Best Greenland History Books

Here you will get Best Greenland History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Uncovering Norse Mythology: A Guide Into Norse Gods and Goddesses, Viking Warriors and Magical Creatures

Author: by Lucas Russo
B0917HVK3M
English
196 pages

View on Amazon

Delve into the fascinating history of Norse mythology with these thrilling tales of battle and magic What do you think of when you hear the words “Norse mythology”? Chances are, your mind goes straight to Thor or Odin, some of the most well-known Nordic gods.

But their stories barely scratch the surface of the complicated and fascinating myths of ancient Scandinavia. As Germanic tribes clashed and reconciled, a rich and detailed realm of the gods was created through the melding and exchanging of stories and characters that reflected the complicated historical events around them.

The clash of the Vanir and the Aesir, or the old and new gods, is thought to be indicative of a real conflict between two tribes that later found a way to coexist. Through developing an understanding of the stories that remain, you will learn about the intricacies of ancient Nordic culture.

Beginning with the historical background of the Viking Age, you will become familiar with the creation myth and discover the complicated family trees that the gods and goddesses of Asgard created. You’ll uncover the most important figures in Nordic culture and find out how their existence continues to be relevant in the modern day.


2. Uncovering Greek Mythology: A Beginner's Guide into the World of Greek Gods and Goddesses

Author: by Lucas Russo
B08QBY9HXR
English
150 pages

View on Amazon

Get to know the Greek gods and goddesses, from the mighty Zeus, to the temperamental Poseidon, the beautiful Aphrodite, and every character from A to Z. Who were the Olympians, and where did they come from? Why were the Titans overthrown?

How did these and other mythology tales shape Greek culture and civilization? Scholars have long been fascinated by the Greeks, and even today we are entertained by the stories of their mythology and pantheon. The Greeks developed an entire religion around powerful, vengeful gods, benevolent yet fierce goddesses, and bizarre couplings that created some of the strangest creatures in the world’s mythologies.

Who wouldn’t want to hear about Zeus and his command of lightning, Hades and how he found his bride, the wisdom of Athena, and so many other stories that capture the imagination. These stories can do more than just entertain; they can also inspire and teach us lessons that were penned by the Greeks themselves.

Starting with the creation myth, this book will take you through the stories of the Titans, introduce the Olympians, bring in the demigods, and sneak a peek at the monsters that made up the mythology. You’ll learn who all the gods and goddesses were in relation to one another, mythological explanations for natural events, and why any of this still matters today.


3. In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette

Author: by Hampton Sides
Anchor
English
480 pages

View on Amazon

A Best Book of the Year USA Today * Time Magazine * Washington Post * Miami Herald * Richmond Times Dispatch * Christian Science Monitor * Daily Beast * Minneapolis Star Tribune On July 8, 1879, Captain George Washington De Long and his team of thirty-two men set sail from San Francisco on the USS Jeanette.

Heading deep into uncharted Arctic waters, they carried the aspirations of a young country burning to be the first nation to reach the North Pole. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the Jeannette’s hull was breached by an impassable stretch of pack ice, forcing the crew to abandon ship amid torrents of rushing of water.

Hours later, the ship had sunk below the surface, marooning the men a thousand miles north of Siberia, where they faced a terrifying march with minimal supplies across the endless ice pack. Enduring everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and labyrinths of ice, the crew battled madness and starvation as they struggled desperately to survive.


4. DK Eyewitness Denmark (Travel Guide)

Author: by DK Eyewitness
DK Eyewitness Travel
English
288 pages

View on Amazon

Whether you want to adventure like a Viking, sample cutting-edge cuisine in Copenhagen, or practice the art of hygge, your DK Eyewitness travel guide makes sure you experience all that Denmark has to offer. Effortlessly cool and bursting with charisma, Denmark is synonymous with stylish design, modern art and progressive politics.

From the captivating cities to the far-flung corners, each region of Denmark boasts its own distinct personality guaranteed to enthral visitors. Our regularly updated guide brings Denmark to life, transporting you there like no other travel guide does with expert-led insights and advice, detailed information on all the must-see sights, inspiring photography, and our trademark illustrations.

You’ll discover: our pick of Denmark’s must-sees, top experiences, and hidden gems- the best spots to eat, drink, shop, and stay- detailed maps and walks which make navigating the country easy- easy-to-follow itineraries- expert advice: get ready, get around, and stay safe- color-coded chapters to every part of Denmark, including Copenhagen, Northwestern Zealand, Southern Zealand and the Islands, Funen, Southern and Central Jutland, Northern Jutland, Bornholm and Greenland and the Faroe Islands- our new lightweight format, so you can take it with you wherever you goWant the best of Copenhagen in your pocket?


5. The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia

Author: by Michael Booth
Picador
English
400 pages

View on Amazon

The Christian Science Monitor’s #1 Best Book of the YearA witty, informative, and popular travelogue about the Scandinavian countries and how they may not be as happy or as perfect as we assume, The Almost Nearly Perfect People offers up the ideal mixture of intriguing and revealing facts (Laura Miller, Salon).

Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than ten years, and he has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely book he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success, and, most intriguing of all, what they think of one another.

Why are the Danes so happy, despite having the highest taxes? Do the Finns really have the best education system? Are the Icelanders as feral as they sometimes appear? How are the Norwegians spending their fantastic oil wealth? And why do all of them hate the Swedes?


6. Iceland: Land of the Sagas

Author: by Jon Krakauer
Villard (October 6, 1998)
English
160 pages

View on Amazon

“We raised our fists and cheered…. With the sagas in our heads, with Iceland at its wildest beneath our boots, it would not have been impossible to see Brdr clumping along the summit ridge, prodding the glacier with his staff, ready to show us the way down.”Iceland is a pictorial classic on one of the last “undiscovered” countries in Europe-reissued for the first time in paperback.

Iceland is often thought to be covered by ice, but in fact it is gloriously green. Lush meadows, wildflower fields, and miles of rich tundra cover a landscape of remarkable variety: deep lakes, bubbling hot springs, tumbling waterfalls, snow-capped mountains.

It’s also a landscape amazingly alive with massive lava flows and enormous glaciers. The human story of Iceland goes back more than eleven thousand years, and its heritage is told here in a treasury of riveting sagas of real-life heroes and all manner of supernatural beings.

Both the land and the people of one of Europe’s most gorgeous countries come to life in this colorful account of the authors’ adventures as they walk, climb, and photograph their way through Iceland and connect to the bone-chilling sagas and the unfamiliar terrain.


7. The Far Traveler: Voyages of a Viking Woman

Author: by Nancy Marie Brown
Mariner Books
English
320 pages

View on Amazon

Five hundred years before Columbus, a Viking woman named Gudrid sailed off the edge of the known world. She landed in the New World and lived there for three years, giving birth to a baby before sailing home. Or so the Icelandic sagas say.

Even after archaeologists found a Viking longhouse in Newfoundland, no one believed that the details of Gudrid’s story were true. Then, in 2001, a team of scientists discovered what may have been this pioneering woman’s last house, buried under a hay field in Iceland, just where the sagas suggested it could be.

Joining scientists experimenting with cutting-edge technology and the latest archaeological techniques, and tracing Gudrid’s steps on land and in the sagas, Nancy Marie Brown reconstructs a life that spannedand expandedthe bounds of the then-known world. She also sheds new light on the society that gave rise to a woman even more extraordinary than legend has painted her and illuminates the reasons for its collapse.


8. Woven into the Earth: Textile finds in Norse Greenland (None)

Author: by Else OSTERGAARD
Aarhus University Press
English
256 pages

View on Amazon

One of the century’s most spectacular archaeological finds occurred in 1921, a year before Howard Carter stumbled upon Tutankhamun’s tomb, when Poul Norlund recovered dozens of garments from a graveyard in the Norse settlement of Herjolfsnaes, Greenland. Preserved intact for centuries by the permafrost, these mediaeval garments display remarkable similarities to western European costumes of the time.

Previously, such costumes were known only from contemporary illustrations, and the Greenland finds provided the world with a close look at how ordinary Europeans dressed in the Middle Ages. Fortunately for Norlund’s team, wood has always been extremely scarce in Greenland, and instead of caskets, many of the bodies were found swaddled in multiple layers of cast off clothing.

When he wrote about the excavation later, Norlund also described how occasional thaws had permitted crowberry and dwarf willow to establish themselves in the top layers of soil. Their roots grew through coffins, clothing and corpses alike, binding them together in a vast network of thin fibers – as if, he wrote, the finds had been literally sewn in the earth.


9. Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga

Author: by William F. Fitzhugh
1560989955
English
432 pages

View on Amazon

Replete with color photographs, drawings, and maps of Viking sites, artifacts, and landscapes, this book celebrates and explores the Viking saga from the combined perspectives of history, archaeology, oral tradition, literature, and natural science. The book’s contributors chart the spread of marauders and traders in Europe as well as the expansion of farmers and explorers throughout the North Atlantic and into the New World.

They show that Norse contacts with Native American groups were more extensive than has previously been believed, but that the outnumbered Europeans never established more than temporary settlements in North America.

10. Medieval Garments Reconstructed: Norse Clothing Patterns

Author: by Lilli Fransen

Aarhus University Press
English
143 pages

View on Amazon

This volume begins with a short introduction by Else Ostergard to the amazing finds of garments from the Norse settlement of Herjolfnes in Greenland. It then features chapters on technique – production of the thread, dyeing, weaving techniques, cutting and sewing – by Anna Norgard.

Also included are measurements and drawings of garments, hoods, and stockings, with sewing instructions, by Lilli Fransen. A practical guide to making your own Norse garment!

11. The Sledge Patrol: A WWII Epic Of Escape, Survival, And Victory

Author: by David Howarth
Lyons Press
English
240 pages

View on Amazon

In 1943, a group of brave Danish and Norwegian hunters carried out one of the most dramatic operations of World War II. Using dogsleds to patrol a stark 500-mile stretch of the Greenland coast, their wartime mission was to guard against Nazi interlopersan unlikely scenario given the cruel climate.

But one day, a footprint was spotted on desolate Sabine Island, along with other obvious signs of the enemy. Not expecting to find the trouble they did, the three Sledge Patrol members escaped to the nearest hunting hut only to have the Germans pursue them on foot.

In the dead of the Arctic night, the men escaped capture at the last instant and, without their coats or sled dogs, walked fifty-six miles to get back to base. While the Sledge Patrol had only hunting rifles, resilience, and their knowledge of outdoor survival, the Germans were armed with machine guns and grenades and greatly outnumbered them.

David Howarth skillfully relates the tensely exciting true tale of how the men of the Sledge Patrol fought capture or death in desolation by outwitting and outlasting the enemy. This is a saga of human skill, faith, and enduranceand one of the most remarkable Allied victories ever recorded.

12. The Little Book of the Icelanders in the Old Days

Author: by Alda Sigmundsdottir
B00L8A3F1M
June 22, 2014
English

View on Amazon

Iceland in centuries past was a formidable place to live. Situated in the North Atlantic Ocean, on the edge of the inhabitable world, the nation was both isolated and abjectly poor. Centuries of colonisation translated into oppression and subjugation from the colonial overlords, and a hostile climate and repeated natural disasters meant that mere survival was a challenge to even the hardiest of souls.

In these 50 miniature essays, Alda Sigmundsdottir writes about the Icelanders in centuries past in a light and humourous way, yet never without admiration and respect for the resilience and strength they showed in coping with conditions of adversity that are barely imaginable today.

Their ways of interacting with the natural world are described, as are their sometimes tragic, sometimes ingenious, means of dealing with maltreatment and injustice from the church and other rulers. These forms of oppression include a trade monopoly imposed by Denmark that lasted nearly two centuries, a ban on dancing that lasted for a similar length of time, the forced dissolution of households when the breadwinner of the family died, the tyranny of merchants granted exclusive right to trade with the Icelanders, and the dreaded decrees of the Grand Judgement – a court of law that was set up to punish various offenses, real or imagined.

13. Saga Land: The Island of Stories at the Edge of the World: The Island Stories at the Edge of the World

Author: by Richard Fidler
English
0733339700
978-0733339707

View on Amazon

A new friendship.An unforgettable journey. A beautiful and bloody history. This is Iceland as you’ve never read it before … Broadcaster Richard Fidler and author Kri Gslason are good friends. They share a deep attachment to the sagas of Iceland – the true stories of the first Viking families who settled on that remote island in the Middle Ages.

These are tales of blood feuds, of dangerous women, and people who are compelled to kill the ones they love the most. The sagas are among the greatest stories ever written, but the identity of their authors is largely unknown.

Together, Richard and Kri travel across Iceland, to the places where the sagas unfolded a thousand years ago. They cross fields, streams and fjords to immerse themselves in the folklore of this fiercely beautiful island. And there is another mission: to resolve a longstanding family mystery – a gift from Kari’s Icelandic father that might connect him to the greatest of the saga authors.

14. Strangers & Natives: A Newspaper Narrative of Early Jewish America 1734 -1869

Author: by Ron Rubin
English
232 pages
1602803285

View on Amazon

Foreword by Jonathan D. Sarna Developed by Peri Devaney Strangers and Natives: A Newspaper Narrative of Early Jewish America, 1734 – 1869 focuses on the daily life and customs of the Jewish community and the Jewish people; the formation of Jewish congregations and organizations; and the involvement of Jews in education, literature, journalism, politics, the marketplace, the military, and history itself.

While there are numerous historical accounts of early American Jewry quoting documents, diaries and memoirs, this is the first that uses periodicals from that time period. Using scans of the original newsprint, most from the author s own extensive collection, Strangers and Natives displays the actual written words – the first blush of history – in visual form.

15. The Valkyries’ Loom: The Archaeology of Cloth Production and Female Power in the North Atlantic

Author: by Michèle Hayeur Smith
English
236 pages
081306662X

View on Amazon

In The Valkyries’ Loom, Michle Hayeur Smith examines Viking textiles as evidence of the little-known work of women in the Norse colonies that expanded from Scandinavia across the North Atlantic in the ninth century AD. While previous researchers have overlooked textiles as insignificant artifacts, Hayeur Smith is the first to use them to understand gender and economy in Norse societies of the North Atlantic.

This groundbreaking study is based on the author’s systematic comparative analysis of the vast textile collections in Iceland, Greenland, Denmark, Scotland, and the Faroe Islands, materials that are largely unknown even to archaeologists and span 1,000 years. Through these garments and fragments, Hayeur Smith provides new insights into how the women of these island nations influenced international trade by producing cloth (vaml); how they shaped the development of national identities by creating clothing; and how they helped their communities survive climate change by reengineering clothes during the Little Ice Age.