Best Sociology of Social Theory Books

Here you will get Best Sociology of Social Theory Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Caste (Oprah's Book Club): The Origins of Our Discontents

Author: by Isabel Wilkerson
Random House
English
496 pages

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLIST An instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far. Dwight Garner, The New York TimesThe Pulitzer Prizewinning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions.

NAMED THE #1 NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BY TIME, ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People The Washington Post Publishers Weekly AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review O: The Oprah Magazine NPR Bloomberg Christian Science Monitor New York Post The New York Public Library Fortune Smithsonian Magazine Marie Claire Town & Country Slate Library Journal Kirkus Reviews LibraryReads PopMattersWinner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Finalist PEN/Jean Stein Book Award LonglistAs we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance.


2. Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment

Author: by Daniel Kahneman
English
464 pages
0316451401

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From the Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and Slow and the coauthor of Nudge, a revolutionary exploration of why people make bad judgments and how to make better ones-“a tour de force (New York Times). Imagine that two doctors in the same city give different diagnoses to identical patientsor that two judges in the same courthouse give markedly different sentences to people who have committed the same crime.

Suppose that different interviewers at the same firm make different decisions about indistinguishable job applicantsor that when a company is handling customer complaints, the resolution depends on who happens to answer the phone. Now imagine that the same doctor, the same judge, the same interviewer, or the same customer service agent makes different decisions depending on whether it is morning or afternoon, or Monday rather than Wednesday.

These are examples of noise: variability in judgments that should be identical. In Noise, Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony, and Cass R. Sunstein show the detrimental effects of noise in many fields, including medicine, law, economic forecasting, forensic science, bail, child protection, strategy, performance reviews, and personnel selection.

3

The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter–And How to Make the Most of Them Now
Author: by Meg Jay
Twelve
English
336 pages

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The Defining Decade has changed the way millions of twentysomethings think about their twentiesand themselves. Revised and reissued for a new generation, let it change how you think about you and yours. Our “thirty-is-the-new-twenty” culture tells us the twentysomething years don’t matter.

Some say they are an extended adolescence. Others call them an emerging adulthood. In The Defining Decade, Meg Jay argues that twentysomethings have been caught in a swirl of hype and misinformation, much of which has trivialized the most transformative time of our lives.

Drawing from more than two decades of work with thousands of clients and students, Jay weaves the latest science of the twentysomething years with behind-closed-doors stories from twentysomethings themselves. The result is a provocative read that provides the tools necessary to take the most of your twenties, and shows us how work, relationships, personality, identity and even the brain can change more during this decade than at any other time in adulthoodif we use the time well.


4. Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know

Author: by Malcolm Gladwell
Little, Brown & Co.
English
400 pages

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Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Outliers, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangersand why they often go wrong. A Best Book of the Year: The Financial Times, Bloomberg, Chicago Tribune, and Detroit Free Press How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation?

Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to one another that isn’t true? Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news.

He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Blandthrowing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt.


5. The Unbroken Thread: Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos

Author: by Sohrab Ahmari
English
320 pages
0593137175

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We’ve pursued and achieved the modern dream of defining ourselvesbut at what cost? The New York Post op-ed editor makes a compelling case for seeking the inherited traditions and ideals that give our lives meaning. Ahmari’s tour de force makes tradition astonishingly vivid and relevant for the here and now.

Rod Dreher, bestselling author of Live Not by Lies and The Benedict OptionAs a young father and a self-proclaimed radically assimilated immigrant, opinion editor Sohrab Ahmari realized that when it comes to shaping his young son’s moral fiber, today’s America comes up short.

For millennia, the world’s great ethical and religious traditions taught that true happiness lies in pursuing virtue and accepting limits. But now, unbound from these stubborn traditions, we are free to choose whichever way of life we think is most optimalor, more often than not, merely the easiest.

All that remains are the fickle desires that a wealthy, technologically advanced society is equipped to fulfill. The result is a society riven by deep conflict and individual lives that, for all their apparent freedom, are marked by alienation and stark unhappiness.


6. David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants

Author: by Malcolm Gladwell
Back Bay Books
English
352 pages

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Explore the power of the underdog in Malcolm Gladwell’s dazzling examination of success, motivation, and the role of adversity in shaping our lives, from the bestselling author of The Bomber Mafia. Three thousand years ago on a battlefield in ancient Palestine, a shepherd boy felled a mighty warrior with nothing more than a stone and a sling, and ever since then the names of David and Goliath have stood for battles between underdogs and giants.

David’s victory was improbable and miraculous. He shouldn’t have won.Or should he have? In David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwellchallenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks.

Gladwell begins with the real story of what happened between the giant and the shepherd boy those many years ago. From there, David and Goliath examines Northern Ireland’s Troubles, the minds of cancer researchers and civil rights leaders, murder and the high costs of revenge, and the dynamics of successful and unsuccessful classroomsall to demonstrate how much of what is beautiful and important in the world arises from what looks like suffering and adversity.


7. The Vision of the Anointed: Self-Congratulation as a Basis for Social Policy

Author: by Thomas Sowell
English
320 pages
046508995X

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Thomas Sowell’s provocative critique of liberalism’s failures The Vision of the Anointed is a devastating critique of the mind-set behind the failed social policies of the past thirty years. Thomas Sowell sees what has happened not as a series of isolated mistakes but as a logical consequence of a vision whose defects have led to disasters in education, crime, family disintegration, and other social pathology.

In this book, “politically correct” theory is repeatedly confronted with facts – and sharp contradictions between the two are explained in terms of a whole set of self-congratulatory assumptions held by political and intellectual elites. These elites – the anointed – often consider themselves “thinking people,” but much of what they call thinking turns out, on examination, to be rhetorical assertion, followed by evasions of mounting evidence against those assertions.


8. Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

Author: by Richard H. Thaler
014311526X
Penguin Books
English

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Coming soon: Nudge: The Final EditionFrom the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, Richard H.Thaler, and Cass R. Sunstein: a revelatory look at how we make decisionsfor fans of Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink, Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit, James Clear’s Atomic Habits, and Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow* More than 1.

5 million copies sold* New York Times bestseller * Named a Best Book of the Year by The Economist and the Financial TimesEvery day we make choicesabout what to buy or eat, about financial investments or our children’s health and education, even about the causes we champion or the planet itself.

Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. Nudge is about how we make these choices and how we can make better ones. Using dozens of eye-opening examples and drawing on decades of behavioral science research, Nobel Prize winner Richard H. Thaler and Harvard Law School professor Cass R.

Sunstein show that no choice is ever presented to us in a neutral way, and that we are all susceptible to biases that can lead us to make bad decisions. But by knowing how people think, we can use sensible choice architecture to nudge people toward the best decisions for ourselves, our families, and our society, without restricting our freedom of choice.


9. Time to Eat: Delicious Meals for Busy Lives: A Cookbook

Author: by Nadiya Hussain
Clarkson Potter
English
256 pages

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From the host of the beloved Netflix series Time to Eat and winner of The Great British Baking Show come over 100 time-smart recipes to tackle family mealtime. Nadiya Hussain knows that feeding a family and juggling a full work load can be challenging.

Time to Eat solves mealtime on weeknights and busy days with quick and easy recipes that the whole family will love. Nadiya shares all her tips and tricks for making meal prep as simple as possible, including ideas for repurposing leftovers and components of dishes into new recipes, creating second meals to keep in the freezer, and using shortcuts-like frozen foods-to cut your prep time significantly.

In Time to Eat, Nadiya teaches you to make recipes from her hit Netflix show, including Peanut Butter & Jelly Traybake, Instant Noodles, Egg Rolls, and zesty Marmalade Haddock. Each recipe also notes exactly how long it will take to prepare and cook, making planning easy.

Helpful icons identify which recipes can be made ahead, which ones are freezer-friendly, and which ones can be easily doubled.

10. Humankind: A Hopeful History

Author: by Rutger Bregman
Little, Brown and Company
English
480 pages

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From New York Times bestselling author of Utopia for Realists comes a “bold” (Daniel H. Pink) and “extraordinary” (Susan Cain) argument that humans thrive in a crisis and that our innate kindness and cooperation have been the greatest factors in our long-term success on the planet.

If there is one belief that has united the left and the right, psychologists and philosophers, ancient thinkers and modern ones, it is the tacit assumption that humans are bad. It’s a notion that drives newspaper headlines and guides the laws that shape our lives.

From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Pinker, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we’re taught, are by nature selfish and governed primarily by self-interest. But what if it isn’t true? International bestseller Rutger Bregman provides new perspective on the past 200,000 years of human history, setting out to prove that we are hardwired for kindness, geared toward cooperation rather than competition, and more inclined to trust rather than distrust one another.

11. The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life

Author: by David Brooks
English
384 pages
0812983424

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Everybody tells you to live for a cause larger than yourself, but how exactly do you do it? The author of The Road to Character explores what it takes to lead a meaningful life in a self-centered world.

Deeply moving, frequently eloquent and extraordinarily incisive. The Washington Post Every so often, you meet people who radiate joywho seem to know why they were put on this earth, who glow with a kind of inner light. Life, for these people, has often followed what we might think of as a two-mountain shape.

They get out of school, they start a career, and they begin climbing the mountain they thought they were meant to climb. Their goals on this first mountain are the ones our culture endorses: to be a success, to make your mark, to experience personal happiness.

But when they get to the top of that mountain, something happens. They look around and find the view …Unsatisfying. They realize: This wasn’t my mountain after all. There’s another, bigger mountain out there that is actually my mountain. And so they embark on a new journey.

12. Into the Abyss: An Extraordinary True Story

Author: by Carol Shaben
B009CJK4GA
May 21, 2013
English

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Read the “gripping and emotionally affecting” book where four men survived the plane crash.The pilot.A politician.A cop… And the criminal he was shackled to (Washington Post). On an icy night in October 1984, a commuter plane carrying nine passengers crashed in the remote wilderness of northern Alberta, killing six people.

Four survived: the rookie pilot, a prominent politician, a cop, and the criminal he was escorting to face charges. Despite the poor weather, Erik Vogel, the 24-year-old pilot, was under intense pressure to fly. Larry Shaben, the author’s father and Canada’s first Muslim Cabinet Minister, was commuting home after a busy week at the Alberta Legislature.

Constable Scott Deschamps was escorting Paul Archambault, a drifter wanted on an outstanding warrant. Against regulations, Archambault’s handcuffs were removed-a decision that would profoundly impact the men’s survival. As the men fight through the night to stay alive, the dividing lines of power, wealth, and status are erased, and each man is forced to confront the precious and limited nature of his existence.

13. Human Diversity: The Biology of Gender, Race, and Class

Author: by Charles Murray
Twelve
English
528 pages

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All people are equal but, as Human Diversity explores, all groups of people are not the same – a fascinating investigation of the genetics and neuroscience of human differences. The thesis of Human Diversity is that advances in genetics and neuroscience are overthrowing an intellectual orthodoxy that has ruled the social sciences for decades.

The core of the orthodoxy consists of three dogmas: Gender is a social construct. Race is a social construct. Class is a function of privilege. The problem is that all three dogmas are half-truths. They have stifled progress in understanding the rich texture that biology adds to our understanding of the social, political, and economic worlds we live in.

It is not a story to be feared. “There are no monsters in the closet,” Murray writes, “no dread doors we must fear opening.” But it is a story that needs telling. Human Diversity does so without sensationalism, drawing on the most authoritative scientific findings, celebrating both our many differences and our common humanity.

14. Technological Slavery

Author: by Theodore Kaczynski
English
355 pages
1944228012

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The bestselling untextbook gets students thinking like sociologists Dalton Conley’s unconventional narrative uses personal anecdotes and current examples to help students understand big ideas. Chapter opening Paradoxes stimulate sociological thinking. And NEW Practice activitiesin text and onlineinvite readers to make the familiar strange.

Scholarship and examples have been refreshed throughout, especially in a revamped Gender chapter. A wide array of multimedia and assessment tools include award winning InQuizitive activities for students’ pre lecture prep and NEW online activities for post lecture practice.