Best Gastronomy History Books

Here you will get Best Gastronomy History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Jubilee (Recipes from Two Centuries of African American Cooking)

Author: by Toni Tipton-Martin
Clarkson Potter Publishers
English
320 pages

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A celebration of African American cuisine right now, in all of its abundance and variety. Tejal Rao, The New York Times JAMES BEARD AWARD WINNER IACP AWARD WINNER IACP BOOK OF THE YEAR TONI TIPTON-MARTIN NAMED THE 2021 JULIA CHILD AWARD RECIPIENT NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review The New Yorker NPR Chicago Tribune The Atlantic BuzzFeed Food52 Throughout her career, Toni Tipton-Martin has shed new light on the history, breadth, and depth of African American cuisine.

She’s introduced us to black cooks, some long forgotten, who established much of what’s considered to be our national cuisine. After all, if Thomas Jefferson introduced French haute cuisine to this country, who do you think actually cooked it? In Jubilee, Tipton-Martin brings these masters into our kitchens.

Through recipes and stories, we cook along with these pioneering figures, from enslaved chefs to middle- and upper-class writers and entrepreneurs. With more than 100 recipes, from classics such as Sweet Potato Biscuits, Seafood Gumbo, Buttermilk Fried Chicken, and Pecan Pie with Bourbon to lesser-known but even more decadent dishes like Bourbon & Apple Hot Toddies, Spoon Bread, and Baked Ham Glazed with Champagne, Jubilee presents techniques, ingredients, and dishes that show the roots of African American cookingdeeply beautiful, culturally diverse, fit for celebration.


2. High on the Hog

Author: by Jessica B. Harris
1608194507
Bloomsbury Adult
English

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New York Times bestsellerNow a Netflix Original SeriesThe grande dame of African American cookbooks and winner of the James Beard Lifetime Achievement Award stakes her claim as a culinary historian with a narrative history of African American cuisine. Acclaimed cookbook author Jessica B.

Harris has spent much of her life researching the food and foodways of the African Diaspora. High on the Hog is the culmination of years of her work, and the result is a most engaging history of African American cuisine.

Harris takes the reader on a harrowing journey from Africa across the Atlantic to America, tracking the trials that the people and the food have undergone along the way. From chitlins and ham hocks to fried chicken and vegan soul, Harris celebrates the delicious and restorative foods of the African American experience and details how each came to form such an important part of African American culture, history, and identity.

Although the story of African cuisine in America begins with slavery, High on the Hog ultimately chronicles a thrilling history of triumph and survival. The work of a masterful storyteller and an acclaimed scholar, Jessica B. Harris’s High on the Hog fills an important gap in our culinary history.


3. A History of the World in 6 Glasses

Author: by Tom Standage
Walker Publishing Company
English
336 pages

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The New York Times BestsellerThere aren’t many books this entertaining that also provide a cogent crash course in ancient, classical and modern history. Los Angeles Times Beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and Coca-Cola: In Tom Standage’s deft, innovative account of world history, these six beverages turn out to be much more than just ways to quench thirst.

They also represent six eras that span the course of civilizationfrom the adoption of agriculture, to the birth of cities, to the advent of globalization. A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century through each epoch’s signature refreshment.

As Standage persuasively argues, each drink is in fact a kind of technology, advancing culture and catalyzing the intricate interplay of different societies. After reading this enlightening book, you may never look at your favorite drink in quite the same way again.


4. The Drunken Botanist

Author: by Amy Stewart

Algonquin Books
English
400 pages

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The Essential, New York TimesBestselling Guide to Botany and BoozeA book that makes familiar drinks seem new again … Through this horticultural lens, a mixed drink becomes a cornucopia of plants. NPR’s Morning EditionAmy Stewart has a way of making gardening seem exciting, even a little dangerous.

The New York TimesSake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn.Thirsty yet? In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.

Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaursbut each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history.

This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixologywith more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardenerswill make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.


5. We Are What We Eat: A Slow Food Manifesto

Author: by Alice Waters
English
208 pages
0525561536

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From chef and food activist Alice Waters, an impassioned plea for a radical reconsideration of the way each and every one of us cooks and eatsIn We Are What We Eat, Alice Waters urges us to take up the mantle of slow food culture, the philosophy at the core of her life’s work.

When Waters first opened Chez Panisse in 1971, she did so with the intention of feeding people good food during a time of political turmoil. Customers responded to the locally sourced organic ingredients, to the dishes made by hand, and to the welcoming hospitality that infused the small spacehuman qualities that were disappearing from a country increasingly seduced by takeout, frozen dinners, and prepackaged ingredients.

Waters came to see that the phenomenon of fast food culture, which prioritized cheapness, availability, and speed, was not only ruining our health, but also dehumanizing the ways we live and relate to one another. Over years of working with regional farmers, Waters and her partners learned how geography and seasonal fluctuations affect the ingredients on the menu, as well as about the dangers of pesticides, the plight of fieldworkers, and the social, economic, and environmental threats posed by industrial farming and food distribution.


6. Recipes from the World of Tolkien: Inspired by the Legends

Author: by Robert Tuesley Anderson
English
176 pages
1645174425

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These Lord of the Rings-themed recipes are sure to satisfy Hobbits, Elves, Dwarves…And humans too! If you’ve ever wondered what a Hobbit, an Elf, or a Dwarf might eat in a day’s meals, this cookbook is for you! Whip up some tasty fare with recipes that cover all six mealtimes from the realm of J.R.R.Tolkien.

Divided by the time of day, these recipes use modern ingredients and culinary techniques, and American measurements. A great resource for Lord of the Rings parties, this book is a perfect way to experience real food that tastes like a fantasy!

This work is unofficial and is not authorized by the Tolkien Estate or HarperCollins Publishers.


7. The Negroni: A Love Affair with a Classic Cocktail

Author: by Matt Hranek
Artisan (June 1, 2021)
English
160 pages

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A CENTURY AGO THE COCKTAIL ACHIEVED PERFECTION when, according to legend, Count Camillo Negroni asked his bartender in Florence to stiffen an Americano by replacing the soda water with gin. The world never looked back. With its cosmically simple 1:1:1 ratio, its balance of bitter and sweet, its pleasant kick, its aura of sophistication, the Negroni has bewitched cocktail lovers ever since.

Perhaps none more so than Matt Hranek, who intones this love song to his favorite drink and offers a curated collection of recipes, both the classic and dozens of variations, deviations, and delicious reinterpretations.


8. Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants

Author: by Wolfgang Schivelbusch
Vintage Books
English
256 pages

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From the extravagant use of pepper in the Middle Ages to the Protestant bourgeoisie’s love of coffee to the reason why fashionable Europeans stopped sniffing tobacco and starting smoking it, Schivelbusch looks at how the appetite for pleasure transformed the social structure of the Old World.Illustrations.


9. Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue (A Ferris and Ferris Book)

Author: by Adrian Miller
English
328 pages
1469662809

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Across America, the pure love and popularity of barbecue cookery have gone through the roof. Prepared in one regional style or another, in the South and beyond, barbecue is one of the nation’s most distinctive culinary arts. And people aren’t just eating it; they’re also reading books and articles and watching TV shows about it.

But why is it, asks Adrian Milleradmitted ‘cuehead and longtime certified barbecue judgethat in today’s barbecue culture African Americans don’t get much love? In Black Smoke, Miller chronicles how Black barbecuers, pitmasters, and restauranteurs helped develop this cornerstone of American foodways and how they are coming into their own today.

It’s a smoke-filled story of Black perseverance, culinary innovation, and entrepreneurship. Though often pushed to the margins, African Americans have enriched a barbecue culture that has come to be embraced by all. Miller celebrates and restores the faces and stories of the men and women who have influenced this American cuisine.

10. As Always, Julia: The Letters of Julia Child & Avis DeVoto

Author: by Joan Reardon
B004BXA3BI
December 1, 2010
English

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This revealing correspondence between the legendary French chef Julia Child and her dear friend is a delicious read (People). With her outsize personality, Julia Child is known by her first name alone. But how much do we really know of the inner Julia?

Now more than 200 letters exchanged between Julia and Avis DeVoto, her friend and unofficial literary agent memorably introduced in the hit movie Julie & Julia, open the window on her deepest thoughts and feelings. This riveting correspondence chronicles the blossoming of a unique and lifelong friendship between the two women and the turbulent process of Julia’s creation of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, one of the most influential cookbooks ever written.

Bawdy, funny, exuberant, and occasionally agonized, these letters show Julia, first as a new bride in Paris, then becoming increasingly worldly and adventuresome as she follows her diplomat husband in his postings to Nice, Germany, and Norway. With commentary by food historian Joan Reardon, and covering topics as diverse as the lack of good wine in the United States, McCarthyism, and sexual mores, these letters show America on the verge of political, social, and gastronomic transformation.

11. My Place at the Table: A Recipe for a Delicious Life in Paris

Author: by Alexander Lobrano
English
256 pages
1328588831

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In this debut memoir, a James Beard Awardwinning writer, whose childhood idea of fine dining was Howard Johnson’s, tells how he became one of Paris’s most influential food critics Until Alec Lobrano landed a job in the glamorous Paris office of Women’s Wear Daily, his main experience of French cuisine was the occasional supermarket clair.

An interview with the owner of a renowned cheese shop for his first article nearly proves a disaster because he speaks no French. As he goes on to cover celebrities and couturiers and improves his mastery of the language, he gradually learns what it means to be truly French.

He attends a cocktail party with Yves St. Laurent and has dinner with Giorgio Armani. Over a superb lunch, it’s his landlady who ultimately provides him with a lasting touchstone for how to judge food: you must understand the intentions of the cook.

At the city’s brasseries and bistros, he discovers real French cooking. Through a series of vivid encounters with culinary figures from Paul Bocuse to Julia Child to Ruth Reichl, Lobrano hones his palate and finds his voice. Soon the timid boy from Connecticut is at the epicenter of the Parisian dining revolution and the restaurant critic of one of the largest newspapers in the France.

12. BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts

Author: by Stella Parks
English
400 pages
0393239861

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Winner of the 2018 James Beard Foundation Book Award (Baking and Desserts) A New York Times bestseller and named a Best Baking Book of the Year by the Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, the Chicago Tribune, Bon Apptit, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Mother Jones, the Boston Globe and more “The most groundbreaking book on baking in years.

Full stop.”Saveur From One-Bowl Devil’s Food Layer Cake to a flawless Cherry Pie that’s crisp even on the very bottom, BraveTart is a celebration of classic American desserts. Whether down-home delights like Blueberry Muffins and Glossy Fudge Brownies or supermarket mainstays such as Vanilla Wafers and Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream, your favorites are all here.

These meticulously tested recipes bring an award-winning pastry chef’s expertise into your kitchen, along with advice on how to mix it up with over 200 customizable variationsin short, exactly what you’d expect from a cookbook penned by a senior editor at Serious Eats.

13. Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution

Author: by Terence McKenna
Bantam
English
311 pages

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An exploration of humans’ symbiotic relationships with plants and chemicals presents information on prehistoric partnership societies, the roles of spices and spirits in the rise of dominator societies; and the politics of tobacco, tea, coffee, opium, and alcohol. Why, as a species, are humans so fascinated by altered states of consciousness?

Can altered states reveal something to us about our origins and our place in nature? In Food of the Gods, ethnobotanist Terence McKenna’s research on man’s ancient relationship with chemicals opens a doorway to the divine, and perhaps a solution for saving our troubled world.

McKenna provides a revisionist look at the historical role of drugs in the East and the West, from ancient spice, sugar, and rum trades to marijuana, cocaine, synthetics, and even televisionillustrating the human desire for the food of the gods and the powerful potential to replace abuse of illegal drugs with a shamanic understanding, insistence on community, reverence for nature, and increased self-awareness.

14. The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Author: by Michael Pollan
Penguin (August 28, 2007)
English
450 pages

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“Outstanding …A wide-ranging invitation to think through the moral ramifications of our eating habits.” The New YorkerOne of the New York Times Book Review’s Ten Best Books of the Year and Winner of the James Beard Award Author of How to Change Your Mind and the #1 New York Times Bestseller In Defense of Food and Food RulesWhat should we have for dinner?

Ten years ago, Michael Pollan confronted us with this seemingly simple question and, with The Omnivore’s Dilemma, his brilliant and eye-opening exploration of our food choices, demonstrated that how we answer it today may determine not only our health but our survival as a species.

In the years since, Pollan’s revolutionary examination has changed the way Americans think about food. Bringing wide attention to the little-known but vitally important dimensions of food and agriculture in America, Pollan launched a national conversation about what we eat and the profound consequences that even the simplest everyday food choices have on both ourselves and the natural world.

15. Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well (Lorenzo Da Ponte Italian Library)

Author: by Pellegrino Artusi
English
653 pages

0802086578

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First published in 1891, Pellegrino Artusi’s La scienza in cucina e l’arte di mangier bene has come to be recognized as the most significant Italian cookbook of modern times. It was reprinted thirteen times and had sold more than 52,000 copies in the years before Artusi’s death in 1910, with the number of recipes growing from 475 to 790.

And while this figure has not changed, the book has consistently remained in print. Although Artusi was himself of the upper classes and it was doubtful he had ever touched a kitchen utensil or lit a fire under a pot, he wrote the book not for professional chefs, as was the nineteenth-century custom, but for middle-class family cooks: housewives and their domestic helpers.

His tone is that of a friendly advisor humorous and nonchalant. He indulges in witty anecdotes about many of the recipes, describing his experiences and the historical relevance of particular dishes. Artusi’s masterpiece is not merely a popular cookbook; it is a landmark work in Italian culture.