Best Author Biographies Books

Here you will get Best Author Biographies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books for you.

1. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Author: by Maya Angelou Published at: Ballantine Books; Reissue edition (April 21, 2009) ISBN: 978-0345514400

View on Amazon

Here is a book as joyous and painful, as mysterious and memorable, as childhood itself. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right.

Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide. Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local powhitetrash.

At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her ageand has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.

Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings liberates the reader into life simply because Maya Angelou confronts her own life with such a moving wonder, such a luminous dignity.James Baldwin


2. Let Me Tell You What I Mean

Author: by Joan Didion Published at: Knopf; 1st Edition (January 26, 2021)

ISBN: 978-0593318485

View on Amazon

A New York Times Best Seller* From one of our most iconic and influential writers: a timeless collection of mostly early pieces that reveal what would become Joan Didion’s subjects, including the press, politics, California robber barons, women, and her own self-doubt.

A Most Anticipated Book of 2021 from Vogue, TIME, Bustle, The New York Times and many more. These twelve pieces from 1968 to 2000, never before gathered together, offer an illuminating glimpse into the mind and process of a legendary figure. They showcase Joan Didion’s incisive reporting, her empathetic gaze, and her role as “an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time” (The New York Times Book Review).

Here, Didion touches on topics ranging from newspapers (“the problem is not so much whether one trusts the news as to whether one finds it”), to the fantasy of San Simeon, to not getting into Stanford. In “Why I Write,” Didion ponders the act of writing: “I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means.” From her admiration for Hemingway’s sentences to her acknowledgment that Martha Stewart’s story is one “that has historically encouraged women in this country, even as it has threatened men,” these essays are acutely and brilliantly observed.


3. The Glass Castle: A Memoir

Author: by Jeannette Walls Published at: Scribner Book Company; 1st edition (January 1, 2006) ISBN: 978-0743247542

The Glass Castle: A Memoir Cover

View on Amazon

Now a major motion picture from Lionsgate starring Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson, and Naomi Watts. MORE THAN SEVEN YEARS ON THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER LIST The perennially bestselling, extraordinary, one-of-a-kind, nothing short of spectacular (Entertainment Weekly) memoir from one of the world’s most gifted storytellers.

The Glass Castle is a remarkable memoir of resilience and redemption, and a revelatory look into a family at once deeply dysfunctional and uniquely vibrant. When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly.

But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family. The Walls children learned to take care of themselves. They fed, clothed, and protected one another, and eventually found their way to New York.

Their parents followed them, choosing to be homeless even as their children prospered. The Glass Castle is truly astonishinga memoir permeated by the intense love of a peculiar but loyal family.


4. Into the Wild

Author: by Jon Krakauer Published at: Anchor Books; 1st edition (February 1, 1997) ISBN: 978-0385486804

View on Amazon

Krakauer’s page-turning bestseller explores a famed missing person mystery while unraveling the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons.”Terrifying…Eloquent…

A heart-rending drama of human yearning.” New York TimesIn April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt.McKinley. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself.

Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How Christopher Johnson McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild. Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir.


5. Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own

Author: by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. Published at: Crown; 1st edition (June 30, 2020) ISBN: 978-0525575320

View on Amazon

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A powerful study of how to bear witness in a moment when America is being called to do the same. Time James Baldwin grew disillusioned by the failure of the civil rights movement to force America to confront its lies about race.

What can we learn from his struggle in our own moment? Named one of the best books of the year by Time, The Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune Winner of the Stowe Prize Shortlisted for the Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice Not everything is lost.

Responsibility cannot be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again. James Baldwin Begin Again is one of the great books on James Baldwin and a powerful reckoning with America’s ongoing failure to confront the lies it tells itself about race.

Just as in Baldwin’s after times, argues Eddie S. Glaude Jr., when white Americans met the civil rights movement’s call for truth and justice with blind rage and the murders of movement leaders, so in our moment were the Obama presidency and the birth of Black Lives Matter answered with the ascendance of Trump and the violent resurgence of white nationalism.


6. The Year of Magical Thinking

Author: by Joan Didion Published at: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group; Reprint edition (February 13, 2007) ISBN: 978-1400078431

View on Amazon

National BestsellerFrom one of America’s iconic writers, a stunning book of electric honesty and passion that explores an intensely personal yet universal experience: a portrait of a marriageand a life, in good times and badthat will speak to anyone who has ever loved a husband or wife or child.

Several days before Christmas 2003, John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion saw their only daughter, Quintana, fall ill with what seemed at first flu, then pneumonia, then complete septic shock. She was put into an induced coma and placed on life support.

Days laterthe night before New Year’s Evethe Dunnes were just sitting down to dinner after visiting the hospital when John Gregory Dunne suffered a massive and fatal coronary. In a second, this close, symbiotic partnership of forty years was over.

Four weeks later, their daughter pulled through. Two months after that, arriving at LAX, she collapsed and underwent six hours of brain surgery at UCLA Medical Center to relieve a massive hematoma. This powerful book is Didion’ s attempt to make sense of the weeks and then months that cut loose any fixed idea I ever had about death, about illness …

7


Tom Stoppard: A Life

Author: by Hermione Lee Published at: Knopf (February 23, 2021) ISBN: 978-0451493224

View on Amazon

One of our most brilliant biographers takes on one of our greatest living playwrights, drawing on a wealth of new materials and on many conversations with himOne of our most brilliant biographers takes on one of our greatest living playwrights, drawing on a wealth of new materials and on many conversations with himTom Stoppard is a towering and beloved literary figure.

Known for his dizzying narrative inventiveness and intense attention to language, he deftly deploys art, science, history, politics, and philosophy in works that span a remarkable spectrum of literary genres: theater, radio, film, TV, journalism, and fiction. His most acclaimed creations-Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, The Real Thing, Arcadia, The Coast of Utopia, Shakespeare in Love-remain as fresh and moving as when they entranced their first audiences.

Born in Czechoslovakia, Stoppard escaped the Nazis with his mother and spent his early years in Singapore and India before arriving in England at age eight. Skipping university, he embarked on a brilliant career, becoming close friends over the years with an astonishing array of writers, actors, directors, musicians, and political figures, from Peter O’Toole, Harold Pinter, and Stephen Spielberg to Mick Jagger and Vclav Havel.


8. True Believer: The Rise and Fall of Stan Lee

Author: by Abraham Riesman Published at: Crown (February 16, 2021) ISBN: 978-0593135716

View on Amazon

The definitive, revelatory biography of Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee, a writer and entrepreneur who reshaped global pop cultureat a steep personal cost A biography that reads like a thriller or a whodunit … Scrupulously honest, deeply damning, and sometimes even heartbreaking.

Neil GaimanStan Leeborn Stanley Martin Lieber in 1922was one of the most beloved and influential entertainers to emerge from the twentieth century. He served as head editor of Marvel for three decades and, in that time, launched more pieces of internationally recognizable intellectual property than anyone other than Walt Disney: Spider-Man, the Avengers, the X-Men, Black Panther, the Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Thor …

The list seems to never end. On top of that, his carnival-barker marketing prowess more or less single-handedly saved the comic-book industry and superhero fiction. Without him, the global entertainment industry would be wildly differentand a great deal poorer. But Lee’s unprecedented career was also filled with spectacular failures, controversy, and bitter disputes.


9. The Copenhagen Trilogy: Childhood; Youth; Dependency

Author: by Tove Ditlevsen Published at: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 26, 2021) ISBN: 978-0374602390

View on Amazon

Called “a masterpiece” by The New York Times, the acclaimed trilogy from Tove Ditlevsen, a pioneer in the field of genre-bending confessional writingTove Ditlevsen is today celebrated as one of the most important and unique voices in twentieth-century Danish literature, and The Copenhagen Trilogy (196971) is her acknowledged masterpiece.

Childhood tells the story of a misfit child’s single-minded determination to become a poet; Youth describes her early experiences of sex, work, and independence. Dependency picks up the story as the narrator embarks on the first of her four marriages and goes on to describe her horrible descent into drug addiction, enabled by her sinister, gaslighting doctor-husband.

Throughout, the narrator grapples with the tension between her vocation as a writer and her competing roles as daughter, wife, mother, and drug addict, and she writes about female experience and identity in a way that feels very fresh and pertinent to today’s discussions around feminism.

10. Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History

Author: by Art Spiegelman Published at: Pantheon (August 12, 1986) ISBN: 978-0394747231

View on Amazon

The first installment of the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel acclaimed as the most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust (Wall Street Journal) and the first masterpiece in comic book history (The New Yorker). A brutally moving work of artwidely hailed as the greatest graphic novel ever writtenMaus recounts the chilling experiences of the author’s father during the Holocaust, with Jews drawn as wide-eyed mice and Nazis as menacing cats.

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale, weaving the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father into an astonishing retelling of one of history’s most unspeakable tragedies. It is an unforgettable story of survival and a disarming look at the legacy of trauma.

11. The Gulag Archipelago Volume 1: An Experiment in Literary Investigation

Author: by Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn 704 pages 9780061253713 1.2 pounds

View on Amazon

BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE 20TH CENTURY TimeVolume 1 of the gripping epic masterpiece, Solzhenitsyn’s chilling report of his arrest and interrogation, which exposed to the world the vast bureaucracy of secret police that haunted Soviet society. Features a new foreword by Anne Applebaum.

The greatest and most powerful single indictment of a political regime ever leveled in modern times.George F. KennanIt is impossible to name a book that had a greater effect on the political and moral consciousness of the late twentieth century.

David Remnick, The New YorkerSolzhenitsyn’s masterpiece…. The Gulag Archipelago helped create the world we live in today. Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Gulag: A History, from the foreword

12. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream

Author: by Hunter S. Thompson Published at: Vintage; 2nd edition (May 12, 1998) ISBN: 978-0679785897

View on Amazon

This cult classic of gonzo journalism is the best chronicle of drug-soaked, addle-brained, rollicking good times ever committed to the printed page. It is also the tale of a long weekend road trip that has gone down in the annals of American pop culture as one of the strangest journeys ever undertaken.

Now a major motion picture from Universal, directed by Terry Gilliam and starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.

13. The Tender Bar: A Memoir

Author: by J. R. Moehringer Published at: Hachette Books (August 1, 2006) ISBN: 978-0786888764

View on Amazon

The New York Times bestseller and one of the 100 Most Notable Books of 2005. In the tradition of This Boy’s Life and The Liar’s Club, a raucous, poignant, luminously written memoir about a boy striving to become a man, and his romance with a bar.J.R.

Moehringer grew up captivated by a voice. It was the voice of his father, a New York City disc jockey who vanished before J.R. Spoke his first word. Sitting on the stoop, pressing an ear to the radio, J.R.

Would strain to hear in that plummy baritone the secrets of masculinity and identity.Though J. R.’s mother was his world, his rock, he craved something more, something faintly and hauntingly audible only in The Voice. At eight years old, suddenly unable to find The Voice on the radio, J.R.

Turned in desperation to the bar on the corner, where he found a rousing chorus of new voices. The alphas along the bar-including J. R.’s Uncle Charlie, a Humphrey Bogart look-alike; Colt, a Yogi Bear sound-alike; and Joey D, a softhearted brawler-took J.R.

14. Travels with Charley in Search of America

Author: by John Steinbeck Published at: Penguin Books; F edition (January 31, 1980) ISBN: 978-0140053203

View on Amazon

An intimate journey across America, as told by one of its most beloved writers To hear the speech of the real America, to smell the grass and the trees, to see the colors and the lightthese were John Steinbeck’s goals as he set out, at the age of fifty-eight, to rediscover the country he had been writing about for so many years.

With Charley, his French poodle, Steinbeck drives the interstates and the country roads, dines with truckers, encounters bears at Yellowstone and old friends in San Francisco. Along the way he reflects on the American character, racial hostility, the particular form of American loneliness he finds almost everywhere, and the unexpected kindness of strangers.

15. Reasons to Stay Alive

Author: by Matt Haig Published at: Penguin Life (February 23, 2016) ISBN: 978-0143128724

View on Amazon

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Midnight Library. Matt Haig’s accessible and life-affirming memoir of his struggle with depression, and how his triumph over the illness taught him to live.”Destined to become a modern classic.” Entertainment Weekly Like nearly one in five people, Matt Haig suffers from depression.

Reasons to Stay Alive is Matt’s inspiring account of how, minute by minute and day by day, he overcame the disease with the help of reading, writing, and the love of his parents and his girlfriend (and now-wife), Andrea. And eventually, he learned to appreciate life all the more for it.

Everyone’s lives are touched by mental illness: if we do not suffer from it ourselves, then we have a friend or loved one who does. Matt’s frankness about his experiences is both inspiring to those who feel daunted by depression and illuminating to those who are mystified by it.

Above all, his humor and encouragement never let us lose sight of hope. Speaking as his present self to his former self in the depths of depression, He is adamant that the oldest clich is the truestthere is light at the end of the tunnel.