Best Economic History Books

Here you will get Best Economic History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Lights Out: Pride, Delusion, and the Fall of General Electric

Author: by Thomas Gryta
Mariner (May 4, 2021)
English
384 pages

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A WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER “If you’re in any kind of leadership rolewhether at a company, a non-profit, or somewhere elsethere’s a lot you can learn here.”Bill Gates, Gates NotesHow could General Electricperhaps America’s most iconic corporationsuffer such a swift and sudden fall from grace?

This is the definitive history of General Electric’s epic decline, as told by the two Wall Street Journal reporters who covered its fall. Since its founding in 1892, GE has been more than just a corporation. For generations, it was job security, a solidly safe investment, and an elite business education for top managers.

GE electrified America, powering everything from lightbulbs to turbines, and became fully integrated into the American societal mindset as few companies ever had. And after two decades of leadership under legendary CEO Jack Welch, GE entered the twenty-first century as America’s most valuable corporation.

Yet, fewer than two decades later, the GE of old was gone. Lights Out examines how Welch’s handpicked successor, Jeff Immelt, tried to fix flaws in Welch’s profit machine, while stumbling headlong into mistakes of his own. In the end, GE’s traditional win-at-all-costs driven culture seemed to lose its direction, which ultimately caused the company’s decline on both a personal and organizational scale.


2. Discrimination and Disparities

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Basic Books
English
320 pages

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An enlarged edition of Thomas Sowell’s brilliant examination of the origins of economic disparitiesEconomic and other outcomes differ vastly among individuals, groups, and nations. Many explanations have been offered for the differences. Some believe that those with less fortunate outcomes are victims of genetics.

Others believe that those who are less fortunate are victims of the more fortunate. Discrimination and Disparities gathers a wide array of empirical evidence to challenge the idea that different economic outcomes can be explained by any one factor, be it discrimination, exploitation, or genetics.

This revised and enlarged edition also analyzes the human consequences of the prevailing social vision of these disparities and the policies based on that vision-from educational disasters to widespread crime and violence.


3. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

Author: by Sheryl Sandberg
Knopf
English
240 pages

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The #1 international best seller In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg reignited the conversation around women in the workplace. Sandberg is chief operating officer of Facebook and coauthor of Option B with Adam Grant. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TED talk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers.

Her talk, which has been viewed more than six million times, encouraged women to sit at the table, seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals with gusto. Lean In continues that conversation, combining personal anecdotes, hard data, and compelling research to change the conversation from what women can’t do to what they can.

Sandberg provides practical advice on negotiation techniques, mentorship, and building a satisfying career. She describes specific steps women can take to combine professional achievement with personal fulfillment, and demonstrates how men can benefit by supporting women both in the workplace and at home.

Written with humor and wisdom, Lean In is a revelatory, inspiring call to action and a blueprint for individual growth that will empower women around the world to achieve their full potential.


4. Capitalism and Freedom

Author: by Milton Friedman
English
287 pages
022673479X

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One of TIME magazine’s All-TIME 100 Best Nonfiction Books One of Times Literary Supplement’s 100 Most Influential Books Since the War One of National Review’s 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the Century One of Intercollegiate Studies Institute’s 50 Best Books of the 20th Century How can we benefit from the promise of government while avoiding the threat it poses to individual freedom?

In this classic book, Milton Friedman provides the definitive statement of an immensely influential economic philosophyone in which competitive capitalism serves as both a device for achieving economic freedom and a necessary condition for political freedom. First published in 1962, Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom is one of the most significant works of economic theory ever written.

Enduring in its eminence and esteem, it has sold nearly a million copies in English, has been translated into eighteen languages, and continues to inform economic thinking and policymaking around the world. This new edition includes prefaces written by Friedman for both the 1982 and 2002 reissues of the book, as well as a new foreword by Binyamin Appelbaum, lead economics writer for the New York Times editorial board.


5. Economics in One Lesson: The Shortest and Surest Way to Understand Basic Economics

Author: by Henry Hazlitt
Currency
English
218 pages

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With over a million copies sold, Economics in One Lesson is an essential guide to the basics of economic theory. A fundamental influence on modern libertarianism, Hazlitt defends capitalism and the free market from economic myths that persist to this day.

Considered among the leading economic thinkers of the Austrian School, which includes Carl Menger, Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich (F.A. Hayek, and others, Henry Hazlitt (1894-1993), was a libertarian philosopher, an economist, and a journalist. He was the founding vice-president of the Foundation for Economic Education and an early editor of The Freeman magazine, an influential libertarian publication.

Hazlitt wrote Economics in One Lesson, his seminal work, in 1946. Concise and instructive, it is also deceptively prescient and far-reaching in its efforts to dissemble economic fallacies that are so prevalent they have almost become a new orthodoxy. Economic commentators across the political spectrum have credited Hazlitt with foreseeing the collapse of the global economy which occurred more than 50 years after the initial publication of Economics in One Lesson.


6. Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Author: by Daron Acemoglu
Currency
English
544 pages

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Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine? Is it culture, the weather, geography?

Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are?Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how to explain why Botswana has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world, while other African nations, such as Zimbabwe, the Congo, and Sierra Leone, are mired in poverty and violence?

Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson conclusively show that it is man-made political and economic institutions that underlie economic success (or lack of it). Korea, to take just one of their fascinating examples, is a remarkably homogeneous nation, yet the people of North Korea are among the poorest on earth while their brothers and sisters in South Korea are among the richest.

The south forged a society that created incentives, rewarded innovation, and allowed everyone to participate in economic opportunities. The economic success thus spurred was sustained because the government became accountable and responsive to citizens and the great mass of people.


7. The Road to Serfdom: Text and Documents–The Definitive Edition (The Collected Works of F. A. Hayek, Volume 2)

Author: by Hayek
English
283 pages
0226320553

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An unimpeachable classic work in political philosophy, intellectual and cultural history, and economics, The Road to Serfdom has inspired and infuriated politicians, scholars, and general readers for half a century. Originally published in 1944when Eleanor Roosevelt supported the efforts of Stalin, and Albert Einstein subscribed lock, stock, and barrel to the socialist programThe Road to Serfdom was seen as heretical for its passionate warning against the dangers of state control over the means of production.For F.A.

Hayek, the collectivist idea of empowering government with increasing economic control would lead not to a utopia but to the horrors of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. First published by the University of Chicago Press on September 18, 1944, The Road to Serfdom garnered immediate, widespread attention.

The first printing of 2,000 copies was exhausted instantly, and within six months more than 30,000 books were sold. In April 1945, Reader’s Digest published a condensed version of the book, and soon thereafter the Book-of-the-Month Club distributed this edition to more than 600,000 readers.


8. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You

Author: by John C. Maxwell
Thomas Nelson
English
336 pages

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9. Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States

Author: by Jonathan Levy
English
944 pages
0812995015

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A leading economic historian traces the evolution of American capitalism from the colonial era to the presentand argues that we’ve reached a turning point that will define the era ahead. The best one-volume history of American capitalism … It is impossible to understand the United States without understanding its economic history.

This book, from one of the nation’s foremost historians of capitalism, brings that important and endlessly fascinating story to life. Sven Beckert, author of Empire of CottonToday, in the midst of a new economic crisis and severe political discord, the nature of capitalism in United States is at a crossroads.

Since the market crash and Great Recession of 2008, historian Jonathan Levy has been teaching a course to help his students understand everything that had happened to reach that disaster and the current state of the economy, but in doing so he discovered something more fundamental about American history.

Now, in an ambitious single-volume history of the United States, he reveals how, from the beginning of U.S. History to the present, capitalism in America has evolved through four distinct ages and how the country’s economic evolution is inseparable from the nature of American life itself.

10. 1493: How Europe's Discovery of the Americas Revolutionized Trade, Ecology and Life on Earth

Author: by Charles C. Mann
B005WJ4LO0
September 15, 2011
English

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Two hundred million years ago the earth consisted of a single vast continent, Pangea, surrounded by a great planetary sea. Continental drift tore apart Pangaea, and for millennia the hemispheres were separate, evolving almost entirely different suites of plants and animals.

Columbus’s arrival in the Americas brought together these long-separate worlds. Many historians believe that this collision of ecosystems and cultures – the Columbian Exchange – was the most consequential event in human history since the Neolithic Revolution. And it was the most consequential event in biological history since the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Beginning with the world of microbes and moving up the species ladder to mankind, Mann rivetingly describes the profound effect this exchanging of species had on the culture of both continents.

11. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine

Author: by Michael Lewis
English
291 pages
0393338827

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The #1 New York Times bestseller: “It is the work of our greatest financial journalist, at the top of his game. And it’s essential reading.”Graydon Carter, Vanity Fair The real story of the crash began in bizarre feeder markets where the sun doesn’t shine and the SEC doesn’t dare, or bother, to tread: the bond and real estate derivative markets where geeks invent impenetrable securities to profit from the misery of lower- and middle-class Americans who can’t pay their debts.

The smart people who understood what was or might be happening were paralyzed by hope and fear; in any case, they weren’t talking. Michael Lewis creates a fresh, character-driven narrative brimming with indignation and dark humor, a fitting sequel to his #1 bestseller Liar’s Poker.

Out of a handful of unlikely-really unlikely-heroes, Lewis fashions a story as compelling and unusual as any of his earlier bestsellers, proving yet again that he is the finest and funniest chronicler of our time.

12. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

Author: by Edwin Lefèvre
Wiley
English
288 pages

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“Although Reminiscences… Was first published some seventy years ago, its take on crowd psychology and market timing is a s timely as last summer’s frenzy on the foreign exchange markets.” Worth magazine “The most entertaining book written on investing is Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, by Edwin Lefvre, first published in 1923.” The Seattle Times “After twenty years and many re-reads, Reminiscences is still one of my all-time favorites.” Kenneth L.

Fisher, Forbes “A must-read classic for all investors, whether brand-new or experienced.” William O’Neil, founder and Chairman, Investor’s Business Daily “Whilst stock market tomes have come and gone, this remains popular and in print eighty years on.” GQ magazine First published in 1923, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is the most widely read, highly recommended investment book ever.

Generations of readers have found that it has more to teach them about markets and people than years of experience. This is a timeless tale that will enrich your lifeand your portfolio.

13. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

Author: by Ron Chernow
Vintage

English
832 pages

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National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist From the acclaimed, award-winning author of Alexander Hamilton: here is the essential, endlessly engrossing biography of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.the Jekyll-and-Hyde of American capitalism. In the course of his nearly 98 years, Rockefeller was known as both a rapacious robber baron, whose Standard Oil Company rode roughshod over an industry, and a philanthropist who donated money lavishly to universities and medical centers.

He was the terror of his competitors, the bogeyman of reformers, the delight of caricaturistsand an utter enigma. Drawing on unprecedented access to Rockefeller’s private papers, Chernow reconstructs his subjects’ troubled origins (his father was a swindler and a bigamist) and his single-minded pursuit of wealth.

But he also uncovers the profound religiosity that drove him to give all I could; his devotion to his father; and the wry sense of humor that made him the country’s most colorful codger. Titan is a magnificent biographybalanced, revelatory, elegantly written.

14. Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History

Author: by Kurt Andersen
English
464 pages
1984801341

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER When did America give up on fairness? The author of Fantasyland tells the epic history of how America decided that big business gets whatever it wants, only the rich get richer, and nothing should ever changeand charts a way back to the future.

The one book everyone must read as we figure out how to rebuild our country. Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs and Leonardo da VinciDuring the twentieth century, America managed to make its economic and social systems both more and more fair and more and more prosperous.

A huge, secure, and contented middle class emerged. All boats rose together. But then the New Deal gave way to the Raw Deal. Beginning in the early 1970s, by means of a long war conceived of and executed by a confederacy of big business CEOs, the superrich, and right-wing zealots, the rules and norms that made the American middle class possible were undermined and dismantled.

The clock was turned back on a century of economic progress, making greed good, workers powerless, and the market all-powerful while weaponizing nostalgia, lifting up an oligarchy that served only its own interests, and leaving the huge majority of Americans with dwindling economic prospects and hope.

15. The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap

Author: by Mehrsa Baradaran
English
384 pages
0674237471

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Read this book.It explains so much about the momentBeautiful, heartbreaking work. Ta-Nehisi CoatesA deep accounting of how America got to a point where a median white family has 13 times more wealth than the median black family. The AtlanticExtraordinaryBaradaran focuses on a part of the American story that’s often ignored: the way African Americans were locked out of the financial engines that create wealth in America.

Ezra KleinWhen the Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1863, the black community owned less than 1 percent of the total wealth in America. More than 150 years later, that number has barely budged. The Color of Money seeks to explain the stubborn persistence of this racial wealth gap by focusing on the generators of wealth in the black community: black banks.

With the civil rights movement in full swing, President Nixon promoted black capitalism, a plan to support black banks and minority-owned businesses. But the catch-22 of black banking is that the very institutions needed to help communities escape the deep poverty caused by discrimination and segregation inevitably became victims of that same poverty.