Best Gay & Lesbian Studies Books

Here you will get Best Gay & Lesbian Studies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government

Author: by David K. Johnson
English
312 pages
0226401901

View on Amazon

Winner of the Randy Shilts Award in Gay Nonfiction*Winner of the Herbert Hoover Book Award in U.S. History*Winner of the Gustavus Myers Book Award in Human RightsNow an award-winning documentary film by Josh Howard, narrated by Glenn CloseThe McCarthy era is generally considered the worst period of political repression in recent American history.

But while the famous question, “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?” resonated in the halls of Congress, security officials were posing another question at least as frequently, if more discreetly: “Information has come to the attention of the Civil Service Commission that you are a homosexual.

What comment do you care to make?”In The Lavender Scare, historian David K. Johnson relates the frightening, untold story of how, during the Cold War, homosexuals were considered as dangerous a threat to national security as Communists. Republican charges that the Roosevelt and Truman administrations were havens for homosexuals proved a potent political weapon, sparking a Lavender Scare more vehement and long-lasting than the more well-known Red Scare.


2. Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others

Author: by Sara Ahmed
English
223 pages
0822339145

View on Amazon

In this groundbreaking work, Sara Ahmed demonstrates how queer studies can put phenomenology to productive use. Focusing on the orientation aspect of sexual orientation and the orient in orientalism, Ahmed examines what it means for bodies to be situated in space and time.

Bodies take shape as they move through the world directing themselves toward or away from objects and others. Being orientated means feeling at home, knowing where one stands, or having certain objects within reach. Orientations affect what is proximate to the body or what can be reached.

A queer phenomenology, Ahmed contends, reveals how social relations are arranged spatially, how queerness disrupts and reorders these relations by not following the accepted paths, and how a politics of disorientation puts other objects within reach, those that might, at first glance, seem awry.

Ahmed proposes that a queer phenomenology might investigate not only how the concept of orientation is informed by phenomenology but also the orientation of phenomenology itself. Thus she reflects on the significance of the objects that appearand those that do notas signs of orientation in classic phenomenological texts such as Husserl’s Ideas.


3. My New Gender Workbook: A Step-by-Step Guide to Achieving World Peace Through Gender Anarchy and Sex Positivity

Author: by Kate Bornstein
Routledge
English
312 pages

View on Amazon

“This updated edition of Bornstein’s formative My Gender Workbook (1997) provides an invigorating introduction to contemporary theory around gender, sexuality, and power. The original is a classic of modern transgender theory and literature and, alongside Bornstein’s other work, has influenced an entire generation of trans writers and artists.

This revised and expanded edition extends that legacy, offering an accessible foundation for examining gender in the reader’s life and in the broader culture while arguing for the dismantling of all forms of oppression. For fans of the original, Bornstein’s new material merits a fresh read…”-Publishers Weekly, starred review Cultural theorists have written loads of smart but difficult-to-fathom texts on gender theory, but most fail to provide a hands-on, accessible guide for those trying to sort out their own sexual identities.

In My Gender Workbook, transgender activist Kate Bornstein brings theory down to Earth and provides a practical approach to living with or without a gender. Bornstein starts from the premise that there are not just two genders performed in today’s world, but countless genders lumped under the two-gender framework.


4. Love Stories: Sex between Men before Homosexuality

Author: by Jonathan Ned Katz
English
426 pages
0226426165

View on Amazon

In Love Stories, Jonathan Ned Katz presents stories of men’s intimacies with men during the nineteenth centuryincluding those of Abraham Lincolndrawing flesh-and-blood portraits of intimate friendships and the ways in which men struggled to name, define, and defend their sexual feelings for one another.

In a world before “gay” and “straight” referred to sexuality, men like Walt Whitman and John Addington Symonds created new ways to name and conceive of their erotic relationships with other men. Katz, diving into history through diaries, letters, newspapers, and poems, offers us a clearer picture than ever before of how men navigated the uncharted territory of male-male desire.


5. The Promise of Happiness

Author: by Sara Ahmed
English
328 pages
0822347253

View on Amazon

The Promise of Happiness is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: I just want you to be happy; I’m happy if you’re happy.

Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the happiness duty, the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in that which is deemed good, and that by being happy ourselves, we will make others happy.

Ahmed maintains that happiness is a promise that directs us toward certain life choices and away from others. Happiness is promised to those willing to live their lives in the right way. Ahmed draws on the intellectual history of happiness, from classical accounts of ethics as the good life, through seventeenth-century writings on affect and the passions, eighteenth-century debates on virtue and education, and nineteenth-century utilitarianism.


6. Forbidden Friendships: Homosexuality and Male Culture in Renaissance Florence (Studies in the History of Sexuality)

Author: by Michael Rocke
Oxford University Press
English
384 pages

View on Amazon

“This is a superb work of scholarship, impossible to overpraise…. It marks a milestone in the 20-year rise of gay and lesbian studies.”-Martin Duberman, The AdvocateThe men of Renaissance Florence were so renowned for sodomy that “Florenzer” in German meant “sodomite.” In the late fifteenth century, as many as one in two Florentine men had come to the attention of the authorities for sodomy by the time they were thirty.

In 1432 The Office of the Night wascreated specifically to police sodomy in Florence. Indeed, nearly all Florentine males probably had some kind of same-sex experience as a part of their “normal” sexual life. Seventy years of denunciations, interrogations, and sentencings left an extraordinarily detailed record, which author Michael Rocke has used in his vivid depiction of this vibrant sexual culture in a world where these same-sex acts were not the deviant transgressions of a small minority, but anintegral part of a normal masculine identity.

Rocke roots this sexual activity in the broader context of Renaissance Florence, with its social networks of families, juvenile gangs, neighbors, patronage, workshops, and confraternities, and its busy political life from the early years of the Republicthrough the period of Lorenzo de’ Medici, Savonarola, and the beginning of Medici princely rule.


7. Monsters in the closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Film (Inside Popular Film)

Author: by Harry Benshoff
0719044731
English
336 pages

View on Amazon

One of the few books to address the horror film from any kind of critical position.. Unique – The first history of the horror film to approach it from a queer perspective.. Written with detail and thoroughness – covers all eras of the horror film and correlates specific types of movie monsters to the historical social conditions which produced them..

Explores how popular culture encodes and demonizes queerness within the generic format of the horror film.


8. Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity (Series Q)

Author: by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
English
208 pages
0822330156

View on Amazon

A pioneer in queer theory and literary studies, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick brings together for the first time in Touching Feeling her most powerful explorations of emotion and expression. In essays that show how her groundbreaking work in queer theory has developed into a deep interest in affect, Sedgwick offers what she calls “tools and techniques for nondualistic thought,” in the process touching and transforming such theoretical discourses as psychoanalysis, speech-act theory, Western Buddhism, and the Foucauldian “hermeneutics of suspicion.” In prose sometimes somber, often high-spirited, and always accessible and moving, Touching Feeling interrogatesthrough virtuoso readings of works by Henry James, J.L.

Austin, Judith Butler, the psychologist Silvan Tomkins and othersemotion in many forms. What links the work of teaching to the experience of illness? How can shame become an engine for queer politics, performance, and pleasure? Is sexuality more like an affect or a drive?

Is paranoia the only realistic epistemology for modern intellectuals? Ultimately, Sedgwick’s unfashionable commitment to the truth of happiness propels a book as open-hearted as it is intellectually daring.


9. Finding Out: An Introduction to LGBTQ Studies

Author: by Jonathan F. Alexander
1506337406
SAGE Publications, Inc
English

View on Amazon

The new Third Edition of Finding Out: An Introduction to LGBTQ Studies provides readers with an accessible and riveting introduction to LGBTQ (lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender-queer) studies. Designed as a combination of introductory text and reader, Finding Out helps students understand the growth and development of LGBTQ identities and the interdisciplinary nature of sexuality studies.

The book combines comprehensive introductory and explanatory material with primary source readings. The authors provide context (from history, literature and the arts, media, politics, and more) to form a coherent framework for understanding the included debates and readings. Going beyond simply providing a historical account, this easy-to-follow text offers an in-depth examination of LGBTQ culture and societymaking LGBTQ studies a central part of your course coverage.

10. No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (Series Q)

Author: by Lee Edelman
0822333694
English
208 pages

View on Amazon

In this searing polemic, Lee Edelman outlines a radically uncompromising new ethics of queer theory. His main target is the all-pervasive figure of the child, which he reads as the linchpin of our universal politics of reproductive futurism. Edelman argues that the child, understood as innocence in need of protection, represents the possibility of the future against which the queer is positioned as the embodiment of a relentlessly narcissistic, antisocial, and future-negating drive.

He boldly insists that the efficacy of queerness lies in its very willingness to embrace this refusal of the social and political order. In No Future, Edelman urges queers to abandon the stance of accommodation and accede to their status as figures for the force of a negativity that he links with irony, jouissance, and, ultimately, the death drive itself.

Closely engaging with literary texts, Edelman makes a compelling case for imagining Scrooge without Tiny Tim and Silas Marner without little Eppie. Looking to Alfred Hitchcock’s films, he embraces two of the director’s most notorious creations: the sadistic Leonard of North by Northwest, who steps on the hand that holds the couple precariously above the abyss, and the terrifying title figures of The Birds, with their predilection for children.

11. Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability (Cultural Front, 9)

Author: by Robert McRuer
NYU Press (June 1, 2006)
English
301 pages

View on Amazon

A bold and contemporary discourse of the intersection of disability studies and queer studiesCrip Theory attends to the contemporary cultures of disability and queerness that are coming out all over. Both disability studies and queer theory are centrally concerned with how bodies, pleasures, and identities are represented as normal or as abject, but Crip Theory is the first book to analyze thoroughly the ways in which these interdisciplinary fields inform each other.

Drawing on feminist theory, African American and Latino/a cultural theories, composition studies, film and television studies, and theories of globalization and counter-globalization, Robert McRuer articulates the central concerns of crip theory and considers how such a critical perspective might impact cultural and historical inquiry in the humanities.

Crip Theory puts forward readings of the Sharon Kowalski story, the performance art of Bob Flanagan, and the journals of Gary Fisher, as well as critiques of the domesticated queerness and disability marketed by the Millennium March, or Bravo TV’s Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.

12. Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality: Gay People in Western Europe from the Beginning of the Christian Era to the Fourteenth Century

Author: by John Boswell
English
456 pages
022634522X

View on Amazon

John Boswell’s National Book Awardwinning study of the history of attitudes toward homosexuality in the early Christian West was a groundbreaking work that challenged preconceptions about the Church’s past relationship to its gay membersamong them priests, bishops, and even saintswhen it was first published thirty-five years ago.

The historical breadth of Boswell’s research (from the Greeks to Aquinas) and the variety of sources consulted make this one of the most extensive treatments of any single aspect of Western social history. Now in this thirty-fifth anniversary edition with a new foreword by leading queer and religious studies scholar Mark D.

Jordan, Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality is still fiercely relevant. This landmark book helped form the disciplines of gay and gender studies, and it continues to illuminate the origins and operations of intolerance as a social force.

13. Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity (Sexual Cultures, 13)

Author: by Jose Esteban Munoz
NYU Press
English
244 pages

View on Amazon

The LGBT agenda for too long has been dominated by pragmatic issues like same-sex marriage and gays in the military. It has been stifled by this myopic focus on the present, which is short-sighted and assimilationist. Cruising Utopia seeks to break the present stagnancy by cruising ahead.

Drawing on the work of Ernst Bloch, Jose Esteban Munoz recalls the queer past for guidance in presaging its future. He considers the work of seminal artists and writers such as Andy Warhol, LeRoi Jones, Frank O’Hara, Ray Johnson, Fred Herko, Samuel Delany, and Elizabeth Bishop, alongside contemporary performance and visual artists like Dynasty Handbag, My Barbarian, Luke Dowd, Tony Just, and Kevin McCarty in order to decipher the anticipatory illumination of art and its uncanny ability to open windows to the future.

In a startling repudiation of what the LGBT movement has held dear, Munoz contends that queerness is instead a futurity bound phenomenon, a “not yet here” that critically engages pragmatic presentism. Part manifesto, part love-letter to the past and the future, Cruising Utopia argues that the here and now are not enough and issues an urgent call for the revivification of the queer political imagination.

14. Epistemology of the Closet, Updated with a New Preface

Author: by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
English
280 pages
0520254066

View on Amazon

Since the late 1980s, queer studies and theory have become vital to the intellectual and political life of the United States. This has been due, in no small degree, to the influence of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s critically acclaimed Epistemology of the Closet.

Working from classic texts of European and American writersincluding Melville, James, Nietzsche, Proust, and WildeSedgwick analyzes a turn-of-the-century historical moment in which sexual orientation became as important a demarcation of personhood as gender had been for centuries. In her preface to this updated edition Sedgwick places the book both personally and historically, looking specifically at the horror of the first wave of the AIDS epidemic and its influence on the text.

15. Gossip Men: J. Edgar Hoover, Joe McCarthy, Roy Cohn, and the Politics of Insinuation

Author: by Christopher M. Elias
English
288 pages
022662482X

View on Amazon

J.Edgar Hoover, Joseph McCarthy, and Roy Cohn were titanic figures in midcentury America, wielding national power in government and the legal system through intimidation and insinuation. Hoover’s FBI thrived on secrecy, threats, and illegal surveillance, while McCarthy and Cohn will forever be associated with the infamous anticommunist smear campaign of the early 1950s, which culminated in McCarthy’s public disgrace during televised Senate hearings.

In Gossip Men, Christopher M. Elias takes a probing look at these tarnished figures to reveal a host of startling new connections among gender, sexuality, and national security in twentieth-century American politics. Elias illustrates how these three men solidified their power through the skillful use of deliberately misleading techniques like implication, hyperbole, and photographic manipulation.

Just as provocatively, he shows that the American people of the 1950s were particularly primed to accept these coded threats because they were already familiar with such tactics from widely popular gossip magazines. By using gossip as a lens to examine profound issues of state security and institutional power, Elias thoroughly transforms our understanding of the development of modern American political culture.