Best Educator Biographies Books

Here you will get Best Educator Biographies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books for you.

1. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson, 20th Anniversary Edition

Author: by Mitch Albom
076790592X
Crown
English

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A special 20th anniversary edition of the beloved international bestseller that changed millions of livesMaybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder. Wouldn’t you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?

Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man’s life. Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final class: lessons in how to live.


2. The Appalachian Trail: A Biography

Author: by Philip D'Anieri
English
272 pages
0358171997

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The Appalachian Trail is America’s most beloved trek, with millions of hikers setting foot on it every year. Yet few are aware of the fascinating backstory of the dreamers and builders who helped bring it to life over the past century.

The conception and building of the Appalachian Trail is a story of unforgettable characters who explored it, defined it, and captured national attention by hiking it. From Grandma Gatewooda mother of eleven who thru-hiked in canvas sneakers and a drawstring duffleto Bill Bryson, author of the best-selling A Walk in the Woods, the AT has seized the American imagination like no other hiking path.

The 2,000-mile-long hike from Georgia to Maine is not just a trail through the woods, but a set of ideas about nature etched in the forest floor. This character-driven biography of the trail is a must-read not just for ambitious hikers, but for anyone who wonders about our relationship with the great outdoors and dreams of getting away from urban life for a pilgrimage in the wild.


3. The Burning Blue: The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA's Challenger Disaster

Author: by Kevin Cook
English
288 pages
1250755557

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The untold story of a national traumaNASA’s Challenger explosionand what really happened to America’s Teacher in Space, illuminating the tragic cost of humanity setting its sight on the starsYou’ve seen the pictures. You know what happened.Or do you? On January 28, 1986, NASA’s space shuttle Challenger exploded after blasting off from Cape Canaveral.

Christa McAuliffe, America’s Teacher in Space, was instantly killed, along with the other six members of the mission. At least that’s what most of us remember. Kevin Cook tells us what really happened on that ill-fated, unforgettable day. He traces the pressuresleading from NASA to the White Housethat triggered the fatal order to launch on an ice-cold Florida morning.

Cook takes readers inside the shuttle for the agonizing minutes after the explosion, which the astronauts did indeed survive. He uncovers the errors and corner-cutting that led an overconfident space agency to launch a crew that had no chance to escape.

But this is more than a corrective to a now-dimming memory. Centering on McAuliffe, a charmingly down-to-earth civilian on the cusp of history, The Burning Blue animates a colorful cast of characters: a pair of red-hot flyers at the shuttle’s controls, the second female and first Jewish astronaut, the second Black astronaut, and the first Asian American and Buddhist in space.


4. Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage

Author: by Anne Lamott
Published at: Riverhead Books (March 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-0593189696

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Anne Lamott is my Oprah. Chicago TribuneFrom the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow comes an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives. In Dusk, Night, Dawn, Anne Lamott explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with.

How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad newspiles upfrom climate crises to daily assaults on civilityhow can we cope? Where, she asks, do we start to get our world and joy and hope and our faith in life itself back …

With our sore feet, hearing loss, stiff fingers, poor digestion, stunned minds, broken hearts? We begin, Lamott says, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity. Drawing from her own experiences, Lamott shows us the intimate and human ways we can adopt to move through life’s dark places and toward the light of hope that still burns ahead for all of us.

As she does in Help, Thanks, Wow and her other bestselling books, Lamott explores the thorny issues of life and faith by breaking them down into manageable, human-sized questions for readers to ponder, in the process showing us how we can amplify life’s small moments of joy by staying open to love and connection.


5. Finding Joy in Medicine

Author: by Reza Manesh
English
108 pages
173709830X

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For Dr. Reza Manesh, a life caring for others hasn’t been easy. By learning and cultivating three important principles, he found joy in practicing medicine. Through deeply personal stories, Reza shares how he came to value humanism, humility, and a hunger for growth over the course of his medical career.

He shares moments of finding his purpose, of finding his passion and, ultimately, finding his love of medicine. In this motivational memoir, Reza shares the challenges he faced at each stage of his journey to becoming a clinician. He hopes to help those who, like him, have wondered whether they are good enough to work in health care.

He speaks to anyone struggling to find joy in medicine or contending with emotional or physical exhaustion on their path to becoming a health care professional.


6. The Last Kings of Shanghai: The Rival Jewish Dynasties That Helped Create Modern China

Author: by Jonathan Kaufman
English
384 pages
0735224439

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“In vivid detail…Examines the little-known history of two extraordinary dynasties.”-The Boston Globe”Not just a brilliant, well-researched, and highly readable book about China’s past, it also reveals the contingencies and ironic twists of fate in China’s modern history.”-LA Review of BooksAn epic, multigenerational story of two rival dynasties who flourished in Shanghai and Hong Kong as twentieth-century China surged into the modern era, from the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalistThe Sassoons and the Kadoories stood astride Chinese business and politics for more than one hundred seventy-five years, profiting from the Opium Wars; surviving Japanese occupation; courting Chiang Kai-shek; and nearly losing everything as the Communists swept into power.

Jonathan Kaufman tells the remarkable history of how these families ignited an economic boom and opened China to the world, but remained blind to the country’s deep inequality and to the political turmoil on their doorsteps. In a story stretching from Baghdad to Hong Kong to Shanghai to London, Kaufman enters the lives and minds of these ambitious men and women to forge a tale of opium smuggling, family rivalry, political intrigue, and survival.


7. Miseducated: A Memoir

Author: by Brandon P. Fleming
English
272 pages
0306925133

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An inspiring memoir of one man’s transformation from a delinquent, drug-dealing dropout to an award-winning Harvard educator through literature and debateall by the age of twenty-seven.Brandon P. Fleming grew up in an abusive home and was shuffled through school, his passing grades a nod to his skill on the basketball court, not his presence in the classroom.

He turned to the streets and drug deals by fourteen, saved only by the dream of basketball stardom. When he suffered a career-ending injury during his first semester at a Division I school, he dropped out of college, toiling on an assembly line, until depression drove him to the edge.

Miraculously, his life was spared. Returning to college, Fleming was determined to reinvent himself as a scholarto replace illiteracy with mastery over language, to go from being ignored and unseen to commanding attention. He immersed himself in the work of Black thinkers from the Harlem Renaissance to present day.

Crucially, he found debate, which became the means by which he transformed his life and the tool he would use to transform the lives of othersteaching underserved kids to be intrusive in places that are not inclusive, eventually at Harvard University, where he would make champions and history.


8. Agent Sonya: Moscow's Most Daring Wartime Spy

Author: by Ben Macintyre
Crown
English
400 pages

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The master storyteller (San Francisco Chronicle) behind the New York Times bestseller The Spy and the Traitor uncovers the true story behind the Cold War’s most intrepid female spy. [An] immensely exciting, fast-moving account. The Washington PostNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Foreign Affairs Kirkus Reviews Library JournalIn 1942, in a quiet village in the leafy English Cotswolds, a thin, elegant woman lived in a small cottage with her three children and her husband, who worked as a machinist nearby.

Ursula Burton was friendly but reserved, and spoke English with a slight foreign accent. By all accounts, she seemed to be living a simple, unassuming life. Her neighbors in the village knew little about her. They didn’t know that she was a high-ranking Soviet intelligence officer.

They didn’t know that her husband was also a spy, or that she was running powerful agents across Europe. Behind the facade of her picturesque life, Burton was a dedicated Communist, a Soviet colonel, and a veteran agent, gathering the scientific secrets that would enable the Soviet Union to build the bomb.


9. The Freedom Writers Diary (20th Anniversary Edition): How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used Writing to Change Themselves and the World Around Them

Author: by The Freedom Writers
Crown (October 12, 1999)
English
448 pages

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The twentieth anniversary edition of the classic story of an incredible group of students and the teacher who inspired them, featuring updates on the students’ lives, new journal entries, and an introduction by Erin Gruwell Now a public television documentary, Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart In 1994, an idealistic first-year teacher in Long Beach, California, named Erin Gruwell confronted a room of unteachable, at-risk students.

She had intercepted a note with an ugly racial caricature and angrily declared that this was precisely the sort of thing that led to the Holocaust. She was met by uncomprehending looksnone of her students had heard of one of the defining moments of the twentieth century.

So she rebooted her entire curriculum, using treasured books such as Anne Frank’s diary as her guide to combat intolerance and misunderstanding. Her students began recording their thoughts and feelings in their own diaries, eventually dubbing themselves the Freedom Writers.

10. 438 Days: An Extraordinary True Story of Survival at Sea

Author: by Jonathan Franklin
Atria Books
English
288 pages

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Declared the best survival book in a decade by Outside Magazine, 438 Days is the true story of the man who survived fourteen months in a small boat drifting seven thousand miles across the Pacific Ocean. On November 17, 2012, two men left the coast of Mexico for a weekend fishing trip in the open Pacific.

That night, a violent storm ambushed them as they were fishing eighty miles offshore. As gale force winds and ten-foot waves pummeled their small, open boat from all sides and nearly capsized them, captain Salvador Alvarenga and his crewmate cut away a two-mile-long fishing line and began a desperate dash through crashing waves as they sought the safety of port.

Fourteen months later, on January 30, 2014, Alvarenga, now a hairy, wild-bearded and half-mad castaway, washed ashore on a nearly deserted island on the far side of the Pacific. He could barely speak and was unable to walk. He claimed to have drifted from Mexico, a journey of some seven thousand miles.

A gripping saga, (Daily Mail), 438 Days is the first-ever account of one of the most amazing survival stories in modern times. Based on dozens of hours of exclusive interviews with Alvarenga, his colleagues, search-and-rescue officials, the remote islanders who found him, and the medical team that saved his life, 438 Days is not only an intense, immensely absorbing read (Booklist) but an unforgettable study of the resilience, will, ingenuity and determination required for one man to survive more than a year lost and adrift at sea.

11


Three African-American Classics: Up from Slavery, The Souls of Black Folk and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Author: by W. E. B. Du Bois
Dover Publications
English
448 pages

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This essential collection comprises a trio of the most influential African-American writings of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Exploring such themes as slavery and its abolition, the struggle for equality, and the impassioned rise from bondage to international recognition, each landmark book is a founding work in the civil rights literature of America.

Included here are Booker T. Washington’s Up From Slavery, W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk, and Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. These stirring accounts, significant testaments to our nation’s past together in one volume, belong on the bookshelves of everyone interested in African-American history.

12. The Water Is Wide: A Memoir

Author: by Pat Conroy
Dial Press Trade Paperback
English
320 pages

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A miraculous (Newsweek) human drama, based on a true story, from the renowned author of The Prince of Tides and The Great Santini The island is nearly deserted, haunting, beautiful. Across a slip of ocean lies South Carolina. But for the handful of families on Yamacraw Island, America is a world away.

For years the people here lived proudly from the sea, but now its waters are not safe. Waste from industry threatens their very existence unless, somehow, they can learn a new way. But they will learn nothing without someone to teach them, and their school has no teacheruntil one man gives a year of his life to the island and its people.

Praise for The Water Is Wide Miraculous … An experience of joy. Newsweek A powerfully moving book … You will laugh, you will weep, you will be proud and you will rail … And you will learn to love the man. Charleston News and Courier A hell of a good story.

The New York Times Few novelists write as well, and none as beautifully. Lexington Herald-Leader [Pat] Conroy cuts through his experiences with a sharp edge of irony…. He brings emotion, writing talent and anger to his story.Baltimore Sun

13. A Personal Odyssey

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Free Press
English
320 pages

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This is the gritty story of one man’s lifelong education in the school of hard knocks, as his journey took him from Harlem to the Marines, the Ivy League, and a career as a controversial writer, teacher, and economist in government and private industry.

It is also the story of the dramatically changing times in which this personal odyssey took place.

14. Fortune's Children: The Fall of the House of Vanderbilt

Author: by Arthur T Vanderbilt II
0062224069
William Morrow Paperbacks
English

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Wall Street Journal BestsellerFor fans of Downton Abbey, a real-life American version of the Crawley familyFortune’s Children is an enthralling true story that recreates the drama, splendor, and wealth of the legendary Vanderbilts. Vanderbilt: The very name is synonymous with the Gilded Age.

The family patriarch, “the Commodore, built a fortune that made him the world’s richest man by 1877. Yet, less than fifty years after his death, no Vanderbilt was counted among the world’s richest people. Written by descendant Arthur T. Vanderbilt II, Fortune’s Children traces the dramatic and amazingly colorful history of this great American family, from the rise of industrialist and philanthropist Cornelius Vanderbilt to the fall of his progenywild spendthrifts whose profligacy bankrupted a vast inheritance.

15. Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers: The Texas Victory That Changed American History

Author: by Brian Kilmeade
B07NKP1PTN
English

‎ 40188 KB

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The New York Times bestseller now in paperback with a new epilogue. In March 1836, the Mexican army led by General Santa Anna massacred more than two hundred Texians who had been trapped in the Alamo. After thirteen days of fighting, American legends Jim Bowie and Davey Crockett died there, along with other Americans who had moved to Texas looking for a fresh start.

It was a crushing blow to Texas’s fight for freedom. But the story doesn’t end there. The defeat galvanized the Texian settlers, and under General Sam Houston’s leadership they rallied. Six weeks after the Alamo, Houston and his band of settlers defeated Santa Anna’s army in a shocking victory, winning the independence for which so many had died.

Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers recaptures this pivotal war that changed America forever, and sheds light on the tightrope all war heroes walk between courage and calculation. Thanks to Kilmeade’s storytelling, a new generation of readers will remember the Alamoand recognize the lesser known heroes who snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.

16. Up from Slavery (Dover Thrift Editions)

Author: by Booker T. Washington
Dover Publications
English
176 pages

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Born in a Virginia slave hut, Booker T. Washington (18561915) rose to become the most influential spokesman for African Americans of his day. In this eloquently written book, he describes events in a remarkable life that began in bondage and culminated in worldwide recognition for his many accomplishments.

In simply written yet stirring passages, he tells of his impoverished childhood and youth, the unrelenting struggle for an education, early teaching assignments, his selection in 1881 to head Tuskegee Institute, and more. A firm believer in the value of education as the best route to advancement, Washington disapproved of civil-rights agitation and in so doing earned the opposition of many black intellectuals.

Yet, he is today regarded as a major figure in the struggle for equal rights, one who founded a number of organizations to further the cause and who worked tirelessly to educate and unite African Americans.