Best History & Philosophy of Science Books

Here you will get Best History & Philosophy of Science Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants

Author: by Robin Wall Kimmerer
Milkweed Editions
English
408 pages

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A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Named a “Best Essay Collection of the Decade” by Literary Hub As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers.

In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beingsasters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrassoffer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices.

In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world.


2. Mercury Rising: John Glenn, John Kennedy, and the New Battleground of the Cold War

Author: by Jeff Shesol
English
416 pages
1324003243

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One of the Washington Post’s 20 Books to Read This Summer A riveting history of the epic orbital flight that put America back into the space race. If the United States couldn’t catch up to the Soviets in space, how could it compete with them on Earth?

That was the question facing John F. Kennedy at the height of the Cold Wara perilous time when the Soviet Union built the wall in Berlin, tested nuclear bombs more destructive than any in history, and beat the United States to every major milestone in space.

The race to the heavens seemed a race for survivaland America was losing. On February 20, 1962, when John Glenn blasted into orbit aboard Friendship 7, his mission was not only to circle the planet; it was to calm the fears of the free world and renew America’s sense of self-belief.

Mercury Rising re-creates the tension and excitement of a flight that shifted the momentum of the space race and put the United States on the path to the moon. Drawing on new archival sources, personal interviews, and previously unpublished notes by Glenn himself, Mercury Rising reveals how the astronaut’s heroics lifted the nation’s hopes in what Kennedy called the “hour of maximum danger.” 16 pages of illustrations


3. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Author: by Rebecca Skloot
1400052181
Crown (March 8, 2011)
English

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The story of modern medicine and bioethicsand, indeed, race relationsis refracted beautifully, and movingly. Entertainment WeeklyNOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE FROM HBO STARRING OPRAH WINFREY AND ROSE BYRNE ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL (CNN), DEFINING (LITHUB), AND BEST (THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER) BOOKS OF THE DECADE ONE OF ESSENCE’S 50 MOST IMPACTFUL BLACK BOOKS OF THE PAST 50 YEARS WINNER OF THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE HEARTLAND PRIZE FOR NONFICTIONNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review Entertainment Weekly O: The Oprah Magazine NPR Financial Times New York Independent (U.K.Times (U.K.

Publishers Weekly Library Journal Kirkus Reviews Booklist Globe and MailHer name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cellstaken without her knowledgebecame one of the most important tools in medicine: The first immortal human cells grown in culture, which are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.


4. American Sherlock: Murder, Forensics, and the Birth of American CSI

Author: by Kate Winkler Dawson
G.P. Putnam's Sons
English
336 pages

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A gripping historical true crime narrative that “reads like the best of Conan Doyle himself” (Karen Abbott, author of The Ghosts of Eden Park), American Sherlock recounts the riveting true story of the birth of modern criminal investigation. Berkeley, California, 1933.

In a lab filled with curiosities-beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books-sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the “American Sherlock Holmes,” Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America’s greatest-and first-forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural.

Heinrich was one of the nation’s first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence.


5. Elegant Defense, An: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System: A Tale in Four Lives

Author: by Matt Richtel
William Morrow Paperbacks
English
448 pages

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National Bestseller”A valuable read that will help you understand what it takes to stop COVID-19. A super interesting look at the science of immunity. Bill Gates, Gates Notes Summer Reading ListThe Pulitzer Prizewinning New York Times journalist “explicates for the lay reader the intricate biology of our immune system” (Jerome Groopman, MD, New York Review of Books)From New York Times science journalist Matt Richtel, An Elegant Defense is an acclaimed and definitive exploration of the immune system and the secrets of health.

Interweaving cutting-edge science with the intimate stories of four individual patients, this epic, first-of-its-kind book give[s] lay readers a means of understanding what’s known so far about the intricate biology of our immune systems (The Week). The immune system is our body’s essential defense network, a guardian vigilantly fighting illness, healing wounds, maintaining order and balance, and keeping us alive.

It has been honed by evolution over millennia to face an almost infinite array of threats. For all its astonishing complexity, however, the immune system can be easily compromised by fatigue, stress, toxins, advanced age, and poor nutritionhallmarks of modern lifeand even by excessive hygiene.


6. Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe

Author: by Brian Greene

B07S3RJ6HP
February 18, 2020
English

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New York Times Bestseller A captivating exploration of deep time and humanity’s search for purpose, from the world-renowned physicist and best-selling author of The Elegant Universe.”Few humans share Greene’s mastery of both the latest cosmological science and English prose.”The New York Times (A Notable Book of 2020) Until the End of Time is Brian Greene’s breathtaking new exploration of the cosmos and our quest to find meaning in the face of this vast expanse.

Greene takes us on a journey from the big bang to the end of time, exploring how lasting structures formed, how life and mind emerged, and how we grapple with our existence through narrative, myth, religion, creative expression, science, the quest for truth, and a deep longing for the eternal.

From particles to planets, consciousness to creativity, matter to meaningBrian Greene allows us all to grasp and appreciate our fleeting but utterly exquisite moment in the cosmos.


7. A Short History of Nearly Everything

Author: by Bill Bryson
Crown
English
544 pages

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One of the world’s most beloved writers and New York Times bestselling author of A Walk in the Woods and The Body takes his ultimate journeyinto the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trailwell, most of it.

In A Sunburned Country, he confronted some of the most lethal wildlife Australia has to offer. Now, in his biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understandand, if possible, answerthe oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves.

Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps.

He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.


8. Return of the God Hypothesis: Three Scientific Discoveries That Reveal the Mind Behind the Universe

Author: by Stephen C. Meyer
HarperOne (March 30, 2021)
English
576 pages

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The New York Times bestselling author of Darwin’s Doubt presents groundbreaking scientific evidence of the existence of God, based on breakthroughs in physics, cosmology, and biology. Beginning in the late 19th century, many intellectuals began to insist that scientific knowledge conflicts with traditional theistic beliefthat science and belief in God are at war.

Philosopher of science Stephen Meyer challenges this view by examining three scientific discoveries with decidedly theistic implications. Building on the case for the intelligent design of life that he developed in Signature in the Cell and Darwin’s Doubt, Meyer demonstrates how discoveries in cosmology and physics coupled with those in biology help to establish the identity of the designing intelligence behind life and the universe.

Meyer argues that theismwith its affirmation of a transcendent, intelligent and active creatorbest explains the evidence we have concerning biological and cosmological origins. Previously Meyer refrained from attempting to answer questions about who might have designed life. Now he provides an evidence-based answer to perhaps the ultimate mystery of the universe.


9. Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer

Author: by Steven Johnson
English
320 pages
0525538852

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Offers a useful reminder of the role of modern science in fundamentally transforming all of our lives. President Barack Obama (on Twitter) An important book. Steven Pinker, The New York Times Book Review Now also a PBS documentary series: the surprising story of how humans gained what amounts to an extra life, from the bestselling author of How We Got to Now and Where Good Ideas Come From As a species we have doubled our life expectancy in just one hundred years.

All the advances of modern lifethe medical breakthroughs, the public health institutions, the rising standards of livinghave given us each about twenty thousand extra days on average. There are few measures of human progress more astonishing than our increased longevity.

This book is Steven Johnson’s attempt to understand where that progress came from. How many of those extra twenty thousand days came from vaccines, or the decrease in famines, or seatbelts? What are the forces that now keep us alive longer?

Behind each breakthrough lies an inspiring story of cooperative innovation, of brilliant thinkers bolstered by strong systems of public support and collaborative networks. But it is not enough simply to remind ourselves that progress is possible. How do we avoid decreases in life expectancy as our public health systems face unprecedented challenges?

10. The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

Author: by Carl Sagan
Ballantine Books

‎ English
457 pages

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A prescient warning of a future we now inhabit, where fake news stories and Internet conspiracy theories play to a disaffected American populaceA glorious book … A spirited defense of science … From the first page to the last, this book is a manifesto for clear thought.

Los Angeles Times How can we make intelligent decisions about our increasingly technology-driven lives if we don’t understand the difference between the myths of pseudoscience and the testable hypotheses of science? Pulitzer Prize-winning author and distinguished astronomer Carl Sagan argues that scientific thinking is critical not only to the pursuit of truth but to the very well-being of our democratic institutions.

Casting a wide net through history and culture, Sagan examines and authoritatively debunks such celebrated fallacies of the past as witchcraft, faith healing, demons, and UFOs. And yet, disturbingly, in today’s so-called information age, pseudoscience is burgeoning with stories of alien abduction, channeling past lives, and communal hallucinations commanding growing attention and respect.

11. Projections: A Story of Human Emotions

Author: by Karl Deisseroth
English
256 pages
1984853694

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A groundbreaking tour of the human mind that illuminates the biological nature of our inner worlds and emotions, through gripping, movingand, at times, harrowingclinical storiesPoetic, mind-stretching, and through it all, deeply human. Daniel Levitin, New York Times bestselling author of The Organized MindKarl Deisseroth has spent his life pursuing truths about the human mind, both as a renowned clinical psychiatrist and as a researcher creating and developing the revolutionary field of optogenetics, which uses light to help decipher the brain’s workings.

In Projections, he combines his knowledge of the brain’s inner circuitry with a deep empathy for his patients to examine what mental illness reveals about the human mind and the origin of human feelingshow the broken can illuminate the unbroken.

Through cutting-edge research and gripping case studies from Deisseroth’s own patients, Projections tells a larger story about the material origins of human emotion, bridging the gap between the ancient circuits of our brain and the poignant moments of suffering in our daily lives.

12. A Brief History of Time

Author: by Stephen Hawking
0553380168
Bantam
English

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERA landmark volume in science writing by one of the great minds of our time, Stephen Hawking’s book explores such profound questions as: How did the universe beginand what made its start possible? Does time always flow forward?

Is the universe unendingor are there boundaries? Are there other dimensions in space? What will happen when it all ends? Told in language we all can understand, A Brief History of Time plunges into the exotic realms of black holes and quarks, of antimatter and arrows of time, of the big bang and a bigger Godwhere the possibilities are wondrous and unexpected.

With exciting images and profound imagination, Stephen Hawking brings us closer to the ultimate secrets at the very heart of creation.

13. 1493: How Europe's Discovery of the Americas Revolutionized Trade, Ecology and Life on Earth

Author: by Charles C. Mann
B005WJ4LO0
September 15, 2011
English

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Two hundred million years ago the earth consisted of a single vast continent, Pangea, surrounded by a great planetary sea. Continental drift tore apart Pangaea, and for millennia the hemispheres were separate, evolving almost entirely different suites of plants and animals.

Columbus’s arrival in the Americas brought together these long-separate worlds. Many historians believe that this collision of ecosystems and cultures – the Columbian Exchange – was the most consequential event in human history since the Neolithic Revolution. And it was the most consequential event in biological history since the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Beginning with the world of microbes and moving up the species ladder to mankind, Mann rivetingly describes the profound effect this exchanging of species had on the culture of both continents.

14. Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

Author: by Rachel Ignotofsky
Ten Speed Press
English
128 pages

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It’s a scientific fact: Women rock! A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times best seller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world.

Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

Women in Science celebrates the achievements of the intrepid women who have paved the way for the next generation of female engineers, biologists, mathematicians, doctors, astronauts, physicists, and more! BrainPickings – Best Science Books of the Year

15. The Reason for the Darkness of the Night: Edgar Allan Poe and the Forging of American Science

Author: by John Tresch
English
448 pages
0374247854

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One of The Christian Science Monitor’s ten best books of JuneAn innovative biography of Edgar Allan Poehighlighting his fascination and feuds with science. Decade after decade, Edgar Allan Poe remains one of the most popular American writers. He is beloved around the world for his pioneering detective fiction, tales of horror, and haunting, atmospheric verse.

But what if there was another side to the man who wrote The Raven and The Fall of the House of Usher? In The Reason for the Darkness of the Night, John Tresch offers a bold new biography of a writer whose short, tortured life continues to fascinate.

Shining a spotlight on an era when the lines separating entertainment, speculation, and scientific inquiry were blurred, Tresch reveals Poe’s obsession with science and lifelong ambition to advance and question human knowledge. Even as he composed dazzling works of fiction, he remained an avid and often combative commentator on new discoveries, publishing and hustling in literary scenes that also hosted the era’s most prominent scientists, semi-scientists, and pseudo-intellectual rogues.