Best Slavery & Emancipation History Books

Here you will get Best Slavery & Emancipation History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Caste (Oprah's Book Club): The Origins of Our Discontents

Author: by Isabel Wilkerson
Random House
English
496 pages

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLIST An instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far. Dwight Garner, The New York TimesThe Pulitzer Prizewinning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions.

NAMED THE #1 NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BY TIME, ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People The Washington Post Publishers Weekly AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review O: The Oprah Magazine NPR Bloomberg Christian Science Monitor New York Post The New York Public Library Fortune Smithsonian Magazine Marie Claire Town & Country Slate Library Journal Kirkus Reviews LibraryReads PopMattersWinner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Finalist PEN/Jean Stein Book Award LonglistAs we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance.


2. Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth

Author: by Bryan Burrough
English
416 pages
1984880098

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Lively and absorbing.. .” The New York Times Book Review”Engrossing.” Wall Street JournalEntertaining and well-researched … Houston Chronicle Three noted Texan writers combine forces to tell the real story of the Alamo, dispelling the myths, exploring why they had their day for so long, and explaining why the ugly fight about its meaning is now coming to a head.

Every nation needs its creation myth, and since Texas was a nation before it was a state, it’s no surprise that its myths bite deep. There’s no piece of history more important to Texans than the Battle of the Alamo, when Davy Crockett and a band of rebels went down in a blaze of glory fighting for independence from Mexico, losing the battle but setting Texas up to win the war.

However, that version of events, as Forget the Alamo definitively shows, owes more to fantasy than reality. Just as the site of the Alamo was left in ruins for decades, its story was forgotten and twisted over time, with the contributions of Tejanos-Texans of Mexican origin, who fought alongside the Anglo rebels-scrubbed from the record, and the origin of the conflict over Mexico’s push to abolish slavery papered over.


3. Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II

Author: by Douglas A. Blackmon
Anchor
English
496 pages

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This groundbreaking historical expose unearths the lost stories of enslaved persons and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude shortly thereafter in The Age of Neoslavery. By turns moving, sobering, and shocking, this unprecedented Pulitzer Prize-winning account reveals the stories of those who fought unsuccessfully against the re-emergence of human labor trafficking, the companies that profited most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

Following the Emancipation Proclamation, convictsmostly black menwere leased through forced labor camps operated by state and federal governments. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history.

An astonishing book…. It will challenge and change your understanding of what we were as Americansand of what we are.Chicago Tribune


4. A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca

Author: by Andrés Reséndez
Basic Books
English
336 pages

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In 1528, a mission set out from Spain to colonize Florida. But the expedition went horribly wrong: Delayed by a hurricane, knocked off course by a colossal error of navigation, and ultimately doomed by a disastrous decision to separate the men from their ships, the mission quickly became a desperate journey of survival.

Of the four hundred men who had embarked on the voyage, only four survived-three Spaniards and an African slave. This tiny band endured a horrific march through Florida, a harrowing raft passage across the Louisiana coast, and years of enslavement in the American Southwest.

They journeyed for almost ten years in search of the Pacific Ocean that would guide them home, and they were forever changed by their experience. The men lived with a variety of nomadic Indians and learned several indigenous languages. They saw lands, peoples, plants, and animals that no outsider had ever before seen.

In this enthralling tale of four castaways wandering in an unknown land, AndrResndez brings to life the vast, dynamic world of North America just a few years before European settlers would transform it forever.


5. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa

Author: by Adam Hochschild
0618001905
English
366 pages

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In the 1880s, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium seized for himself the vast and mostly unexplored territory surrounding the Congo River. Carrying out a genocidal plundering of the Congo, he looted its rubber, brutalized its people, and ultimately slashed its population by ten millionall the while shrewdly cultivating his reputation as a great humanitarian.

Heroic efforts to expose these crimes eventually led to the first great human rights movement of the twentieth century, in which everyone from Mark Twain to the Archbishop of Canterbury participated. King Leopold’s Ghost is the haunting account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions, a man as cunning, charming, and cruel as any of the great Shakespearean villains.

It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who fought Leopold: a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure and unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust. Adam Hochschild brings this largely untold story alive with the wit and skill of a Barbara Tuchman.


6. American Colonies: The Settling of North America, Vol. 1

Author: by Alan Taylor
Penguin Books

‎ English
544 pages

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A multicultural, multinational history of colonial America from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Internal Enemy and American RevolutionsIn the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner, Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to the Pacific coast.

Transcending the usual Anglocentric version of our colonial past, he recovers the importance of Native American tribes, African slaves, and the rival empires of France, Spain, the Netherlands, and even Russia in the colonization of North America. Moving beyond the Atlantic seaboard to examine the entire continent, American Colonies reveals a pivotal period in the global interaction of peoples, cultures, plants, animals, and microbes.

In a vivid narrative, Taylor draws upon cutting-edge scholarship to create a timely picture of the colonial world characterized by an interplay of freedom and slavery, opportunity and loss.”Formidable … Provokes us to contemplate the ways in which residents of North America have dealt with diversity.” -The New York Times Book Review


7. Black Reconstruction in America, 1860-1880

Author: by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois
Free Press
English
768 pages

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The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time. This pioneering work was the first full-length study of the role black Americans played in the crucial period after the Civil War, when the slaves had been freed and the attempt was made to reconstruct American society.

Hailed at the time, Black Reconstruction in America 18601880 has justly been called a classic.


8. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History, 20th Anniversary Edition

Author: by Michel-Rolph Trouillot
Beacon Press
English
216 pages

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Now part of the HBO docuseries “Exterminate All the Brutes,” written and directed by Raoul PeckThe 20th anniversary edition of a pioneering classic that explores the contexts in which history is producednow with a new foreword by renowned scholar Hazel Carby Placing the West’s failure to acknowledge the Haitian Revolutionthe most successful slave revolt in historyalongside denials of the Holocaust and the debate over the Alamo, Michel-Rolph Trouillot offers a stunning meditation on how power operates in the making and recording of history.

This modern classic resides at the intersection of history, anthropology, Caribbean, African-American, and post-colonial studies, and has become a staple in college classrooms around the country. In a new foreword, Hazel Carby explains the book’s enduring importance to these fields of study and introduces a new generation of readers to Trouillot’s brilliant analysis of power and history’s silences.


9. The Willie Lynch Letter and the Making of a Slave

Author: by Willie Lynch
English
38 pages
1495300552

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“The Willie Lynch Letter” written by Willie Lynch is widely considered to be one of the top 100 most controversial books of all time. For many, “The Willie Lynch Letter” is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others “The Willie Lynch Letter” is simply a highly controversial book that they must have as a reference tool and for self enlightenment.

This beautifully produced volume, which includes both “The Mis-Education of the Negro” and “The Willie Lynch Letter,” should be a part of everyone’s personal library.

10. Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge

Author: by Erica Armstrong Dunbar
37 Ink
English
288 pages

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A startling and eye-opening look into America’s First Family, Never Caught is the powerful story about a daring woman of extraordinary grit (The Philadelphia Inquirer). When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation’s capital.

In setting up his household he brought along nine slaves, including Ona Judge. As the President grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn’t abide: Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state.

Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law. Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire. Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, she was denied freedom.

So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England. Yet freedom would not come without its costs. At just twenty-two-years-old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property.

11. 1493: How Europe's Discovery of the Americas Revolutionized Trade, Ecology and Life on Earth

Author: by Charles C. Mann
B005WJ4LO0
September 15, 2011
English

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Two hundred million years ago the earth consisted of a single vast continent, Pangea, surrounded by a great planetary sea. Continental drift tore apart Pangaea, and for millennia the hemispheres were separate, evolving almost entirely different suites of plants and animals.

Columbus’s arrival in the Americas brought together these long-separate worlds. Many historians believe that this collision of ecosystems and cultures – the Columbian Exchange – was the most consequential event in human history since the Neolithic Revolution. And it was the most consequential event in biological history since the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Beginning with the world of microbes and moving up the species ladder to mankind, Mann rivetingly describes the profound effect this exchanging of species had on the culture of both continents.

12. American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt

Author: by Daniel Rasmussen
B004G60B6C
HarperCollins e-books
January 4, 2011

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A gripping and deeply revealing history of an infamous slave rebellion that nearly toppled New Orleans and changed the course of American historyIn January 1811, five hundred slaves, dressed in military uniforms and armed with guns, cane knives, and axes, rose up from the plantations around New Orleans and set out to conquer the city.

Ethnically diverse, politically astute, and highly organized, this self-made army challenged not only the economic system of plantation agriculture but also American expansion. Their march represented the largest act of armed resistance against slavery in the history of the United States.

American Uprising is the riveting and long-neglected story of this elaborate plot, the rebel army’s dramatic march on the city, and its shocking conclusion. No North American slave uprisingnot Gabriel Prosser’s, not Denmark Vesey’s, not Nat Turner’shas rivaled the scale of this rebellion either in terms of the number of the slaves involved or the number who were killed.

13. Undeniable: Full Color Evidence of Black Israelites In The Bible

Author: by Dante Fortson
English
91 pages
1692492780

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Then they fasted that day, and put on sackcloth, and cast ashes upon their heads, and rent their clothes, and laid open the book of the law, wherein the heathen had sought to paint the likeness of their images. 1 Maccabees 3:47-48Undeniable is the perfect outreach tool to connect with anyone that is skeptical of the claim that the Israelites of the Bible are were black, and have always been black.

This is first and foremost an outreach tool, but it also makes a great gift for anyone that wants to see the hard evidence. + Full Color Images+ Minimal Commentary+ Designed To Start The ConversationInside of the book you’ll find:+ Maps+ Paintings+ Statues+ Explorer Journal Entries+ Memorandum To The President of The United StatesAll of the evidence adds up to the fact that there was a multi national conspiracy to kidnap, enslave, and hide the true history of Negroes scattered all over the world through the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

There has been a conscious concerted effort to steer people away from the truth that Israel fled into Africa in 70 A.D. And still inhabits many areas of the continent.

14. Reconstruction Updated Edition: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877 (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

Author: by Eric Foner
English
752 pages
0062354515

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From the “preeminent historian of Reconstruction” (New York Times Book Review), the prize-winning classic work on the post-Civil War period that shaped modern America. Eric Foner’s “masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history” (New Republic) redefined how the post-Civil War period was viewed.

Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americansblack and whiteresponded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the ways in which the emancipated slaves’ quest for economic autonomy and equal citizenship shaped the political agenda of Reconstruction; the remodeling of Southern society and the place of planters, merchants, and small farmers within it; the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations; and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans.

This “smart book of enormous strengths” (Boston Globe) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War periodan era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.

15. "Exterminate All the Brutes": One Man's Odyssey into the Heart of Darkness and the Origins of European Genocide

Author: by Sven Lindqvist
English
179 pages
1565843592

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Now part of the eponymous HBO docuseries written and directed by Raoul Peck, Exterminate All the Brutes is a brilliant intellectual history of Europe’s genocidal colonization of Africaand the terrible myths and lies that it spawned A book of stunning range and near genius….

The catastrophic consequences of European imperialism are made palpable in the personal progress of the author, a late-twentieth-century pilgrim in Africa. Lindqvist’s astonishing connections across time and cultures, combined with a marvelous economy of prose, leave the reader appalled, reflective, and grateful.

David Levering Lewis Exterminate All the Brutes, Sven Lindqvist’s widely acclaimed masterpiece, is a searching examination of Europe’s dark history in Africa and the origins of genocide. Using Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness as his point of departure, the award-winning Swedish author takes us on a haunting tour through the colonial past, interwoven with a modern-day travelogue.

Retracing the steps of European explorers, missionaries, politicians, and historians in Africa from the late eighteenth century onward, Exterminate All the Brutes exposes the roots of genocide in Africa through Lindqvist’s own journey through the Saharan desert. As he shows, fantasies not merely of white superiority but of actual exterminationcleansing the earth of the so-called lesser racesdeeply informed the colonialism and racist ideology that ultimately culminated in Europe’s own Holocaust.