Best Central Africa History Books

Here you will get Best Central Africa History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa

Author: by Adam Hochschild
B004KZOWEG
Mariner Books
September 3, 1999

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“An enthralling story … A work of history that reads like a novel.” Christian Science Monitor As Hochschild’s brilliant book demonstrates, the great Congo scandal prefigured our own times … This book must be read and reread. Los Angeles Times Book Review In the late nineteenth century, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium carried out a brutal plundering of the territory surrounding the Congo River.

Ultimately slashing the area’s population by ten million, he still managed to shrewdly cultivate his reputation as a great humanitarian. A tale far richer than any novelist could invent, King Leopold’s Ghost is the horrifying account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions.

It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who defied Leopold: African rebel leaders who fought against hopeless odds and a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure but unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust and participants in the twentieth century’s first great human rights movement.


2. Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War

Author: by Mark Bowden
Grove Press
English
400 pages

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Already a classic of war reporting and now reissued as a Grove Press paperback, Black Hawk Down is Mark Bowden’s brilliant account of the longest sustained firefight involving American troops since the Vietnam War. On October 3, 1993, about a hundred elite U.S.

Soldiers were dropped by helicopter into the teeming market in the heart of Mogadishu, Somalia. Their mission was to abduct two top lieutenants of a Somali warlord and return to base. It was supposed to take an hour. Instead, they found themselves pinned down through a long and terrible night fighting against thousands of heavily-armed Somalis.

The following morning, eighteen Americans were dead and more than seventy had been badly wounded. Drawing on interviews from both sides, army records, audiotapes, and videos (some of the material is still classified), Bowden’s minute-by-minute narrative is one of the most exciting accounts of modern combat ever writtena riveting story that captures the heroism, courage, and brutality of battle.


3. Loot: Britain and the Benin Bronzes

Author: by Barnaby Phillips
English
400 pages
1786079356

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A fascinating and timely book.’ William Boyd Grippinga must read.’ FT Compellinghumane, reasonable, and ultimately optimistic.’ Evening Standard [A] valuable guide to a complex narrative.’ The Times In 1897, Britain sent a punitive expedition to the Kingdom of Benin, in what is today Nigeria, in retaliation for the killing of seven British officials and traders.

British soldiers and sailors captured Benin, exiled its king and annexed the territory. They also made off with some of Africa’s greatest works of art. This is the story of the Benin Bronzes’: their history before the British took them, their fate since 1897, and the intense debate about their future.

When they were first displayed in London their splendour and antiquity challenged the prevailing view of Africa as a continent without culture or history. They are now amongst the most admired and valuable artworks in the world. But seeing the Benin Bronzes in the British Museum today is, in the words of one Benin City artist, like visiting relatives behind bars’. In a time of huge controversy about the legacy of empire, racial justice and the future of museums, what does the future hold for the Bronzes?


4. Black God: An Introduction to the World's Religions and Their Black Gods

Author: by Dr. Supreme Understanding
English
202 pages
1935721127

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Have you ever heard that Christ was Black? What about the Buddha?They weren’t alone. Many of the world’s first deities and divinities, both male and female, were originally depicted as Black. That means dark skin, woolly hair, broad nose, and the kind of personality that made the world pay attention.

In this book, historian Supreme Understanding explores the many Black gods of the ancient world, from Africa to the Near East, to Europe, to India, to China, to Japan, to Australia, all the way to the Black Gods of the Americas.Who were they?

How did they come to be worshipped? And what does this mean for us today? Find out in Black God, by Supreme Understanding.


5. We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda

Author: by Philip Gourevitch
0312243359
Picador
English

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We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction. An unforgettable firsthand account of a people’s response to genocide and what it tells us about humanity.

This remarkable debut book from Philip Gourevitch chronicles what has happened in Rwanda and neighboring states since 1994, when the Rwandan government called on everyone in the Hutu majority to murder everyone in the Tutsi minority. Though the killing was low-tech-largely by machete-it was carried out at shocking speed: some 800,000 people were exterminated in a hundred days.

A Tutsi pastor, in a letter to his church president, a Hutu, used the chilling phrase that gives Gourevitch his title. With keen dramatic intensity, Gourevitch frames the genesis and horror of Rwanda’s “genocidal logic” in the anguish of its aftermath: the mass displacements, the temptations of revenge and the quest for justice, the impossibly crowded prisons and refugee camps.


6. Do Not Disturb: The Story of a Political Murder and an African Regime Gone Bad

Author: by Michela Wrong
PublicAffairs
English
512 pages

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A powerful investigation into a grisly political murder and the authoritarian regime behind it: Do Not Disturb upends the narrative that Rwanda sold the world after one of the deadliest genocides of the twentieth century. We think we know the story of Africa’s Great Lakes region.

Following the Rwandan genocide, an idealistic group of young rebels overthrew the brutal regime in Kigali, ushering in an era of peace and stability that made Rwanda the donor darling of the West, winning comparisons with Switzerland and Singapore. But the truth was considerably more sinister.

Vividly sourcing her story with direct testimony from key participants, Wrong uses the story of the murder of Patrick Karegeya, once Rwanda’s head of external intelligence and a quicksilver operator of supple charm, to paint the portrait of a modern African dictatorship created in the chilling likeness of Paul Kagame, the president who sanctioned his former friend’s assassination.


7. Precolonial Black Africa

Author: by Cheikh Anta Diop
Lawrence Hill Books
English
240 pages

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This comparison of the political and social systems of Europe and black Africa from antiquity to the formation of modern states demonstrates the black contribution to the development of Western civilization.


8. Introduction to African Civilizations

Author: by John G. Jackson
Citadel
English
384 pages

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Timely, relevant, and illuminating, this essential book by respected cultural historian, teacher, and author John G. Jackson sheds long overdue light on standard Eurocentric and distorting approaches to the history of Africa from early African civilizations to Africa’s significance in world history.

With brilliantly objective scholarship, respected historian and author John G. Jackson reexamines the outdated, racist, and Westernized history of Africa that is still taught in schools, and presents one infinitely more rich, colorful, variedand truthful. Challenging the standard dehumanizing and exploitive approaches to African history, from the dawn of prehistory to the resurgent Africa of today-including the portrayal of Africans as savages who ultimately benefitted from European enslavement with its blessings of Christian civilizationJackson confronts the parochial historian, devastates the theoretical pretensions of white supremacists, and expands intellectual horizons.

Accessible and informed, fascinating and candid, Introduction to African Civilizations is an important historical guide that will enhance antiracist teachings for the general reader and the scholar alike. Introduction by John Henrik Clarke, pioneer of African Studies and author of Christopher Columbus and the African Holocaust Foreword by Runoko Rashidi, historian, activist, and author of Introduction to the Study of African Classical Civilizations


9. Machete Season

Author: by Jean Hatzfeld
Picador
English
272 pages

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During the spring of 1994, in a tiny country called Rwanda, some 800,000 people were hacked to death, one by one, by their neighbors in a gruesome civil war. Several years later, journalist Jean Hatzfeld traveled to Rwanda to interview ten participants in the killings, eliciting extraordinary testimony from these men about the genocide they perpetrated.

As Susan Sontag wrote in the preface, Machete Season is a document that “everyone should read … [because making] the effort to understand what happened in Rwanda … Is part of being a moral adult.”

10. Dancing in the Glory of Monsters: The Collapse of the Congo and the Great War of Africa

Author: by Jason Stearns
PublicAffairs
English
416 pages

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The definitive story of African nations after they emerged from colonialism – from Mugabe’s doomed kleptocracy to Mandela’s inspiring defeat of apartheid. The Fate of Africa has been hailed by reviewers as “A masterpiece…. The nonfiction book of the year” (The New York Post); “a magnificent achievement” (Weekly Standard); “a joy,” (Wall Street Journal) and “one of the decade’s most important works on Africa” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

Spanning the full breadth of the continent, from the bloody revolt in Algiers against the French to Zimbabwe’s civil war, Martin Meredith’s classic history focuses on the key personalities, events and themes of the independence era, and explains the myriad problems that Africa has faced in the past half-century.

It covers recent events like the ongoing conflict in Sudan, the controversy over Western aid, the exploitation of Africa’s resources, and the growing importance and influence of China.

12. Blood River: The Terrifying Journey through the World's Most Dangerous Country

Author: by Tim Butcher
B0097D6XNO
Grove Press
September 15, 2009

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A British journalist retraces the legendary 1874 expedition of H.M. Stanley in this remarkable marriage of travelogue and history (Max Hastings, author of Armageddon). When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000,. He quickly became obsessed with the Congo River and the idea of recreating H.M.

Stanley’s nineteenth-century journey along the nearly three-thousand-mile waterway. Despite repeated warnings that his plan was suicidal, Butcher set out for the Congo’s eastern border with just a backpack and a few thousand dollars hidden in his boots. Making his way in an assortment of vehicles, including a motorbike and a dugout canoe, helped along by a cast of characters from UN aid workers to a pygmy rights advocate, he follows in the footsteps of the great Victorian adventurer.

Butcher’s forty-four-day journey along the Congo River is an unforgettable story of exploration, survival, and history come to life.Quite superb …A masterpiece. John le Carr, #1 New York Timesbestselling author Do NOT try to repeat Tim Butcher’s audacious and terrifying Congo journey.

13. Congo: The Epic History of a People

Author: by David Van Reybrouck

0062200127
Ecco
English

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From the beginnings of the slave trade through colonization, the struggle for independence, Mobutu’s brutal three decades of rule, and the civil war that has raged from 1996 to the present day, Congo: The Epic History of a People traces the history of one of the most devastated nations in the world.

Esteemed scholar David Van Reybrouck balances hundreds of interviews with a diverse range of Congolese with meticulous historical research to construct a multidimensional portrait of a nation and its people. Epic in scope yet eminently readable, both penetrating and deeply moving, Congoa finalist for the Cundill Prizetakes a deeply humane approach to political history, focusing squarely on the Congolese perspective, and returns a nation’s history to its people.

14. A Thousand Hills: Rwanda's Rebirth and the Man Who Dreamed It

Author: by Stephen Kinzer
Wiley
English
410 pages

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A Thousand Hills: Rwanda’s Rebirth and the Man Who Dreamed It is the story of Paul Kagame, a refugee who, after a generation of exile, found his way home. Learn about President Kagame, who strives to make Rwanda the first middle-income country in Africa, in a single generation.

In this adventurous tale, learn about Kagame’s early fascination with Che Guevara and James Bond, his years as an intelligence agent, his training in Cuba and the United States, the way he built his secret rebel army, his bloody rebellion, and his outsized ambitions for Rwanda.

15. Born Free: A Lioness of Two Worlds

Author: by Joy Adamson
Pantheon
English
224 pages

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There have been many accounts of the return to the wild of tame animals, but since its original publication in 1960, when The New York Times hailed it as a fascinating and remarkable book, Born Free has stood alone in its power to move us.

Joy Adamson’s story of a lion cub in transition between the captivity in which she is raised and the fearsome wild to which she is returned captures the abilities of both humans and animals to cross the seemingly unbridgeable gap between their radically different worlds.

Especially now, at a time when the sanctity of the wild and its inhabitants is increasingly threatened by human development and natural disaster, Adamson’s remarkable tale is an idyll, and a model, to return to again and again. Illustrated with the same beautiful, evocative photographs that first enchanted the world forty years ago and updated with a new introduction by George Page, former host and executive editor of the PBS series Nature and author of Inside the Animal Mind, this anniversary edition introduces to a new generation one of the most heartwarming associations between man and animal.

16. Patrice Lumumba: The Life and Legacy of the Pan-African Politician Who Became Congo’s First Prime Minister

Author: by Charles River Editors
English
53 pages
1689790644

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Includes pictures*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Without dignity there is no liberty, without justice there is no dignity, and without independence there are no free men. Patrice LumumbaThe modern history of Africa was, until very recently, written on behalf of the indigenous races by the white man, who had forcefully entered the continent during a particularly hubristic and dynamic phase of European history.

In 1884, Prince Otto von Bismarck, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together, to deal with Africa’s colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This eventknown as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa.

The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty.