Best Special Needs Biographies Books

Here you will get Best Special Needs Biographies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books for you.

1. There's a Hole in my Bucket: A Journey of Two Brothers

Author: by Royd Tolkien B08MZRKQPP Little A (August 1, 2021) August 1, 2021

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An inspirational, life-affirming memoir from the great-grandson of J.R.R.Tolkien. Having grown up on their great-grandfather’s stories, Royd Tolkien and his brother, Mike, have always enjoyed adventures. So when Mike is diagnosed with motor neurone disease, also known as ALS, the brothers decide to use the time they have left to tick off as much as possible from Mike’s bucket list, from remote camping in Norway to travelling through Royd’s beloved New Zealand.

Yet, when Royd loses Mike, he discovers his brother had been writing another kind of bucket list: fifty things he wanted Royd to do after his death.His first task? Mike wants his mild-mannered brother to trip up on his way to the lectern to deliver his eulogy.

What follows is a set of emotionally charged tests that will push Royd firmly out of his comfort zone. This is the story of Royd’s journey to accomplish a challenging, humorous, and often heartbreaking list of unknown tasks that chart the brothers’ lives from childhood to adulthood.


2. Population One: Autism, Adversity, and the Will to Succeed

Author: by Tyler McNamer Avia English 205 pages

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Part memoir, part inspirational guide, Population One: Autism, Adversity, and the Will to Succeed is a groundbreaking book that offers readers the ability to see life through the eyes of a young man with autism. Written by Tyler McNamer at the age of 17, Tyler not only details his challenges, but he also offers hope and encouragement to others who face seemingly insurmountable obstacles.

Whether you re an educator, a family member of someone with autism, or simply looking for inspiration, you ll appreciate the opportunity to step inside this remarkable young man s mind. As Tyler explains, I ve been called a retard, dumb, and disabled.

I ve been bullied, picked on, and made fun of. They put me in special classes and told me that I should not expect to reach my goals. Yet rather than view his diagnosis negatively, Tyler considers his unique viewpoint a gift.

It is with this perspective that he wrote Population One: Autism, Adversity, and the Will to Succeed. In this memorable book, Tyler details his experiences with bullying, isolation, and others low expectations of him. But rather than allowing himself to be limited by his autism diagnosis, this courageous and insightful young man rose above his challenges to encourage others to follow their dreams and become leaders in their own lives.


3. The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism

Author: by Naoki Higashida English ‎ 208 pages 081298515X

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One of the most remarkable books I’ve ever read. It’s truly moving, eye-opening, incredibly vivid. Jon Stewart, The Daily ShowNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BYNPR The Wall Street Journal Bloomberg Business BookishFINALIST FOR THE BOOKS FOR A BETTER LIFE FIRST BOOK AWARD NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERYou’ve never read a book like The Reason I Jump.

Written by Naoki Higashida, a very smart, very self-aware, and very charming thirteen-year-old boy with autism, it is a one-of-a-kind memoir that demonstrates how an autistic mind thinks, feels, perceives, and responds in ways few of us can imagine. Parents and family members who never thought they could get inside the head of their autistic loved one at last have a way to break through to the curious, subtle, and complex life within.

Using an alphabet grid to painstakingly construct words, sentences, and thoughts that he is unable to speak out loud, Naoki answers even the most delicate questions that people want to know. Questions such as: Why do people with autism talk so loudly and weirdly?


4. Call the Nurse: True Stories of a Country Nurse on a Scottish Isle (The Country Nurse Series, Book One)

Author: by Mary J. MacLeod B00C7XDYHO Arcade April 4, 2013

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Tired of the pace and noise of life near London and longing for a better place to raise their young children, Mary J. MacLeod and her husband encountered their dream while vacationing on a remote island in the Scottish Hebrides.

Enthralled by its windswept beauty, they soon were the proud owners of a near-derelict croft housea farmer’s stone cottageon a small acre of land. Mary assumed duties as the island’s district nurse. Call the Nurse is her account of the enchanted years she and her family spent there, coming to know its folk as both patients and friends.

In anecdotes that are by turns funny, sad, moving, and tragic, she recalls them all, the crofters and their laird, the boatmen and tradesmen, young lovers and forbidding churchmen. Against the old-fashioned island culture and the grandeur of mountain and sea unfold indelible stories: a young woman carried through snow for airlift to the hospital; a rescue by boat; the marriage of a gentle giant and the island beauty; a ghostly encounter; the shocking discovery of a woman in chains; the flames of a heather fire at night; an unexploded bomb from World War II; and the joyful, tipsy celebration of a ceilidh.


5. Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century

Author: by Alice Wong Vintage (June 30, 2020) English 336 pages

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ONE OF THE PROGRESSIVE’S BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAROne in five people in the United States lives with a disability. Some disabilities are visible, others less apparentbut all are underrepresented in media and popular culture. Now, just in time for the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong brings together this urgent, galvanizing collection of contemporary essays by disabled people.

From Harriet McBryde Johnson’s account of her debate with Peter Singer over her own personhood to original pieces by authors like Keah Brown and Haben Girma; from blog posts, manifestos, and eulogies to Congressional testimonies, and beyond: this anthology gives a glimpse into the rich complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community.

It invites readers to question their own understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and the past with hope and love.

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No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality

Author: by Michael J. Fox English 256 pages 1250265614

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INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A moving account of resilience, hope, fear and mortality, and how these things resonate in our lives, by actor and advocate Michael J.Fox. The entire world knows Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly, the teenage sidekick of Doc Brown in Back to the Future; as Alex P.

Keaton in Family Ties; as Mike Flaherty in Spin City; and through numerous other movie roles and guest appearances on shows such as The Good Wife and Curb Your Enthusiasm. Diagnosed at age 29, Michael is equally engaged in Parkinson’s advocacy work, raising global awareness of the disease and helping find a cure through The Michael J.

Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, the world’s leading non-profit funder of PD science. His two previous bestselling memoirs, Lucky Man and Always Looking Up, dealt with how he came to terms with the illness, all the while exhibiting his iconic optimism.

His new memoir reassesses this outlook, as events in the past decade presented additional challenges. In No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality, Michael shares personal stories and observations about illness and health, aging, the strength of family and friends, and how our perceptions about time affect the way we approach mortality.


7. How to Be Human: An Autistic Man's Guide to Life

Author: by Jory Fleming English 192 pages 1501180509

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An unforgettable, unconventional narrative that examines the many ways to be fully human, told by the first young adult with autism to attend Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. As a child, Jory Fleming was wracked by uncontrollable tantrums, had no tolerance for people, and couldn’t manage the outside world.

Slightly more than a decade later, he was bound for England, selected to attend one of the world’s premier universities. How to Be Human explores life amid a world constructed for neurotypical brains when yours is not. But the miracle of this book is that instead of dwelling on Jory’s limitations, those who inhabit the neurotypical world will begin to better understand their own: they will contemplate what language cannot say, how linear thinking leads to dead ends, and how nefarious emotions can be, particularly when, in Jory’s words, they are weaponized.

Through a series of deep, personal conversations with writer Lyric Winik, Jory makes a compelling case for logical empathy based on rational thought, asks why we tolerate friends who see us as a means to an end, and explains why he believes personality is a choice.


8. Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's

Author: by John Elder Robison Three Rivers Press English 302 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER As sweet and funny and sad and true and heartfelt a memoir as one could find. From the foreword by Augusten Burroughs Ever since he was young, John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habitsan inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother, Augusten Burroughs, in them)had earned him the label social deviant.

It was not until he was forty that he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome. That understanding transformed the way he saw himselfand the world. A born storyteller, Robison has written a moving, darkly funny memoir about a life that has taken him from developing exploding guitars for KISS to building a family of his own.

It’s a strange, sly, indelible accountsometimes alien yet always deeply human.


9. The Miracle Worker: A Play

Author: by William Gibson Scribner English 128 pages

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Based on the remarkable true story of Helen Keller and her teacher Annie Sullivan, this inspiring and unforgettable play has moved countless readers and become an American classic. Young Helen Keller, blind, deaf, and mute since infancy, is in danger of being sent to an institution because her inability to communicate has left her frustrated and violent.

In desperation, her parents seek help from the Perkins Institute, which sends them a “half-blind Yankee schoolgirl” named Annie Sullivan to tutor their daughter. Despite the Kellers’ resistance and the belief that Helen “is like a little safe, locked, that no one can open,” Annie suspects that within Helen lies the potential for more, if only she can reach her.

Through persistence, love, and sheer stubbornness, Annie breaks through Helen’s walls of silence and darkness and teaches her to communicate, bringing her into the world at last.

10. Thinking in Pictures, Expanded Edition: My Life with Autism

Author: by Temple Grandin Vintage English 270 pages

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Updated for a new era, the 25th anniversary edition of this seminal work on autism and neurodiversity provides a uniquely fascinating view (Deborah Tannen, author of You Just Don’t Understand) of the differences in our brains. Originally published in 1995 as an unprecedented look at autism, Grandin writes from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person to give a report from the country of autism.

Introducing a groundbreaking model which analyzes people based on their patterns of thought, Grandin charts the differences between her life and the lives of those who think in words (The Philadelphia Inquirer). For the new edition, Grandin has written a new afterword addressing recent developments in the study of autism, including new diagnostic criteria, advancements in genetic research, updated tips, insights into working with children and young people with autism, and more.

11. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: A Memoir of Life in Death

Author: by Jean-Dominique Bauby Vintage (June 23, 1998) English 131 pages

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A celebration of the liberating power of consciousnessa triumphant book that lets us witness an indomitable spirit and share in the pure joy of its own survival. In 1995, Jean-Dominique Bauby was the editor-in-chief of French Elle, the father of two young childen, a 44-year-old man known and loved for his wit, his style, and his impassioned approach to life.

By the end of the year he was also the victim of a rare kind of stroke to the brainstem. After 20 days in a coma, Bauby awoke into a body which had all but stopped working: only his left eye functioned, allowing him to see and, by blinking it, to make clear that his mind was unimpaired.

Almost miraculously, he was soon able to express himself in the richest detail: dictating a word at a time, blinking to select each letter as the alphabet was recited to him slowly, over and over again. In the same way, he was able eventually to compose this extraordinary book.

By turns wistful, mischievous, angry, and witty, Bauby bears witness to his determination to live as fully in his mind as he had been able to do in his body. He explains the joy, and deep sadness, of seeing his children and of hearing his aged father’s voice on the phone.

12. Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist

Author: by Judith Heumann English 232 pages 0807002801

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A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year for Nonfiction”… An essential and engaging look at recent disability history.” BuzzfeedOne of the most influential disability rights activists in US history tells her personal story of fighting for the right to receive an education, have a job, and just be human.

A story of fighting to belong in a world that wasn’t built for all of us and of one woman’s activismfrom the streets of Brooklyn and San Francisco to inside the halls of WashingtonBeing Heumann recounts Judy Heumann’s lifelong battle to achieve respect, acceptance, and inclusion in society.

Paralyzed from polio at eighteen months, Judy’s struggle for equality began early in life. From fighting to attend grade school after being described as a fire hazard to later winning a lawsuit against the New York City school system for denying her a teacher’s license because of her paralysis, Judy’s actions set a precedent that fundamentally improved rights for disabled people.

13. Three Minutes for a Dog: My Life in an Iron Lung

Author: by Paul R. Alexander English 156 pages 1525525328

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For all women looking to find hope in a hopeless world and bravery in an age that seems to lack it, comes a searing memoir by Shannon Dingle, a writer and disability advocate who has navigated loss, trauma, abuse, spiritual reawakening, and deep painand come out the other side still hopeful.

Shannon Dingle has experienced more than her fair share of tragedy and trauma in her life, including surviving sexual abuse and trafficking as a child that left her with lasting disabilities and experiencing faith shifts that put her at odds with the evangelical church that had been her home.

Then, in July 2019, Shannon’s husband was tragically killed by a rogue wave while the family was on vacation. The grief of the aftermath of losing her love and life partner sits at the heart of Living Brave, where Shannon’s searing, raw prose, illustrates what it looks like to take brave steps on the other side of unimaginable loss.

Through each challenge, she reveals the ways she learned to walk through them to the other side, and find courage even through the darkest moments. Living Brave gives women permission to wrestle with difficult topics, to use their voice, to take a stand for justice, to honor the wisdom of their bodies, and to enact change from a place of strong faith.