Best Emigration & Immigration Studies Books

Here you will get Best Emigration & Immigration Studies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Author: by Isabel Wilkerson
Vintage
English
640 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In this beautifully written masterwork, the Pulitzer Prizewinning author chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.


2. Out of Many, One: Portraits of America's Immigrants

Author: by George W. Bush
Crown (April 20, 2021)
English
208 pages

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In this powerful new collection of oil paintings and stories, President George W. Bush spotlights the inspiring journeys of America’s immigrants and the contributions they make to the life and prosperity of our nation. The issue of immigration stirs intense emotions today, as it has throughout much of American history.

But what gets lost in the debates about policy are the stories of immigrants themselves, the people who are drawn to America by its promise of economic opportunity and political and religious freedomand who strengthen our nation in countless ways.

In the tradition of Portraits of Courage, President Bush’s #1 New York Times bestseller, Out of Many, One brings together forty-three full-color portraits of men and women who have immigrated to the United States, alongside stirring stories of the unique ways all of them are pursuing the American Dream.

Featuring men and women from thirty-five countries and nearly every region of the world, Out of Many, One shows how hard work, strong values, dreams, and determination know no borders or boundaries and how immigrants embody values that are often viewed as distinctly American: optimism and gratitude, a willingness to strive and to risk, a deep sense of patriotism, and a spirit of self-reliance that runs deep in our immigrant heritage.


3. Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother

Author: by Sonia Nazario
English
299 pages
0812971787

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An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and morethe definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.

Enrique’s Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops.

But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.


4. They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America (Journal of African Civilizations)

Author: by Ivan Van Sertima
English
336 pages
0812968174

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A landmark …Brilliantly [demonstrates] has that there is far more to black history than the slave trade.John A. Williams They Came Before Columbus reveals a compelling, dramatic, and superbly detailed documentation of the presence and legacy of Africans in ancient America.

Examining navigation and shipbuilding; cultural analogies between Native Americans and Africans; the transportation of plants, animals, and textiles between the continents; and the diaries, journals, and oral accounts of the explorers themselves, Ivan Van Sertima builds a pyramid of evidence to support his claim of an African presence in the New World centuries before Columbus.

Combining impressive scholarship with a novelist’s gift for storytelling, Van Sertima re-creates some of the most powerful scenes of human history: the launching of the great ships of Mali in 1310 (two hundred master boats and two hundred supply boats), the sea expedition of the Mandingo king in 1311, and many others.

In They Came Before Columbus, we see clearly the unmistakable face and handprint of black Africans in pre-Columbian America, and their overwhelming impact on the civilizations they encountered.


5. The Wretched of the Earth

Author: by Frantz Fanon
Grove Press
English
320 pages

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First published in 1961, Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth is a masterful and timeless interrogation of race, colonialism, psychological trauma, and revolutionary struggle. In 2020, it found a new readership in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests and the centering of narratives interrogating race by Black writers.

Bearing singular insight into the rage and frustration of colonized peoples, and the role of violence in spurring historical change, the book incisively attacks the twin perils of post-independence colonial politics: the disenfranchisement of the masses by the elites on the one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other.

A landmark text for revolutionaries and activists, The Wretched of the Earth is an eternal touchstone for civil rights, anti-colonialism, psychiatric studies, and Black consciousness movements around the world. Translated by Richard Philcox, and featuring now-classic critical essays by Jean-Paul Sartre and Homi K.


6. The Girl with Seven Names: Escape from North Korea

Author: by Hyeonseo Lee
William Collins
English
320 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERAn extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture/repatriation and guide her family to freedom. As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal communist regime.

Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit Kingdom and, as the famine of the 1990s struck, she began to wonder, question and to realise that she had been brainwashed her entire life.

Given the repression, poverty and starvation she witnessed surely her country could not be, as she had been told the best on the planet? Aged seventeen, she decided to escape North Korea. She could not have imagined that it would be twelve years before she was reunited with her family.


7. On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey

Author: by Paul Theroux
B07LC9F6ZY
Mariner Books
October 8, 2019

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The legendary travel writer drives the entire length of the USMexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland, on the back roads of Chiapas and Oaxaca, to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines. Paul Theroux has spent his life crisscrossing the globe in search of the histories and peoples that give life to the places they call home.

Now, as immigration debates boil around the world, Theroux has set out to explore a country key to understanding our current discourse: Mexico. Just south of the Arizona border, in the desert region of Sonora, he finds a place brimming with vitality, yet visibly marked by both the US Border Patrol to the north and mounting discord from within.

With the same humanizing sensibility he employed in Deep South, Theroux stops to talk with residents, visits Zapotec mill workers in the highlands, and attends a Zapatista party meeting, communing with people of all stripes who remain south of the border even as family members brave the journey north.


8. Scotland: A History from Earliest Times

Author: by Alistair Moffat

‎ B06Y1TPCKH
Birlinn
September 22, 2015

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Five hundred million years of Scottish history from the author of Arthur and the Lost Kingdoms: Deserves a prominent place in the history canon (Scots Magazine). Covering the Ice Age to the recent Scottish Referendum, the acclaimed historian and author explores the history of the Scottish nation.

Focusing on key moments such as the Battle of Bannockburn and the Jacobite risings, Moffat also features other episodes in history that are perhaps less well documented. From prehistoric timber halls to inventions and literature, Moffat’s epic explores the drama of battle, change, loss, and innovation interspersed with the lives of ordinary Scottish folk, the men and women who defined a nation.

Moffat plunders the facts and fables to create a richly-detailed and comprehensive analysis of a nation’s past and references a huge number of sources. Scotland Magazine The great thing about Moffat’s account is that, for all its emphasis on uncertainty, it rattles along with complete narrative certainty, to the extent that great events consistently take even a historically literate reader unawares.


9. Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

Author: by Firoozeh Dumas
0812968379
English
240 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Finalist for the PEN/USA Award in Creative Nonfiction, the Thurber Prize for American Humor, and the Audie Award in Biography/MemoirThis Random House Reader’s Circle edition includes a reading group guide and a conversation between Firoozeh Dumas and Khaled Hosseini, author of The Kite Runner!Remarkable …

Told with wry humor shorn of sentimentality … In the end, what sticks with the reader is an exuberant immigrant embrace of America. San Francisco ChronicleIn 1972, when she was seven, Firoozeh Dumas and her family moved from Iran to Southern California, arriving with no firsthand knowledge of this country beyond her father’s glowing memories of his graduate school years here.

More family soon followed, and the clan has been here ever since. Funny in Farsi chronicles the American journey of Dumas’s wonderfully engaging family: her engineer father, a sweetly quixotic dreamer who first sought riches on Bowling for Dollars and in Las Vegas, and later lost his job during the Iranian revolution; her elegant mother, who never fully mastered English (nor cared to); her uncle, who combated the effects of American fast food with an army of miraculous American weight-loss gadgets; and Firoozeh herself, who as a girl changed her name to Julie, and who encountered a second wave of culture shock when she met and married a Frenchman, becoming part of a one-couple melting pot.

10. A Nation of Immigrants

Author: by John F. Kennedy
B07D6NQPG7
October 16, 2018
English

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This significant contribution to the debate on immigration reform was President John F. Kennedy’s final book and is as timely now as it was when it was first publishednow reissued for its 60th anniversary, with a new introduction and foreword.

In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history…. It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.Robert F.

KennedyThroughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland.

This 60th anniversary edition of his posthumously published, timeless workwith a new introduction, a new foreword by Jonathan Greenblatt, the national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, and updated information on immigration policy reformoffers the late president’s inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America.

11. The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir

Author: by Thi Bui
Harry N. Abrams
English
336 pages

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National bestseller2017 National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) Finalist ABA Indies Introduce Winter / Spring 2017 Selection Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Spring 2017 Selection ALA 2018 Notable Books Selection An intimate and poignant graphic novel portraying one family’s journey from war-torn Vietnam, from debut author Thi Bui.

This beautifully illustrated and emotional story is an evocative memoir about the search for a better future and a longing for the past. Exploring the anguish of immigration and the lasting effects that displacement has on a child and her family, Bui documents the story of her family’s daring escape after the fall of South Vietnam in the 1970s, and the difficulties they faced building new lives for themselves.

At the heart of Bui’s story is a universal struggle: While adjusting to life as a first-time mother, she ultimately discovers what it means to be a parentthe endless sacrifices, the unnoticed gestures, and the depths of unspoken love. Despite how impossible it seems to take on the simultaneous roles of both parent and child, Bui pushes through.

12. The Undocumented Americans

Author: by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio
One World
English
208 pages

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NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST One of the first undocumented immigrants to graduate from Harvard reveals the hidden lives of her fellow undocumented Americans in this deeply personal and groundbreaking portrait of a nation. Karla’s book sheds light on people’s personal experiences and allows their stories to be told and their voices to be heard.

Selena Gomez LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST LONGLISTED FOR THE PORCHLIGHT BUSINESS BOOK AWARD NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VULTURE AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Book Review Time NPR The New York Public Library Book Riot Library JournalWriter Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name.

It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she’d tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell. So she wrote her immigration lawyer’s phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrantsand to find the hidden key to her own.

13. The Devil's Highway: A True Story

Author: by Luis Alberto Urrea
English
272 pages
0316010804

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From a Pulitzer Prize finalist, “the single most compelling, lucid, and lyrical contemporary account of the absurdity of U.S. Border policy” (The Atlantic). In May 2001, a group of men attempted to cross the Mexican border into the desert of southern Arizona, through the deadliest region of the continent, the “Devil’s Highway.” Three years later, Luis Alberto Urrea wrote about what happened to them.

The result was a national bestseller, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, a “book of the year” in multiple newspapers, and a work proclaimed as a modern American classic.

14. Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen

Author: by Jose Antonio Vargas
Dey Street Books
English
256 pages

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THE NATIONAL BESTSELLERThis riveting, courageous memoir ought to be mandatory reading for every American. Michelle Alexander, New York Times bestselling author of The New Jim Crowl cried reading this book, realizing more fully what my parents endured. Amy Tan, New York Times bestselling author of The Joy Luck Club and Where the Past BeginsThis book couldn’t be more timely and more necessary.

Dave Eggers, New York Times bestselling author of What Is the What and The Monk of MokhaPulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called the most famous undocumented immigrant in America, tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms.

This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This bookat its coreis not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in.

This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves.

15. Different Mirror: A History Of Multicultural America

Author: by Ronald Takaki
0316022365
Back Bay Books
English

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Ronald Takaki’s beloved classic is a “brilliant revisionist history of America” (Publishers Weekly) that dramatically retells our nation’s story from the perspective of minorities. Upon its first publication, A Different Mirror was hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation’s past.

Beginning with the colonization of the New World, it recounted the history of America in the voice of the non-Anglo peoples of the United States-Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, Irish Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and others-groups who helped create this country’s rich mosaic culture.

Now, Ronald Takaki has revised his landmark work and made it even more relevant and important. Among the new additions to the book are: The role of black soldiers in preserving the UnionThe history of Chinese Americans from 1900-1941An investigation into the hot-button issue of “illegal” immigrants from MexicoA look at the sudden visibility of Muslim refugees from Afghanistan.