Best Ethnic Demographic Studies Books

Here you will get Best Ethnic Demographic Studies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America

Author: by Clint Smith
English
352 pages
0316492930

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Instant #1 New York Times bestseller. “The Atlantic writer drafts a history of slavery in this country unlike anything you’ve read before (Entertainment Weekly). Beginning in his hometown of New Orleans, Clint Smith leads the reader on an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarksthose that are honest about the past and those that are notthat offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping our nation’s collective history, and ourselves.

It is the story of the Monticello Plantation in Virginia, the estate where Thomas Jefferson wrote letters espousing the urgent need for liberty while enslaving more than four hundred people. It is the story of the Whitney Plantation, one of the only former plantations devoted to preserving the experience of the enslaved people whose lives and work sustained it.

It is the story of Angola, a former plantationturnedmaximum-security prison in Louisiana that is filled with Black men who work across the 18,000-acre land for virtually no pay. And it is the story of Blandford Cemetery, the final resting place of tens of thousands of Confederate soldiers.


2. White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Author: by Robin DiAngelo
Beacon Press
English
192 pages

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The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this vital, necessary, and beautiful book (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to bad people’ (Claudia Rankine).

Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue.

In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.


3. Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

Author: by Ibram X. Kendi
One World
English
528 pages

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A chorus of extraordinary voices tells the epic story of the four-hundred-year journey of African Americans from 1619 to the presentedited by Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be an Antiracist, and Keisha N. Blain, author of Set the World on Fire.

A vital addition to [the] curriculum on race in America … A gateway to the solo works of all the voices in Kendi and Blain’s impressive choir. The Washington Post From journalist Hannah P. Jones on Jamestown’s first slaves to historian Annette Gordon-Reed’s portrait of Sally Hemings to the seductive cadences of poets Jericho Brown and Patricia Smith, Four Hundred Souls weaves a tapestry of unspeakable suffering and unexpected transcendence.

O: The Oprah MagazineThe story begins in 1619a year before the Mayflowerwhen the White Lion disgorges some 20-and-odd Negroes onto the shores of Virginia, inaugurating the African presence in what would become the United States. It takes us to the present, when African Americans, descendants of those on the White Lion and a thousand other routes to this country, continue a journey defined by inhuman oppression, visionary struggles, stunning achievements, and millions of ordinary lives passing through extraordinary history.


4. Black Rednecks and White Liberals

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Published at: Encounter Books (April 24, 2006)
ISBN: 978-1594031434

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This explosive new book challenges many of the long-prevailing assumptions about blacks, about Jews, about Germans, about slavery, and about education. Plainly written, powerfully reasoned, and backed with a startling array of documented facts, Black Rednecks and White Liberals takes on not only the trendy intellectuals of our times but also such historic interpreters of American life as Alexis de Tocqueville and Frederick Law Olmsted.

In a series of long essays, this book presents an in-depth look at key beliefs behind many mistaken and dangerous actions, policies, and trends. It presents eye-opening insights into the historical development of the ghetto culture that is today wrongly seen as a unique black identity-a culture cheered on toward self-destruction by white liberals who consider themselves “friends” of blacks.

An essay titled “The Real History of Slavery” presents a jolting re-examination of that tragic institution and the narrow and distorted way it is too often seen today. The reasons for the venomous hatred of Jews, and of other groups like them in countries around the world, are explored in an essay that asks, “Are Jews Generic?” Misconceptions of German history in general, and of the Nazi era in particular, are also re-examined.


5. So You Want to Talk About Race

Author: by Ijeoma Oluo
Seal Press
English
272 pages

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In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard-hitting but user-friendly examination of race in America Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy – from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans – has put a media spotlight on racism in our society.

Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair – and how do you make it right?

How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend? In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.

“Oluo gives us – both white people and people of color – that language to engage in clear, constructive, and confident dialogue with each other about how to deal with racial prejudices and biases.” – National Book Review “Generous and empathetic, yet usefully blunt …


6. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

Author: by J. D. Vance
0062300555
Harper Paperbacks
English

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THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER IS NOW A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD AND STARRING AMY ADAMS, GLENN CLOSE, AND GABRIEL BASSO”You will not read a more important book about America this year.”The Economist “A riveting book.”The Wall Street Journal”Essential reading.”David Brooks, New York TimesHillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisisthat of white working-class Americans.

The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside.J.D.

Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America.J. D.’s grandparents were dirt poor and in love, and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them.


7. This Is the Fire: What I Say to My Friends About Racism

Author: by Don Lemon
English
224 pages
0316257575

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In this vital book for these times’ (Kirkus Reviews), Don Lemon brings his vast audience and experience as a reporter and a Black man to today’s most urgent question: How can we end racism in America in our lifetimes? The host of CNN Tonight with Don Lemon is more popular than ever.

As America’s only Black prime-time anchor, Lemon and his daily monologues on racism and antiracism, on the failures of the Trump administration and of so many of our leaders, and on America’s systemic flaws speak for his millions of fans.

Now, in an urgent, deeply personal, riveting plea, he shows us all how deep our problems lie, and what we can do to begin to fix them. Beginning with a letter to one of his Black nephews, he proceeds with reporting and reflections on his slave ancestors, his upbringing in the shadows of segregation, and his adult confrontations with politicians, activists, and scholars.

In doing so, Lemon offers a searing and poetic ultimatum to America. He visits the slave port where a direct ancestor was shackled and shipped to America. He recalls a slave uprising in Louisiana, just a few miles from his birthplace.


8. Women, Race & Class

Author: by Angela Y. Davis
0394713516
English
288 pages

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A powerful study of the women’s liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.


9. Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope

Author: by Esau McCaulley
English
208 pages
083085486X

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2021 Christian Book Award program – Faith and Culture2020 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Finalist – Religion2021 Outreach Resources of the Year – Christian Living2021 Christianity Today Book Award – Beautiful Orthodoxy2020 The Gospel Coalition Book Award – Popular Theology – Honorable Mention 2020 Emerging Public Intellectual AwardGrowing up in the American South, Esau McCaulley knew firsthand the ongoing struggle between despair and hope that marks the lives of some in the African American context.

A key element in the fight for hope, he discovered, has long been the practice of Bible reading and interpretation that comes out of traditional Black churches. This ecclesial tradition is often disregarded or viewed with suspicion by much of the wider church and academy, but it has something vital to say.

Reading While Black is a personal and scholarly testament to the power and hope of Black biblical interpretation. At a time in which some within the African American community are questioning the place of the Christian faith in the struggle for justice, New Testament scholar McCaulley argues that reading Scripture from the perspective of Black church tradition is invaluable for connecting with a rich faith history and addressing the urgent issues of our times.

10. American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Author: by Colin Woodard
0143122029
Penguin Books
English

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A New Republic Best Book of the Year The Globalist Top Books of the Year Winner of the Maine Literary Award for Non-fiction Particularly relevant in understanding who voted for who in this presidential election year, this is an endlessly fascinating look at American regionalism and the eleven nations that continue to shape North AmericaAccording to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots.

In American Nations he takes readers on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, offering a revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity, and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future.

From the Deep South to the Far West, to Yankeedom to El Norte, Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how each region continues to uphold its distinguishing ideals and identities today, with results that can be seen in the composition of the U.S.

11. From Babylon to Timbuktu: A History of the Ancient Black Races Including the Black Hebrews

Author: by Rudolph R Windsor
0962088110
Windsor Golden Series
English

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This carefully reserched book is a significant addition to this vital foeld of knowledge. It sets forth, in fascinating detail, the history, from earliset recorded times, of the black races of the Middle East and Africa.

13. Assata: An Autobiography

Author: by Assata Shakur
Lawrence Hill Books
English
296 pages

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On May 2, 1973, Black Panther Assata Shakur (aka JoAnne Chesimard) lay in a hospital, close to death, handcuffed to her bed, while local, state, and federal police attempted to question her about the shootout on the New Jersey Turnpike that had claimed the life of a white state trooper.Long a target of J.

Edgar Hoover’s campaign to defame, infiltrate, and criminalize Black nationalist organizations and their leaders, Shakur was incarcerated for four years prior to her conviction on flimsy evidence in 1977 as an accomplice to murder. This intensely personal and political autobiography belies the fearsome image of JoAnne Chesimard long projected by the media and the state.

With wit and candor, Assata Shakur recounts the experiences that led her to a life of activism and portrays the strengths, weaknesses, and eventual demise of Black and White revolutionary groups at the hand of government officials. The result is a signal contribution to the literature about growing up Black in America that has already taken its place alongside The Autobiography of Malcolm X and the works of Maya Angelou.

14. One Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race

Author: by Yaba Blay

English
288 pages
0807073369

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Challenges narrow perceptions of Blackness as both an identity and lived reality to understand the diversity of what it means to be Black in the US and around the worldWhat exactly is Blackness and what does it mean to be Black?

Is Blackness a matter of biology or consciousness? Who determines who is Black and who is not? Who’s Black, who’s not, and who cares? In the United States, a Black person has come to be defined as any person with any known Black ancestry.

Statutorily referred to as the rule of hypodescent, this definition of Blackness is more popularly known as the one-drop rule, meaning that a person with any trace of Black ancestry, however small or (in)visible, cannot be considered White. A method of social order that began almost immediately after the arrival of enslaved Africans in America, by 1910 it was the law in almost all southern states.

At a time when the one-drop rule functioned to protect and preserve White racial purity, Blackness was both a matter of biology and the law. One was either Black or White.Period. Has the social and political landscape changed one hundred years later?

15. Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement

Author: by Angela Y. Davis
Haymarket Books
English
176 pages

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In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world. Reflecting on the importance of black feminism, intersectionality, and prison abolitionism for today’s struggles, Davis discusses the legacies of previous liberation struggles, from the Black Freedom Movement to the South African anti-Apartheid movement.

She highlights connections and analyzes today’s struggles against state terror, from Ferguson to Palestine. Facing a world of outrageous injustice, Davis challenges us to imagine and build the movement for human liberation. And in doing so, she reminds us that “Freedom is a constant struggle.”Angela Y.

Davis is a political activist, scholar, author, and speaker. She is an outspoken advocate for the oppressed and exploited, writing on Black liberation, prison abolition, the intersections of race, gender, and class, and international solidarity with Palestine. She is the author of several books, including Women, Race, and Class and Are Prisons Obsolete?

16. Notes of a Native Son

Author: by James Baldwin
0807006238
Beacon Press
English

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#26 on The Guardian’s list of 100 best nonfiction books of all time, the essays explore what it means to be Black in AmericaIn an age of Black Lives Matter, James Baldwin’s essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and African Americans abroad are as powerful today as when they were first written.

With films like I Am Not Your Negro and the forthcoming If Beale Street Could Talk bringing renewed interest to Baldwin’s life and work, Notes of a Native Son serves as a valuable introduction. Written during the 1940s and early 1950s, when Baldwin was only in his twenties, the essays collected in Notes of a Native Son capture a view of black life and black thought at the dawn of the civil rights movement and as the movement slowly gained strength through the words of one of the most captivating essayists and foremost intellectuals of that era.

Writing as an artist, activist, and social critic, Baldwin probes the complex condition of being black in America. With a keen eye, he examines everything from the significance of the protest novel to the motives and circumstances of the many black expatriates of the time, from his home in The Harlem Ghetto to a sobering Journey to Atlanta.