that pulses with life in the midst of death.


3. The Portable Dorothy Parker (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Author: by Dorothy Parker
Penguin Classics
English
656 pages

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The second revision in sixty years, this sublime collection ranges over the verse, stories, essays, and journalism of one of the twentieth century’s most quotable authors. In this new twenty-first-century edition, devoted admirers will be sure to find their favorite verse and stories.

But a variety of fresh material has also been added to create a fuller, more authentic picture of her life’s work. At the heart of her serious work lie her political writings dealing with race, labor, and international politics. “A Dorothy Parker Sampler” blends the sublime and the silly with the terrifying, a sort of tasting menu of verse, stories, essays, political journalism, a speech on writing, plus a catchy off-the-cuff rhyme she never thought to write down.

The introduction of two new sections is intended to provide the richest possible sense of Parker herself. “Self-Portrait” reprints an interview she did in 1956 with The Paris Review, part of a famed ongoing series of conversations (“Writers at Work”) conducted with the best of twentieth-century writers.


4. The Saddest Words: William Faulkner's Civil War

Author: by Michael Gorra
Liveright
English
448 pages

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A New York Times Notable Book of 2020How do we read William Faulkner in the twenty-first century? Asks Michael Gorra, in this reconsideration of Faulkner’s life and legacy. William Faulkner, one of America’s most iconic writers, is an author who defies easy interpretation.

Born in 1897 in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote such classic novels as Absolom, Absolom! And The Sound and The Fury, creating in Yoknapatawpha county one of the most memorable gallery of characters ever assembled in American literature. Yet, as acclaimed literary critic Michael Gorra explains, Faulkner has sustained justified criticism for his failures of racial nuancehis ventriloquism of black characters and his rendering of race relations in a largely unreconstructed Southdemanding that we reevaluate the Nobel laureate’s life and legacy in the twenty-first century, as we reexamine the junctures of race and literature in works that once rested firmly in the American canon.

Interweaving biography, literary criticism, and rich travelogue, The Saddest Words argues that even despite these contradictionsand perhaps because of themWilliam Faulkner still needs to be read, and even more, remains central to understanding the contradictions inherent in the American experience itself.


5. The Story of the Stone, or The Dream of the Red Chamber, Vol. 1: The Golden Days

Author: by Cao Xueqin
Penguin Classics
English

‎ 540 pages

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The Story of the Stone (c. 1760), also known by the title of The Dream of the Red Chamber, is the great novel of manners in Chinese literature. Divided into five volumes, The Story of the Stone charts the glory and decline of the illustrious Jia family.

This novel re-creates the ritualized hurly-burly of Chinese family life that would otherwise be lost and infuses it with affirming Buddhist belief. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


6. Joy: 100 Poems

Author: by Christian Wiman
Yale University Press
English
232 pages

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One hundred of the most evocative modern poems on joy, selected by an award-winning contemporary poetBursting with energy and surprising locutions…. Even the most familiar poets seem somehow new within the context of Joy. David Skeel, Wall Street Journal Wiman takes readers through the ostensible ordinariness of life and reveals the extraordinary.

Adrianna Smith, The Atlantic Christian Wiman, a poet known for his meditations on mortality, has long been fascinated by joy and by its relative absence in modern literature. Why is joy so resistant to language? How has it become so suspect in our times?

Manipulated by advertisers, religious leaders, and politicians, joy can seem disquieting, even offensive. How does one speak of joy amid such ubiquitous injustice and suffering in the world? In this revelatory anthology, Wiman takes readers on a profound and surprising journey through some of the most underexplored terrain in contemporary life.

Rather than define joy for readers, he wants them to experience it. Ranging from Emily Dickinson to Mahmoud Darwish and from Sylvia Plath to Wendell Berry, he brings together diverse and provocative works as a kind of counter to the old, modernist maxim light writes whiteno agony, no art.


7. Forty Stories (Vintage Classics)

Author: by Anton Chekhov
Vintage
English
384 pages

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If any writer can be said to have invented the modern short story, it is Anton Chekhov. It is not just that Chekhov democratized this art form; more than that, he changed the thrust of short fiction from relating to revealing.

And what marvelous and unbearable things are revealed in these Forty Stories. The abashed happiness of a woman in the presence of the husband who abandoned her years before. The obsequious terror of the official who accidentally sneezes on a general.

The poignant astonishment of an aging Don Juan overtaken by love. Spanning the entirety of Chekhov’s career and including such masterpieces as “Surgery,” “The Huntsman,” “Anyuta,” “Sleepyhead,” “The Lady With the Pet Dog,” and “The Bishop,” this collection manages to be amusing, dazzling, and supremely movingoften within a single page.


8. Burning Man: The Trials of D. H. Lawrence

Author: by Frances Wilson
English
512 pages
0374282250

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An electrifying, revelatory new biography of D.H. Lawrence, with a focus on his difficult middle yearsNever trust the teller, wrote D.H. Lawrence, trust the tale. Everyone who knew him told stories about Lawrence, and Lawrence told stories about everyone he knew.

He also told stories about himself, again and again: a pioneer of autofiction, no writer before Lawrence had made so permeable the border between life and literature. In Burning Man: The Trials of D.H. Lawrence, acclaimed biographer Frances Wilson tells a new story about the author, focusing on his decade of superhuman writing and travel between 1915, when The Rainbow was suppressed following an obscenity trial, and 1925, when he was diagnosed with tuberculosis.

Taking after Lawrence’s own literary model, Dante, and adopting the structure of The Divine Comedy, Burning Man is a distinctly Lawrentian book, one that pursues Lawrence around the globe and reflects his life of wild allegory. Eschewing the confines of traditional biography, it offers a triptych of lesser-known episodes drawn from lesser-known sources, including tales of Lawrence as told by his friends in letters, memoirs, and diaries.


9. The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Present

Author: by Eric Kandel
Random House
English
636 pages

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A brilliant book by Nobel Prize winner Eric R. Kandel, The Age of Insight takes us to Vienna 1900, where leaders in science, medicine, and art began a revolution that changed forever how we think about the human mindour conscious and unconscious thoughts and emotionsand how mind and brain relate to art.

At the turn of the century, Vienna was the cultural capital of Europe. Artists and scientists met in glittering salons, where they freely exchanged ideas that led to revolutionary breakthroughs in psychology, brain science, literature, and art. Kandel takes us into the world of Vienna to trace, in rich and rewarding detail, the ideas and advances made then, and their enduring influence today.

The Vienna School of Medicine led the way with its realization that truth lies hidden beneath the surface. That principle infused Viennese culture and strongly influenced the other pioneers of Vienna 1900. Sigmund Freud shocked the world with his insights into how our everyday unconscious aggressive and erotic desires are repressed and disguised in symbols, dreams, and behavior.

10. To the Lighthouse (Annotated)

Author: by Virginia Woolf
B004TBWFAO
Mariner Books
August 1, 2005

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Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is one of her greatest literary achievements and among the most influential novels of the twentieth century. The serene and maternal Mrs. Ramsay, the tragic yet absurd Mr. Ramsay, and their children and assorted guests are on holiday on the Isle of Skye.

From the seemingly trivial postponement of a visit to a nearby lighthouse, Woolf constructs a remarkable, moving examination of the complex tensions and allegiances of family life and the conflict between men and women.

11. The Penguin Book of the Prose Poem: From Baudelaire to Anne Carson

Author: by Jeremy Noel-Tod
English
480 pages
0141984562

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An essential anthology that puts contemporary geniuses Eileen Myles and Margaret Atwood in conversation with literary classics Charles Baudelaire and Oscar Wilde about the liberating and unique combination of poetry and proseA Penguin Classic The prose poem has proven one of the most innovative and versatile poetic forms of recent years.

In the century-and-a-half since Charles Baudelaire, Emma Lazarus, Oscar Wilde and Ivan Turgenev spread the notion of a new kind of poetry, this “genre with an oxymoron for a name” has attracted many of our most beloved writers. Yet, even now, this peculiarly rich and expansive form is still misunderstood and overlooked.

Here, Jeremy Noel-Tod reconstructs the history of the prose poem for us by selecting the essential pieces of writing, covering a greater chronological sweep and international range than any previous anthology of its kind. Noel-Tod even calls it “an alternative history of modern poetry.” In The Penguin Book of the Prose Poem, Patricia Lockwood and Claudia Rankine rub shoulders with Margaret Atwood and Adrienne Rich; Allen Ginsberg and Gertrude Stein appear with Lu Xun and Jorge Luis; Czeslaw Milosz sits just pages from Eileen Myles.

12. ASPECTS OF THE NOVEL

Author: by E.M. Forster
Mariner Books
English
192 pages

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E.M.Forster’s guide sparkles with wit and insight for contemporary writers and readers. With lively language and excerpts from well-known classics, Forster (author of A Passage to India, Howards End, and A Room With a View) takes on the seven elements vital to a novel: story, people, plot, fantasy, prophecy, pattern, and rhythm.

He not only defines and explains such terms as round versus flat characters (and why both are needed for an effective novel), but also provides examples of writing from such literary greats as Dickens and Austen. Forster’s original commentary illuminates and entertains without lapsing into complicated, scholarly rhetoric, coming together in a key volume on writing.”Forster’s casual and wittily acute guidance…

Transmutes the dull stuff of He-Said and She-Said into characters, stories, and intimations of truth.”????Harper’s

13. James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study

Author: by Stuart Gilbert
Vintage
English
430 pages

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With the passing of each year, Ulysses receives wider recognition and greater acclaim as a modern literary classic. To comprehend Joyce’s masterpiece fully, to gain insight into its significance and structure, the serious reader will find this analytical and systematic guide invaluable.

In this exegesis, written under Joyce’s supervision, Stuart Gilbert presents a work that is at once scholarly, authoritative and stimulating.