Best Guatemala History Books

Here you will get Best Guatemala History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Blindfold's Eyes: My Journey from Torture to Truth

Author: by Dianna Ortiz
Published at: Orbis Books (September 23, 2004)
ISBN: 978-1570755637

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The searing memoir of an American nun abducted and tortured in Guatemala, Whose ongoing search for healing and justice shows that the human spirit is a force stronger than violence and fear. Even more timely now for its insights into the aftermath of torture.


2. I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala

Author: by Rigoberta Menchu
Published at: Verso; Second Edition (January 12, 2010)
ISBN: 978-1844674183

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Now a global bestseller, the remarkable life of Rigoberta Mench, a Guatemalan peasant woman, reflects on the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America. Mench suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military.

She learned Spanish and turned to catechistic work as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. Mench vividly conveys the traditional beliefs of her community and her personal response to feminist and socialist ideas. Above all, these pages are illuminated by the enduring courage and passionate sense of justice of an extraordinary woman.


3. Bitter Fruit: The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala, Revised and Expanded (Series on Latin American Studies)

Author: by Stephen Schlesinger
Published at: David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies; 2nd edition (December 30, 2005)
ISBN: 978-0674019300

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Bitter Fruit is a comprehensive and insightful account of the CIA operation to overthrow the democratically elected government of Jacobo Arbenz of Guatemala in 1954. First published in 1982, this book has become a classic, a textbook case of the relationship between the United States and the Third World.

The authors make extensive use of U.S. Government documents and interviews with former CIA and other officials. It is a warning of what happens when the United States abuses its power.


4. A Forest of Kings: The Untold Story of the Ancient Maya

Author: by David Freidel
Published at: William Morrow Paperbacks; First Edition (January 24, 1992)
ISBN: 978-0688112042

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The recent interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs has given us the first written history of the New World as it existed before the European invasion. In this book, two of the first central figures in the massive effort to decode the glyphs, Linda Schele and David Freidel, make this history available in all its detail.

A Forest of Kings is the story of Maya kingship, from the beginning of its institution and the first great pyramid builders two thousand years ago to the decline of Maya civilization and its destruction by the Spanish. Here the great historic rulers of pre-Columbian civilization come to life again with the decipherment of their writing.

At its height, Maya civilization flourished under great kings like Shield-Jaguar, who ruled for more than sixty years, expanding his kingdom and building some of the most impressive works of architecture in the ancient world. Long placed on a mist-shrouded pedestal as austere, peaceful stargazers, the Maya elites are now known to have been the rulers of populous, aggressive city-states.


5. The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Essential Histories Series)

Author: by Marshall C. Eakin
Published at: St. Martin's Griffin; First edition (June 12, 2007)
ISBN: 978-1403980816

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This narrative history of Latin America surveys five centuries in less than five hundred pages. The first third of the book moves from the Americas before Columbus to the wars for independence in the early nineteenth century. The construction of new nations and peoples in the nineteenth century forms the middle third, and the final section analyzes economic development, rising political participation, and the search of identity over the last century.

The collision of peoples and cultures-Native Americans, Europeans, Africans-that defines Latin America, and gives it both its unity and diversity, provides the central theme of this concise, synthetic history.


6. Conquistador Voices: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas as Recounted Largely by the Participants

Author: by Kevin H Siepel
Published at: Spruce Tree Press; 1st edition (October 12, 2015)
ISBN: 978-0978646639

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The Spanish Conquest: What Really Happened? If you’re a person who likes to learn the messy details of events likely sanitized in your schoolbooks, Conquistador Voices may be for you. You’re likely to find this book not only informative but easy to read, because Conquistador Voices is built around first-person narrativesthe kind of thing that usually holds our attention.

Think of it as a film documentary in written form, one that tells an important story in 500-year-old sound bites and narrative, and that does so in a way that informs without moralizing. In this two-volume set you’ll find neither a defense of the conquistadors nor a politically correct polemic against them.

What you will find is a one-stop, five-part layman’s summary of the Conquest, one that delves dispassionately into persons and events we still talk about today. To see who’s covered in each volume, click on the volume’s cover image and then Look Inside.

If you like what you see, order a copy for yourself or other history buff today.


7. Incarcerated Stories: Indigenous Women Migrants and Violence in the Settler-Capitalist State (Critical Indigeneities)

Author: by Shannon Speed
Published at: University of North Carolina Press; Illustrated edition (October 26, 2019)
ISBN: 978-1469653129

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Indigenous women migrants from Central America and Mexico face harrowing experiences of violence before, during, and after their migration to the United States, like all asylum seekers. But as Shannon Speed argues, the circumstances for Indigenous women are especially devastating, given their disproportionate vulnerability to neoliberal economic and political policies and practices in Latin America and the United States, including policing, detention, and human trafficking.

Speed dubs this vulnerability “neoliberal multicriminalism” and identifies its relation to settler structures of Indigenous dispossession and elimination. Using innovative ethnographic practices to record and recount stories from Indigenous women in U.S. Detention, Speed demonstrates that these women’s vulnerability to individual and state violence is not rooted in a failure to exercise agency.

Rather, it is a structural condition, created and reinforced by settler colonialism, which consistently deploys racial and gender ideologies to manage the ongoing business of occupation and capitalist exploitation. With sensitive narration and sophisticated analysis, this book reveals the human consequences of state policy and practices throughout the Americas and adds vital new context for understanding the circumstances of migrants seeking asylum in the United States.


8. Maya Ruins Revisited: In the Footsteps of Teobert Maler

Author: by William Frej
Published at: Peyton Wright Gallery (October 20, 2020)
ISBN: 978-0578639215

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This stunning, substantial volume documents William Frej’s forty-five year search for remote Maya sites primarily in Guatemala and Mexico, inspired in large part by his discovery of the work of German-Austrian explorer Teobert Maler, who photographed them in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Many of Frej’s magnificent photographs are juxtaposed here with historic photographs taken by Maler, and reveal the changes in the landscape that have occurred in the intervening century. This unique pairing of archival material with current imagery of the same locations will be a significant addition to the literature on this ancient civilization that continues to captivate scholars and general readers alike.

The book provides extended captions for all of the photographs, including their historical context in relation to Maler’s images, which are archived at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, the Ibero-American Institute in Berlin, Brigham Young University, the University of New Mexico, and the Getty Museum in Los Angeles.


9. The Longest Line on the Map: The United States, the Pan-American Highway, and the Quest to Link the Americas

Author: by Eric Rutkow
Published at: Scribner; Illustrated edition (January 8, 2019)
ISBN: 978-1501103902

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From the award-winning author of American Canopy, a dazzling account of the world’s longest road, the Pan-American Highway, and the epic quest to link North and South America, a dramatic story of commerce, technology, politics, and the divergent fates of the Americas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The Pan-American Highway, monument to a century’s worth of diplomacy and investment, education and engineering, scandal and sweat, is the longest road in the world, passable everywhere save the mythic Darien Gap that straddles Panama and Colombia. The highway’s history, however, has long remained a mystery, a story scattered among government archives, private papers, and fading memories.

In contrast to the Panama Canal and its vast literature, the Pan-American Highwaythe United States’ other great twentieth-century hemispheric infrastructure projecthas become an orphan of the past, effectively erased from the story of the American Century. The Longest Line on the Map uncovers this incredible tale for the first time and weaves it into a tapestry that fascinates, informs, and delights.

10. Silence on the Mountain: Stories of Terror, Betrayal, and Forgetting in Guatemala (American Encounters/Global Interactions)

Author: by Daniel Wilkinson
Published at: Duke University Press Books; Illustrated edition (August 20, 2004)
ISBN: 979-0822333684

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New in paperbackSilence on the Mountain is a virtuoso work of reporting and a masterfully plotted narrative tracing the history of Guatemala’s thirty-six-year internal war, a conflict that claimed the lives of some 200,000 people, the vast majority of whom died (or were disappeared) at the hands of the U.S.

Backed military government. Written by Daniel Wilkinson, a young human rights worker, the story begins in 1993, when the author decides to investigate the arson of a coffee plantation’s manor house by a band of guerrillas. The questions surrounding this incident soon broaden into a complex mystery whose solution requires Wilkinson to dig up the largely unwritten history of the country’s recent civil war, following its roots back to a land reform movement that was derailed by a U.S.

Sponsored military coup in 1954 and to the origins of a plantation system that put Guatemala’s Mayan Indians to work picking coffee beans for the American and European markets. Decades of terror-inspired fear have led the Guatemalans to adopt a survival strategy of silence so complete that it verges on collective amnesia.

11. The Guatemala Reader: History, Culture, Politics (The Latin America Readers)

Author: by Greg Grandin
Published at: Duke University Press Books; unknown edition (October 31, 2011)
ISBN: 978-0822351078

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This reader brings together more than 200 texts and images in a broad introduction to Guatemala’s history, culture, and politics. In choosing the selections, the editors sought to avoid representing the country only in terms of its long experience of conflict, racism, and violence.

And so, while offering many perspectives on that violence, this anthology portrays Guatemala as a real place where people experience joys and sorrows that cannot be reduced to the contretemps of resistance and repression. It includes not only the opinions of politicians, activists, and scholars, but also poems, songs, plays, jokes, novels, short stories, recipes, art, and photographs that capture the diversity of everyday life in Guatemala.

The editors introduce all of the selections, from the first piece, an excerpt from the Popol Vuh, a mid-sixteenth-century text believed to be the single most important source documenting pre-Hispanic Maya culture, through the final selections, which explore contemporary Guatemala in relation to neoliberalism, multiculturalism, and the dynamics of migration to the United States and of immigrant life.

12. The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere)

Author: by Mary Miller
Published at: University of Texas Press; Illustrated edition (July 1, 2013)
ISBN: 978-0292744363

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Located within the deep tropical rainforest of Chiapas, Mexico, the Maya site of Bonampak is home to the most complete and magnificent mural program of the ancient Americas. In three rooms, a pageant of rulership opens up, scene by scene, like pages of an ancient Maya book.Painted c.

AD 800, the murals of Bonampak reveal a complex and multifaceted view of the ancient Maya at the end of their splendor during the last days of the Classic era. Members of the royal court engage in rituals and perform human sacrifice, dance in extravagant costumes and strip the clothing from fallen captives, acknowledge foreign nobles, and receive abundant tribute.

The murals are a powerful and sophisticated reflection on the spectacle of courtly life and the nature of artistic practice, a window onto a world that could not know its doomed future. This major new study of the paintings of Bonampak incorporates insights from decades of art historical, epigraphic, and technical investigation of the murals, framing questions about artistic conception, facture, narrative, performance, and politics.

13. Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala (American Encounters/Global Interactions)

Author: by Kirsten Weld
Published at: Duke University Press Books (March 21, 2014)
ISBN: 978-0822356028


Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala (American Encounters/Global Interactions) Cover

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In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala’s secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production. After Guatemala’s bloody thirty-six years of civil war (19601996), silence and impunity reigned.

That is, until 2005, when human rights investigators stumbled on the archives of the country’s National Police, which, at 75 million pages, proved to be the largest trove of secret state records ever found in Latin America. The unearthing of the archives renewed fierce debates about history, memory, and justice.

In Paper Cadavers, Weld explores Guatemala’s struggles to manage this avalanche of evidence of past war crimes, providing a firsthand look at how postwar justice activists worked to reconfigure terror archives into implements of social change. Tracing the history of the police files as they were transformed from weapons of counterinsurgency into tools for post-conflict reckoning, Weld sheds light on the country’s fraught transition from war to an uneasy peace, reflecting on how societies forget and remember political violence.

14. Political Movements and Violence in Central America (Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics)

Author: by Charles D. Brockett
Published at: Cambridge University Press; Illustrated edition (February 21, 2005)
ISBN: 978-0521600552

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This analysis of the confrontation between popular movements and repressive regimes in Central America, particularly in El Salvador and Guatemala, examines urban and rural groups as well as nonviolent social movements and revolutionary movements over three decades from 1960 on. It studies the impact of state violence on contentious political movements and defends the political process model for studying such movements.