Best Children's Native American Books

Here you will get Best Children's Native American Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. We Are Water Protectors

Author: by Carole Lindstrom
Roaring Brook Press
English
40 pages

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Winner of the 2021 Caldecott Medal#1 New York Times BestsellerInspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm and corruptiona bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade.

Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all … When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth And poison her people’s water, one young water protectorTakes a stand to defend Earth’s most sacred resource.


2. Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story

Author: by Kevin Noble Maillard
Roaring Brook Press
English
48 pages

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Winner of the 2020 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book MedalA 2020 American Indian Youth Literature Picture Book Honor WinnerA wonderful and sweet book …Lovely stuff. The New York Times Book Review Told in lively and powerful verse by debut author Kevin Noble Maillard, Fry Bread is an evocative depiction of a modern Native American family, vibrantly illustrated by Pura Belpre Award winner and Caldecott Honoree Juana Martinez-Neal.Fry bread is food.

It is warm and delicious, piled high on a plate.Fry bread is time. It brings families together for meals and new memories. Fry bread is nation. It is shared by many, from coast to coast and beyond.Fry bread is us.

It is a celebration of old and new, traditional and modern, similarity and difference. A 2020 Charlotte Huck Recommended BookA Publishers Weekly Best Picture Book of 2019A Kirkus Reviews Best Picture Book of 2019A School Library Journal Best Picture Book of 2019A Booklist 2019 Editor’s ChoiceA Shelf Awareness Best Children's Book of 2019A Goodreads Choice Award 2019 SemifinalistA Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Book of 2019A National Public Radio (NPR) Best Book of 2019An NCTE Notable Poetry BookA 2020 NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young PeopleA 2020 ALA Notable Children's BookA 2020 ILA Notable Book for a Global Society 2020 Bank Street College of Education Best Children's Books of the Year ListOne of NPR’s 100 Favorite Books for Young ReadersNominee, Pennsylvania Young Readers Choice Award 2022-2022Nominee, Illinois Monarch Award 2022


3. The Sign of the Beaver

Author: by Elizabeth George Speare
0547577117
English
135 pages

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In this Newbery Honor book, a thirteen-year-old boy struggles to survive on his own in the wilderness of eighteenth-century Maine. When Matt’s father leaves him on his own to guard their new cabin in the wilderness, Matt is scared but determined to be brave and prove that he can take care of himself.

And things are going fine until a white stranger steals his gun, leaving Matt defenseless and unable to hunt for his food. Then Matt meets Attean, a Native boy from the Beaver tribe, and soon learns that people called the land around him home long before the white settlers ever arrived.

As Attean teaches him more about his own culture, Matt must come to terms with what the changing frontier really means. Now with an introduction by critically acclaimed writer Joseph Bruchac about the historical context and the relationships between Native peoples and white settlers in the eighteenth century.


4. Code Talker: A Novel About the Navajo Marines of World War Two

Author: by Joseph Bruchac
Speak

English
231 pages

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“Readers who choose the book for the attraction of Navajo code talking and the heat of battle will come away with more than they ever expected to find.”Booklist, starred review Throughout World War II, in the conflict fought against Japan, Navajo code talkers were a crucial part of the U.S.

Effort, sending messages back and forth in an unbreakable code that used their native language. They braved some of the heaviest fighting of the war, and with their code, they saved countless American lives. Yet their story remained classified for more than twenty years.

But now Joseph Bruchac brings their stories to life for young adults through the riveting fictional tale of Ned Begay, a sixteen-year-old Navajo boy who becomes a code talker. His grueling journey is eye-opening and inspiring. This deeply affecting novel honors all of those young men, like Ned, who dared to serve, and it honors the culture and language of the Navajo Indians.

An ALA Best Book for Young Adults”Nonsensational and accurate, Bruchac’s tale is quietly inspiring…”School Library Journal


5. An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People (ReVisioning History for Young People)

Author: by Jean Mendoza
Beacon Press
English
272 pages

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2020 American Indian Youth Literature Young Adult Honor Book2020 Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People,selected by National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the Children's Book Council 2019 Best-Of Lists: Best YA Nonfiction of 2019 (Kirkus Reviews) Best Nonfiction of 2019 (School Library Journal) Best Books for Teens (New York Public Library) Best Informational Books for Older Readers (Chicago Public Library)Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples’ resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism.

Going beyond the story of America as a country discovered by a few brave men in the New World, Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity.

The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.


6. Prairie Lotus

Author: by Linda Sue Park
English
272 pages
132878150X

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Prairie Lotus is a powerful, touching, multilayered book about a girl determined to fit in and realize her dreams: getting an education, becoming a dressmaker in her father’s shop, and making at least one friend. Acclaimed, award-winning author Linda Sue Park has placed a young half-Asian girl, Hanna, in a small town in America’s heartland, in 1880.

Hanna’s adjustment to her new surroundings, which primarily means negotiating the townspeople’s almost unanimous prejudice against Asians, is at the heart of the story. Narrated by Hanna, the novel has poignant moments yet sparkles with humor, introducing a captivating heroine whose wry, observant voice will resonate with readers.Afterword.


7. We Are Still Here!: Native American Truths Everyone Should Know

Author: by Traci Sorell
English
40 pages
1623541921

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Twelve Native American kids present historical and contemporary laws, policies, struggles, and victories in Native life, each with a powerful refrain: We are still here! Too often, Native American history is treated as a finished chapter instead of relevant and ongoing.

This companion book to the award-winning We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga offers readers everything they never learned in school about Native American people’s past, present, and future. Precise, lyrical writing presents topics including: forced assimilation (such as boarding schools), land allotment and Native tribal reorganization, termination (the US government not recognizing tribes as nations), Native urban relocation (from reservations), self-determination (tribal self-empowerment), Native civil rights, the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), religious freedom, economic development (including casino development), Native language revival efforts, cultural persistence, and nationhood.


8. Show Me a Sign

Author: by Ann Clare LeZotte
English
288 pages
1338255819

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Don’t miss the companion book, Set Me FreeWinner of the 2021 Schneider Family Book Award NPR Best Books of 2020 Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2020 School Library Journal Best Books of 2020 New York Public Library Best Books of 2020 Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2020 2020 Jane Addams Children's Book Award Finalist 2020 New England Independent Booksellers Award Finalist* “A must-read.” – Kirkus Reviews, starred review”More than just a page-turner.

Well researched and spare…Sensitive… Relevant.” – Newbery Medalist, Meg Medina for the New York Times”A triumph.” – Brian Selznick, creator of Wonderstruck and the Caldecott Award winner, The Invention of Hugo Cabret* “Will enthrall readers, but her internal journey…

Profound.” – The Horn Book, starred review* “Expertly crafted… Exceptionally written.” – School Library Journal, starred review* “Engrossing.” – Publishers Weekly, starred review”This book blew me away.” – Alex Gino, Stonewall Award-winning author of George”Spend time in Mary’s world.


9. Who Was Sacagawea?

Author: by Judith Bloom Fradin
English
112 pages
0448424851

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Sacagawea was only sixteen when she made one of the most remarkable journeys in American history, traveling 4500 miles by foot, canoe, and horse-all while carrying a baby on her back! Without her, the Lewis and Clark expedition might have failed.

Through this engaging book, kids will understand the reasons that today, 200 years later, she is still remembered and immortalized on a golden dollar coin.

10. Mama Do You Love Me?: (Children's Storytime Book, Arctic and Wild Animal Picture Book, Native American Books for Toddlers) (Mama, MAMA)

Author: by Barbara M. Joosse
Chronicle Books
English
24 pages

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Mama, do you love me?Yes I do, Dear One.How much? In this universal story, a child tests the limits of independence and comfortingly learns that a parent’s love is unconditional and everlasting. The lyrical text introduces young readers to a distinctively different culture, while at the same time showing that the special love that exists between parent and child transcends all boundaries of time and place.

The story is beautifully complemented by graphically stunning illustrations that are filled with such exciting animals as whales, wolves, puffins, and sled dogs. This tender and reassuring book is one that both parents and children will turn to again and again.

Set in a captivating and unusual Arctic setting Includes a carefully researched glossary provides additional information on Arctic lifeFans of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Goodnight Moon, and Guess How Much I Love You will love this book. This book is a great read for: Toddlers and young children Families interested in different cultures Parents Librarians

11. We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga

Author: by Traci Sorell
ISBN: 978-1580897723
Published at: Charlesbridge; Illustrated edition (September 4, 2018)

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2019 Sibert Honor Book2019 Orbis Pictus Honor BookNPR’s Guide To 2018’s Great Reads2018 Book Launch Award (SCBWI)Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2018School Library Journal Best Books of 20182018 JLG selection2019 Reading the West Picture Book AwardThe Cherokee community is grateful for blessings and challenges that each season brings.

This is modern Native American life as told by an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation. The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow a full Cherokee year of celebrations and experiences.

Written by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, this look at one group of Native Americans is appended with a glossary and the complete Cherokee syllabary, originally created by Sequoyah.”A gracious, warm, and loving celebration of community and gratitude”Kirkus Reviews STARRED REVIEW”The book underscores the importance of traditions and carrying on a Cherokee way of life”Horn Book STARRED REVIEW”This informative and authentic introduction to a thriving ancestral and ceremonial way of life is perfect for holiday and family sharing”School Library Journal STARRED REVIEW”An elegant representation”Shelf Awareness STARRED REVIEW

12. I Can Make This Promise

Author: by Christine Day
Heartdrum
English
288 pages

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In her debut middle grade novelinspired by her family’s historyChristine Day tells the story of a girl who uncovers her family’s secretsand finds her own Native American identity. All her life, Edie has known that her mom was adopted by a white couple.

So, no matter how curious she might be about her Native American heritage, Edie is sure her family doesn’t have any answers. Until the day when she and her friends discover a box hidden in the attica box full of letters signed Love, Edith, and photos of a woman who looks just like her.

Suddenly, Edie has a flurry of new questions about this woman who shares her name. Could she belong to the Native family that Edie never knew about? But if her mom and dad have kept this secret from her all her life, how can she trust them to tell her the truth now?

13. What Was the Lewis and Clark Expedition?

Author: by Judith St. George
Penguin Workshop
English
112 pages

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When Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and the “Corp of Discovery” left St. Louis, Missouri, on May 21, 1804, their mission was to explore the vast, unknown territory acquired a year earlier in the Louisiana Purchase. The travelers hoped to find a waterway that crossed the western half of the United States.They didn’t.

However, young readers will love this true-life adventure tale of the two-year journey that finally brought the explorers to the Pacific Ocean.

14. Indian No More

Author: by Charlene Willing Mcmanis
Tu Books
English
211 pages

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Editors’ Choices for Books for Youth, Booklist Best of the Best Books of 2019, Chicago Public Library Starred review, School Library Journal Starred review, Booklist Best Books of 2019, American Indians in Children's Literature Regina Petit’s family has always been Umpqua, and living on the Grand Ronde reservation is all ten-year-old Regina has ever known.

Her biggest worry is that Sasquatch may actually exist out in the forest. But when the federal government signs a bill into law that says Regina’s tribe no longer exists, Regina becomes “Indian no more” overnight-even though she was given a number by the Bureau of Indian Affairs that counted her as Indian, even though she lives with her tribe and practices tribal customs, and even though her ancestors were Indian for countless generations.

With no good jobs available in Oregon, Regina’s father signs the family up for the Indian Relocation program and moves them to Los Angeles. Regina finds a whole new world in her neighborhood on 58th Place. She’s never met kids of other races, and they’ve never met a real Indian.

15. I Sang You Down from the Stars

Author: by Tasha Spillett-Sumner
English
32 pages
0316493163

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A New York Times bestseller! This unique baby book sings with Native cultural detail, while striking a universal chord in its celebration of the blossoming of love that comes with expecting and welcoming a new baby-with art by New York Times bestselling illustrator and Caldecott Medalist Michaela Goade As she waits for the arrival of her new baby, a mother-to-be gathers gifts to create a sacred bundle.

A white feather, cedar and sage, a stone from the river … Each addition to the bundle will offer the new baby strength and connection to tradition, family, and community. As they grow together, mother and baby will each have gifts to offer each other.

Tasha Spillett-Sumner and Michaela Goade, two Indigenous creators, bring beautiful words and luminous art together in a resonant celebration of the bond between mother and child.

16. National Geographic Kids Encyclopedia of American Indian History and Culture: Stories, Timelines, Maps, and More

Author: by Cynthia O'Brien
National Geographic Kids
English
304 pages

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American Indian customs, stories, and history come to life in this important and authoritative reference, artfully designed and packaged for kids and students. More than 160 tribes are featured in this outstanding new encyclopedia, which presents a comprehensive overview of the history of North America’s Native peoples.

From the Apache to the Zuni, readers will learn about each tribe’s history, traditions, and culture, including the impact of European expansion across the land and how tribes live today. Features include maps of ancestral lands; timelines of important dates and events; fact boxes for each tribe; bios of influential American Indians such as Sitting Bull; sidebars on daily life, homes, food, clothing, jewelry, and games; Did You Know facts with photographs; and traditional Native stories.

The design is compelling and colorful, packed with full-color photographs. To help give kids the lay of the land, this reference is arranged by region, and all federally recognized tribes are included. With nothing comparable available, it is sure to be a valuable resource for kids, students, librarians, and families.