Best Ethics Books

Here you will get Best Ethics Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Meditations: A New Translation

Author: by Marcus Aurelius
Published at: Modern Library; First American PB Edition (May 6, 2003)
ISBN: 978-0812968255

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Nearly two thousand years after it was written, Meditations remains profoundly relevant for anyone seeking to lead a meaningful life. Few ancient works have been as influential as the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, philosopher and emperor of Rome (A.D.161180).

A series of spiritual exercises filled with wisdom, practical guidance, and profound understanding of human behavior, it remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. Marcus’s insights and adviceon everything from living in the world to coping with adversity and interacting with othershave made the Meditations required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of ordinary readers have responded to the straightforward intimacy of his style.

For anyone who struggles to reconcile the demands of leadership with a concern for personal integrity and spiritual well-being, the Meditations remains as relevant now as it was two thousand years ago. In Gregory Hays’s new translationthe first in thirty-five yearsMarcus’s thoughts speak with a new immediacy.

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Discourses and Selected Writings (Penguin Classics)

Author: by Epictetus
Published at: Penguin Classics; 1st edition (November 25, 2008)
ISBN: 978-0140449464

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A new translation of the influential teachings of the great Stoic philosopherDESPITE BEING BORN into slavery, Greco-Roman philosopher Epictetus became one of the most influential thinkers of his time. Discourses and Selected Writings is a transcribed collection of informal lectures given by the philosopher around AD 108.

A gateway into the life and mind of a great intellectual, it is also an important example of the usage of Koine or ?Common? Greek, an ancestor to Standard Modern Greek.


3. Meditations (Penguin Classics)

Author: by Marcus Aurelius
Published at: Penguin Classics (October 31, 2006)
ISBN: 978-0140449334

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A leading translation of Stoic philosophy in wise and practical aphorisms that have inspired Bill Clinton, Ryan Holiday, Anna Kendrick and many more. Written in Greek by an intellectual Roman emperor without any intention of publication, the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius offer a wide range of fascinating spiritual reflections and exercises developed as the leader struggled to understand himself and make sense of the universe.

Spanning from doubt and despair to conviction and exaltation, they cover such diverse topics as the question of virtue, human rationality, the nature of the gods and the values of leadership. But while the Meditations were composed to provide personal consolation, in developing his beliefs Marcus also created one of the greatest of all works of philosophy: a series of wise and practical aphorisms that have been consulted and admired by statesmen, thinkers and ordinary readers for almost two thousand years.

To provide a full understanding of Aurelius’s seminal work, this edition includes explanatory notes, a general index, an index of quotations, an index of names, and an introduction by Diskin Clay putting the work in its biographical, historical, and literary context, a chronology of Marcus Aurelius’s life and career.


4. Beyond Good & Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future

Author: by Friedrich Nietzsche
Published at: Vintage (December 17, 1989)
ISBN: 978-0679724650

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Represents Nietzsche’s attempt to sum up his philosophy. In nine parts the book is designed to give the reader a comprehensive idea of Nietzsche’s thought and style: they span “The Prejudices of Philsophers,” “The Free Spirit,” religion, morals, scholarship, “Our Virtues,” “Peoples and Fatherlands,” and “What Is Noble,” as well as epigrams and a concluding poem.

Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most remarkable and influential books of the nineteenth century. This translation by Walter Kaufmann has become the standard one, for accuracy and fidelity to the eccentricities and grace of the style of the original.

The translation is based on the only edition Nietzsche himself published, and all variant reading in later editions. This volume offers an inclusive index of subjects and persons, as well as a running footnote commentary on the text.


5. What We Owe to Each Other

Author: by T. M. Scanlon
Published at: Belknap Press: An Imprint of Harvard University Press; Revised edition (November 15, 2000)
ISBN: 978-0674004238

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How do we judge whether an action is morally right or wrong? If an action is wrong, what reason does that give us not to do it? Why should we give such reasons priority over our other concerns and values?In this book, T.M.

Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other. According to his contractualist view, thinking about right and wrong is thinking about what we do in terms that could be justified to others and that they could not reasonably reject.

He shows how the special authority of conclusions about right and wrong arises from the value of being related to others in this way, and he shows how familiar moral ideas such as fairness and responsibility can be understood through their role in this process of mutual justification and criticism.

Scanlon bases his contractualism on a broader account of reasons, value, and individual well-being that challenges standard views about these crucial notions. He argues that desires do not provide us with reasons, that states of affairs are not the primary bearers of value, and that well-being is not as important for rational decision-making as it is commonly held to be.


6. The Fundamentals of Ethics

Author: by Russ Shafer-Landau
Published at: Oxford University Press; 5th edition (July 24, 2020)
ISBN: 978-0190058319

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In The Fundamentals of Ethics, Fifth Edition, author Russ Shafer-Landau employs a uniquely engaging writing style to introduce students to the essential ideas of moral philosophy. Offering more comprehensive coverage of the good life, normative ethics, and metaethics than any other text of its kind, this book also addresses issues that are often omitted from other texts, such as the doctrine of doing and allowing, the doctrine of double effect, ethical particularism, the desire-satisfaction theory of well-being, moral error theory, and Ross’s theory of prima facie duties.

Shafer-Landau carefully reconstructs and analyzes dozens of arguments in depth, at a level that is understandable to students with no prior philosophical background.


7. Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases

Author: by Lewis Vaughn
Published at: Oxford University Press; 4th edition (June 28, 2019)
ISBN: 978-0190903268

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Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases, Fourth Edition, explores the philosophical, medical, social, and legal aspects of key bioethical issues. Opening with a thorough introduction to ethics, bioethics, and moral reasoning, it then covers influential moral theories and the criteria for evaluating them.

Integrating eighty-seven readings-ten of them new to this edition-substantive introductions to each issue, numerous classic bioethical cases, and abundant pedagogical tools, this text addresses the most provocative and controversial topics in bioethics.


8. On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo

Author: by Friedrich Nietzsche
Published at: Vintage; Reissue edition (December 17, 1989)
ISBN: 978-0679724629

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The great philosopher’s major work on ethics, along with Ecce Homo, Nietzche’s remarkable review of his life and works. On the Genealogy of Morals (1887) shows him using philsophy, psychology, and classical philology in an effort to give new direction to an ancient discipline.

The work consists of three essays. The first contrasts master morality and slave morality and indicates how the term “good” has widely different meanings in each. The second inquiry deals with guilt and the bad conscience; the third with ascetic idealsnot only in religion but also in the academy.

Ecce Homo, written in 1898 and first published posthumously in 1908, is Nietzsche’s review of his life and works. It contains chapters on all the books he himself published. His interpretations are as fascinating as they are invaluable. Nothing Nietzsche wrote is more stunning stylistically or as a human document.

Walter Kaufmann’s masterful translations are faithful of the word and spirit of Nietzsche, and his running footnote commentaries on both books are more comprehensive than those in his other Nietzsche translations because these tow works have been so widely misunderstood.


9. After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory, Third Edition

Author: by Alasdair MacIntyre
Published at: University of Notre Dame Press; 3rd edition (March 6, 2007)
ISBN: 978-0268035044

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When After Virtue first appeared in 1981, it was recognized as a significant and potentially controversial critique of contemporary moral philosophy. Newsweek called it a stunning new study of ethics by one of the foremost moral philosophers in the English-speaking world.

Since that time, the book has been translated into more than fifteen foreign languages and has sold over one hundred thousand copies. Now, twenty-five years later, the University of Notre Dame Press is pleased to release the third edition of After Virtue, which includes a new prologue After Virtue after a Quarter of a Century.

In this classic work, Alasdair MacIntyre examines the historical and conceptual roots of the idea of virtue, diagnoses the reasons for its absence in personal and public life, and offers a tentative proposal for its recovery. While the individual chapters are wide-ranging, once pieced together they comprise a penetrating and focused argument about the price of modernity.

In the Third Edition prologue, MacIntyre revisits the central theses of the book and concludes that although he has learned a great deal and has supplemented and refined his theses and arguments in other works, he has as yet found no reason for abandoning the major contentions of this book.

10. Leviathan: With selected variants from the Latin edition of 1668 (Hackett Classics)

Author: by Thomas Hobbes
Published at: Hackett Publishing Company; Underlined, Notations edition (March 1, 1994)
ISBN: 978-0872201774

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Designed to meet the needs of both student and scholar, this edition of Leviathan offers a brilliant introduction by Edwin Curley, modernized spelling and punctuation of the text, and the inclusion, along with historical and interpretive notes, of the most significant variants between the English version of 1651 and the Latin version of 1668.

A glossary of seventeenth-century English terms, and indexes of persons, subjects, and scriptural passages help make this the most thoughtfully conceived edition of Leviathan available.

11. The Nicomachean Ethics (Oxford World's Classics)

Author: by Aristotle
Published at: Oxford University Press; New edition (July 15, 2009)
ISBN: 978-0199213610

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A student of Plato and a teacher of Alexander the Great, Aristotle is one of the towering figures in Western thought. A brilliant thinker with wide-ranging interests, he wrote important works in physics, biology, poetry, politics, morality, metaphysics, and ethics.

In the Nicomachean Ethics, which he is said to have dedicated to his son Nicomachus, Aristotle’s guiding question is what is the best thing for a human being? His answer is happiness. “Happiness,” he wrote, “is the best, noblest, and most pleasant thing in the world.” But he means not something we feel, not an emotion, but rather an especially good kind of life.

Happiness is made up of activities in which we use the best human capacities, both ones that contribute to our flourishing as members of a community, and ones that allow us to engage in god-like contemplation. Contemporary ethical writings on the role and importance of the moral virtues such as courage and justice have drawn inspiration from this work, which also contains important discussions on responsibility, practical reasoning, and on the role of friendship in creating the best life.

12. Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals: with On a Supposed Right to Lie because of Philanthropic Concerns (Hackett Classics)

Author: by Immanuel Kant
Published at: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.; Third Edition,3 (June 15, 1993)
ISBN: 978-0872201668


Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals: with On a Supposed Right to Lie because of Philanthropic Concerns (Hackett Classics) Cover

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This expanded edition of James Ellington’s preeminent translation includes Ellington’s new translation of Kant’s essay Of a Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns in which Kant replies to one of the standard objections to his moral theory as presented in the main text: that it requires us to tell the truth even in the face of disastrous consequences.

13. The Racial Contract

Author: by Charles W. Mills
Published at: Cornell University Press; 1st edition (June 21, 1999)
ISBN: 978-0801484636

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The Racial Contract puts classic Western social contract theory, deadpan, to extraordinary radical use. With a sweeping look at the European expansionism and racism of the last five hundred years, Charles W. Mills demonstrates how this peculiar and unacknowledged “contract” has shaped a system of global European domination: how it brings into existence “whites” and “non-whites,” full persons and sub-persons, how it influences white moral theory and moral psychology; and how this system is imposed on non-whites through ideological conditioning and violence.

The Racial Contract argues that the society we live in is a continuing white supremacist state. Holding up a mirror to mainstream philosophy, this provocative book explains the evolving outline of the racial contract from the time of the New World conquest and subsequent colonialism to the written slavery contract, to the “separate but equal” system of segregation in the twentieth-century United States.

According to Mills, the contract has provided the theoretical architecture justifying an entire history of European atrocity against non-whites, from David Hume’s and Immanuel Kant’s claims that blacks had inferior cognitive power, to the Holocaust, to the kind of imperialism in Asia that was demonstrated by the Vietnam War.

14. Emancipated From Mental Slavery: Selected Sayings of Marcus Garvey

Author: by Nnamdi Azikiwe
Published at: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1st edition (October 27, 2013)
ISBN: 978-1491274293

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Right now melanin, the aromatic biopolymer and organic semiconductor that makes Black people black is worth over $380 a gram more than gold. Melanin is worth more than gold, silver, platinum, palladium rhodium and coltan combined. In just a few short years, on August 13, 2020 the Red, Black and Green flag will be celebrated as the colors of all African people.

We also know the song lyric “Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds,” commonly associated with Bob Marley, actually originated with Marcus Garvey. We are going to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery, for though others may free the body, none but ourselves can free the mind.

Those are the words which Marcus Garvey spoke in either October or November 1937.The place? Menelik Hall in Sydney, Nova Scotia. This selection of sayings of the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey, provides an introduction to the mind of a man capable of speaking words into existence which continue to have a profound impact on those who hear them to this very day.

15. Enchiridion (Dover Thrift Editions)

Author: by Epictetus
Published at: Dover Publications; unknown edition (January 15, 2004)
ISBN: 978-0486433592

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Although he was born into slavery and endured a permanent physical disability, Epictetus (ca.50ca. 130 AD) maintained that all people are free to control their lives and to live in harmony with nature. We will always be happy, he argued, if we learn to desire that things should be exactly as they are.

After attaining his freedom, Epictetus spent his entire career teaching philosophy and advising a daily regimen of self-examination. His pupil Arrianus later collected and published the master’s lecture notes; the Enchiridion, or Manual, is a distillation of Epictetus’ teachings and an instructional manual for a tranquil life.

Full of practical advice, this work offers guidelines for those seeking contentment as well as for those who have already made some progress in that direction. Translated by George Long.