Best Dominican Republic History Books

Here you will get Best Dominican Republic History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution

Author: by C.L.R. James
Published at: Vintage; 2nd ed. edition (October 23, 1989)
ISBN: 978-0679724674

View on Amazon

This updated and expanded edition extends the narrative from 1990 to the first decade of the present century, beginning with the collapse of the Dominican economy. In addition to the electoral fraud and constitutional reforms of 1994 and the return administration of Leonel Fernandez, the updated chapters focus on financial crises, the economic reforms of the 1990s, the free trade agreement with the United States, and party politics.

They also take account of the recent Dominican electoral processes, the colossal and fraudulent banking crisis of 2002-2004, and the perpetuation of corruption as part of Dominican political culture.


3. Conquistador Voices: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas as Recounted Largely by the Participants

Author: by Kevin H Siepel
Published at: Spruce Tree Press; 1st edition (October 12, 2015)
ISBN: 978-0978646622

View on Amazon

The Spanish Conquest: What Really Happened? If you’re a person who likes to learn the messy details of events likely sanitized in your schoolbooks, Conquistador Voices may be for you. You’re likely to find this book not only informative but easy to read, because Conquistador Voices is built around first-person narrativesthe kind of thing that usually holds our attention.

Think of it as a film documentary in written form, one that tells an important story in 500-year-old sound bites and narrative, and that does so in a way that informs without moralizing. In this two-volume set you’ll find neither a defense of the conquistadors nor a politically correct polemic against them.

What you will find is a one-stop, five-part layman’s summary of the Conquest, one that delves dispassionately into persons and events we still talk about today. To see who’s covered in each volume, click on the volume’s cover image and then Look Inside.

If you like what you see, order a copy for yourself or other history buff today.


4. The Borders of Dominicanidad: Race, Nation, and Archives of Contradiction

Author: by Lorgia García-Peña
Published at: Duke University Press Books (November 8, 2016)
ISBN: 978-0822362623

View on Amazon

In The Borders of Dominicanidad Lorgia Garca-Pea explores the ways official narratives and histories have been projected onto racialized Dominican bodies as a means of sustaining the nation’s borders. Garca-Pea constructs a genealogy of dominicanidad that highlights how Afro-Dominicans, ethnic Haitians, and Dominicans living abroad have contested these dominant narratives and their violent, silencing, and exclusionary effects.

Centering the role of U.S. Imperialism in drawing racial borders between Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and the United States, she analyzes musical, visual, artistic, and literary representations of foundational moments in the history of the Dominican Republic: the murder of three girls and their father in 1822; the criminalization of Afro-religious practice during the U.S.

Occupation between 1916 and 1924; the massacre of more than 20,000 people on the Dominican-Haitian border in 1937; and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Garca-Pea also considers the contemporary emergence of a broader Dominican consciousness among artists and intellectuals that offers alternative perspectives to questions of identity as well as the means to make audible the voices of long-silenced Dominicans.


5. Pirate Hunters: Treasure, Obsession, and the Search for a Legendary Pirate Ship

Author: by Robert Kurson
Published at: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (March 1, 2016)
ISBN: 978-0812973693

View on Amazon

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE A thrilling adventure of danger and deep-sea diving, historic mystery and suspense, by the author of Shadow Divers Finding and identifying a pirate ship is the hardest thing to do under the sea.

But two menJohn Chatterton and John Matteraare willing to risk everything to find the Golden Fleece, the ship of the infamous pirate Joseph Bannister. At large during the Golden Age of Piracy in the seventeenth century, Bannister should have been immortalized in the lore of the seahis exploits more notorious than Blackbeard’s, more daring than Kidd’s.

But his story, and his ship, have been lost to time. If Chatterton and Mattera succeed, they will make historyit will be just the second time ever that a pirate ship has been discovered and positively identified. Soon, however, they realize that cutting-edge technology and a willingness to lose everything aren’t enough to track down Bannister’s ship.


6. DK Eyewitness Caribbean (Travel Guide)

Author: by DK Eyewitness
Published at: DK Eyewitness Travel; Illustrated edition (December 17, 2019)
ISBN: 978-0241368886

View on Amazon

Escape to islands infused with vivacious culture. Whether you want to join the world’s biggest street party in Trinidad, cruise around the Virgin Islands or admire Havana’s yesteryear architecture, your DK Eyewitness travel guide makes sure you experience all that the Caribbean has to offer.

The Caribbean conjures up images of white-sand beaches shaded by palms and lapped by crystal seas. But these immensely varied islands offer so much more – from rainforest hikes to colonial-era sights, creole flavours to reggae rhythms. Our regularly updated guide brings the Caribbean to life, transporting you there like no other travel guide does with expert-led insights and advice, detailed information on all the must-see sights, inspiring photography, and our trademark illustrations.

You’ll discover: – our pick of the Caribbean’s must-sees, top experiences, and hidden gems- the best spots to eat, drink, shop and stay – detailed maps and walks which make navigating the region easy- easy-to-follow itineraries- expert advice: get ready, get around, and stay safe- color-coded chapters to every part of the Caribbean, from Cuba to the Cayman Islands, Jamaica to Barbados- our new lightweight format, so you can take it with you wherever you goJust visiting Cuba?


7. The Dominican Racial Imaginary: Surveying the Landscape of Race and Nation in Hispaniola (Critical Caribbean Studies)

Author: by Milagros Ricourt
Published at: Rutgers University Press; Illustrated edition (November 18, 2016)
ISBN: 978-0813584478

View on Amazon

Honorable mention, 2017 Gordon K. And Sybil Lewis Award from the Caribbean Studies Association This book begins with a simple question: why do so many Dominicans deny the African components of their DNA, culture, and history? Seeking answers, Milagros Ricourt uncovers a complex and often contradictory Dominican racial imaginary.

Observing how Dominicans have traditionally identified in opposition to their neighbors on the island of HispaniolaHaitians of African descentshe finds that the Dominican Republic’s social elite has long propagated a national creation myth that conceives of the Dominican as a perfect hybrid of native islanders and Spanish settlers.

Yet as she pores through rare historical documents, interviews contemporary Dominicans, and recalls her own childhood memories of life on the island, Ricourt encounters persistent challenges to this myth. Through fieldwork at the Dominican-Haitian border, she gives a firsthand look at how Dominicans are resisting the official account of their national identity and instead embracing the African influence that has always been part of their cultural heritage.


8. The Last Playboy: The High Life of Porfirio Rubirosa

Author: by Shawn Levy
Published at: Harper Perennial (May 19, 2016)
ISBN: 978-0007171071

View on Amazon

A scandalous story of money, drugs, fast cars, high politics, lowly crime, hundreds of beautiful woman and one man, Porfirio Rubirosa from the celebrated author of RAT PACK CONFIDENTIAL. The Dominican playboy Porfirio Rubirosa died at 8:00 am on July 5, 1965, when he smashed his Ferrari into a tree in Paris.

He was 56 years old and on his way home to his 28-year-old fifth wife, Odile Rodin, after a night’s debauch in celebration of a victorious polo match. In the previous four decades, Rubirosa had on four separate occasions married one of the wealthiest women in the world, and had slept with hundreds of other women including Marilyn Monroe, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Ava Gardner, and Eva Peron.

He had worked as aide-de-camp to one of the most vicious fascists the century ever knew. He had served as an ambassador to France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Argentina and Vichy. He had been a jewel thief, a forger, a shipping magnate, a treasure hunter.

He had held his own with the world’s most powerful and notorious men including John F. Kennedy, Josef Goebbels and Juan Peron. He ran comfortably celebrity circles, counting among his friends Frank Sinatra, Ted Kennedy, David Niven, Sammy Davis Jr., and fellow playboy Aly Khan.


9. The Dominican People

Author: by Ernesto Sagás
Published at: Markus Wiener Publishers; Annotated edition (December 29, 2015)
ISBN: 978-1558762978

View on Amazon

The vanquished Tano Indians, the Spanish conquistadors, rebellious slaves, common folk, foreign invaders, bloody dictators, gallant heroes, charismatic politicians, and committed rebels all have left their distinct imprint on Dominican society and left behind printed records. Nevertheless, the five-hundred-year history of the people of the Dominican Republic has yet to be told through its documents.

Although there has been a considerable production of documentary compilations in the Dominican Republic particularly during the Trujillo era few of these are known outside the country, and none have ever been translated into English. The Dominican People: A Documentary History bridges this gap by providing an annotated collection of documents related to the history of the Dominican Republic and its people.

The compilation features annotated documents on some of the transcendental events that have taken place on the island since pre-Columbian times: the extermination of the Tano Indians, sugar and African slavery, the establishment of French Saint Dominique, independence from Haiti and from Spain, caudillo politics, U.S.

11. Trujillo: The Death of a Dictator

Author: by Bernard Deiderich
Published at: Markus Wiener Publishers (September 19, 2017)
ISBN: 978-1558762060

View on Amazon

On May 30, 1961, a hail of bullets ended the life of Generalissimo Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, known to his countrymen as The Goat for his many revolting excesses, after thirty-one years of brutal rule over the Dominican Republic. This book is a riveting, minute-by-minute account of the plot to kill Trujillo, who was then the Western Hemisphere’s most ruthless dictator, and the ferocious wave of revenge that ensued before his regime collapsed.

The book also reveals the vacillating role of the United States and the CIA in first propping up the dictator, and then supplying weapons to slay him. Bernard Diederich knew most of those involved in the plot, and painstakingly recreates the events in a gripping book that reads like a novel, which also offers essential insights into the history of a troubled Caribbean nation.

12. The Eastern Stars: How Baseball Changed the Dominican Town of San Pedro de Macoris

Author: by Mark Kurlansky
Published at: Riverhead Books (April 15, 2010)
ISBN: 978-1594487507

View on Amazon

The intriguing, inspiring history of one small, impoverished area in the Dominican Republic that has produced a staggering number of Major League Baseball talent, from an award-winning, bestselling author. In the town of San Pedro in the Dominican Republic, baseball is not just a way of life.

It’s the way of life. By the year 2008, seventy-nine boys and men from San Pedro have gone on to play in the Major Leagues-that means one in six Dominican Republicans who have played in the Majors have come from one tiny, impoverished region.

Manny Alexander, Sammy Sosa, Tony Fernandez, and legions of other San Pedro players who came up in the sugar mill teams flocked to the United States, looking for opportunity, wealth, and a better life. Because of the sugar industry, and the influxes of migrant workers from across the Caribbean to work in the cane fields and factories, San Pedro is one of the most ethnically diverse areas of the Dominican Republic.

A multitude of languages are spoken there, and a variety of skin colors populate the community; but the one constant is sugar and baseball. The history of players from San Pedro is also a chronicle of racism in baseball, changing social mores in sports and in the Dominican Republic, and the personal stories of the many men who sought freedom from poverty through playing ball.

13. Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1959-1976

Author: by Piero Gleijeses
Published at: University of North Carolina Press; New edition (February 24, 2003)
ISBN: 978-0807854648

View on Amazon

This is a compelling and dramatic account of Cuban policy in Africa from 1959 to 1976 and of its escalating clash with U.S. Policy toward the continent. Piero Gleijeses’s fast-paced narrative takes the reader from Cuba’s first steps to assist Algerian rebels fighting France in 1961, to the secret war between Havana and Washington in Zaire in 1964-65-where 100 Cubans led by Che Guevara clashed with 1,000 mercenaries controlled by the CIA-and, finally, to the dramatic dispatch of 30,000 Cubans to Angola in 1975-76, which stopped the South African advance on Luanda and doomed Henry Kissinger’s major covert operation there.

Based on unprecedented archival research and firsthand interviews in virtually all of the countries involved-Gleijeses was even able to gain extensive access to closed Cuban archives-this comprehensive and balanced work sheds new light on U.S. Foreign policy and CIA covert operations.

It revolutionizes our view of Cuba’s international role, challenges conventional U.S. Beliefs about the influence of the Soviet Union in directing Cuba’s actions in Africa, and provides, for the first time ever, a look from the inside at Cuba’s foreign policy during the Cold War.”Fascinating …

14. Freedom Roots: Histories from the Caribbean

Author: by Laurent Dubois
Published at: University of North Carolina Press (December 16, 2019)
ISBN: 978-1469653600

View on Amazon

To tell the history of the Caribbean is to tell the history of the world,” write Laurent Dubois and Richard Lee Turits. In this powerful and expansive story of the vast archipelago, Dubois and Turits chronicle how the Caribbean has been at the heart of modern contests between slavery and freedom, racism and equality, and empire and independence.

From the emergence of racial slavery and European colonialism in the early sixteenth century to U.S. Annexations and military occupations in the twentieth, systems of exploitation and imperial control have haunted the region. Yet the Caribbean is also where empires have been overthrown, slavery was first defeated, and the most dramatic revolutions triumphed.

Caribbean peoples have never stopped imagining and pursuing new forms of liberty. Dubois and Turits reveal how the region’s most vital transformations have been ignited in the conflicts over competing visions of land. While the powerful sought a Caribbean awash in plantations for the benefit of the few, countless others anchored their quest for freedom in small-farming and counter-plantation economies, at times succeeding against all odds.

15. Black behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops

Author: by Ginetta E. B. Candelario
Published at: Duke University Press Books; Illustrated edition (December 12, 2007)
ISBN: 978-0822340379

View on Amazon

Black behind the Ears is an innovative historical and ethnographic examination of Dominican identity formation in the Dominican Republic and the United States. For much of the Dominican Republic’s history, the national body has been defined as not black, even as black ancestry has been grudgingly acknowledged.

Rejecting simplistic explanations, Ginetta E.B. Candelario suggests that it is not a desire for whiteness that guides Dominican identity discourses and displays. Instead, it is an ideal norm of what it means to be both indigenous to the Republic (indios) and Hispanic.

Both indigeneity and Hispanicity have operated as vehicles for asserting Dominican sovereignty in the context of the historically triangulated dynamics of Spanish colonialism, Haitian unification efforts, and U.S.Imperialism. Candelario shows how the legacy of that history is manifest in contemporary Dominican identity discourses and displays, whether in the national historiography, the national museum’s exhibits, or ideas about women’s beauty.