Best Historical Geography Books

Here you will get Best Historical Geography Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. History of the World Map by Map

Author: by DK
DK
English
440 pages

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Maps don’t just show us where to go, but also where we’ve been. A stunning overview of all human history, side by side with 140 custom maps. Learn how something like the printing press can define a time, or how the Allies in Europe could defeat the Nazis.

There is so much to read about in this remarkable history book, and just as much to look at. Maps are more than the topography of the Earth or the borders of countries. Maps can represent the movement of people and ideas, and they provide a unique way to explain historical themes and explore sweeping periods of time.

This stunning visual reference book starts with the evolution and migration of our oldest ancestors out of Africa. You can then look up maps about the Greece and Persian War, the Mongol Conquests, Medieval Europe’s trade routes, and the rise of the Ottomans.

There are maps about the colonization of North America, the scientific revolution, Napoleon’s advances, and Britain’s control of India. There’s more in later centuries, like the Age of Imperialism, the American Civil War, industrialized Europe, and the transformation of Japan.


2. The Appalachian Trail: A Biography

Author: by Philip D'Anieri
English
272 pages
0358171997

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The Appalachian Trail is America’s most beloved trek, with millions of hikers setting foot on it every year. Yet few are aware of the fascinating backstory of the dreamers and builders who helped bring it to life over the past century.

The conception and building of the Appalachian Trail is a story of unforgettable characters who explored it, defined it, and captured national attention by hiking it. From Grandma Gatewooda mother of eleven who thru-hiked in canvas sneakers and a drawstring duffleto Bill Bryson, author of the best-selling A Walk in the Woods, the AT has seized the American imagination like no other hiking path.

The 2,000-mile-long hike from Georgia to Maine is not just a trail through the woods, but a set of ideas about nature etched in the forest floor. This character-driven biography of the trail is a must-read not just for ambitious hikers, but for anyone who wonders about our relationship with the great outdoors and dreams of getting away from urban life for a pilgrimage in the wild.


3. Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed: Revised Edition

Author: by Jared Diamond
B004H0M8EA
Penguin Books
January 4, 2011

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In Jared Diamond’s follow-up to the Pulitzer-Prize winning Guns, Germs and Steel, the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions for the collapse of civilization. Diamond is also the author of Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in CrisisEnvironmental damage, climate change, globalization, rapid population growth, and unwise political choices were all factors in the demise of societies around the world, but some found solutions and persisted.

As in Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond traces the fundamental pattern of catastrophe, and weaves an all-encompassing global thesis through a series of fascinating historical-cultural narratives. Collapse moves from the Polynesian cultures on Easter Island to the flourishing American civilizations of the Anasazi and the Maya and finally to the doomed Viking colony on Greenland.

Similar problems face us today and have already brought disaster to Rwanda and Haiti, even as China and Australia are trying to cope in innovative ways. Despite our own society’s apparently inexhaustible wealth and unrivaled political power, ominous warning signs have begun to emerge even in ecologically robust areas like Montana.


4. The Silk Roads: A New History of the World

Author: by Peter Frankopan
B00XN8UG3C
Bloomsbury Publishing
August 27, 2015

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The sun is setting on the Western world. Slowly but surely, the direction in which the world spins has reversed: where for the last five centuries the globe turned westwards on its axis, it now turns to the east. For centuries, fame and fortune was to be found in the west in the New World of the Americas.

Today, it is the east which calls out to those in search of adventure and riches. The region stretching from eastern Europe and sweeping right across Central Asia deep into China and India, is taking centre stage in international politics, commerce and culture and is shaping the modern world.

This region, the true centre of the earth, is obscure to many in the English-speaking world. Yet this is where civilization itself began, where the world’s great religions were born and took root. The Silk Roads were no exotic series of connections, but networks that linked continents and oceans together.

Along them flowed ideas, goods, disease and death. This was where empires were won and where they were lost. As a new era emerges, the patterns of exchange are mirroring those that have criss-crossed Asia for millennia. The Silk Roads are rising again.


5. Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World (Politics of Place)

Author: by Tim Marshall
Scribner Book Company
English
320 pages

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In this New York Times bestseller, an award-winning journalist uses ten maps of crucial regions to explain the geo-political strategies of the world powersfans of geography, history, and politics (and maps) will be enthralled (Fort Worth Star-Telegram). Maps have a mysterious hold over us.

Whether ancient, crumbling parchments or generated by Google, maps tell us things we want to know, not only about our current location or where we are going but about the world in general. And yet, when it comes to geo-politics, much of what we are told is generated by analysts and other experts who have neglected to refer to a map of the place in question.

All leaders of nations are constrained by geography. In one of the best books about geopolitics (The Evening Standard), now updated to include 2016 geopolitical developments, journalist Tim Marshall examines Russia, China, the US, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Greenland and the Arctictheir weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and bordersto provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders.


6. The Sound of the Sea: Seashells and the Fate of the Oceans

Author: by Cynthia Barnett
English
432 pages
0393651444

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A compelling history of seashells and the animals that make them, revealing what they have to tell us about nature, our changing oceans, and ourselves. Seashells have been the most coveted and collected of nature’s creations since the dawn of humanity.

They were money before coins, jewelry before gems, art before canvas. In The Sound of the Sea, acclaimed environmental author Cynthia Barnett blends cultural history and science to trace our long love affair with seashells and the hidden lives of the mollusks that make them.

Spiraling out from the great cities of shell that once rose in North America to the warming waters of the Maldives and the slave castles of Ghana, Barnett has created an unforgettable account of the world’s most iconic seashells. She begins with their childhood wonder, unwinds surprising histories like the origin of Shell Oil as a family business importing exotic shells, and charts what shells and the soft animals that build them are telling scientists about our warming, acidifying seas.


7. American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Author: by Colin Woodard
0143122029
Penguin Books
English

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A New Republic Best Book of the Year The Globalist Top Books of the Year Winner of the Maine Literary Award for Non-fiction Particularly relevant in understanding who voted for who in this presidential election year, this is an endlessly fascinating look at American regionalism and the eleven nations that continue to shape North AmericaAccording to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots.

In American Nations he takes readers on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, offering a revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity, and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future.

From the Deep South to the Far West, to Yankeedom to El Norte, Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how each region continues to uphold its distinguishing ideals and identities today, with results that can be seen in the composition of the U.S.


8. World War II Map by Map

Author: by DK
DK
English
288 pages

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Trace the epic history of World War 2 across the globe with more than 100 detailed maps. In this stunning visual history book, custom maps tell the story of the Second World War from the rise of the Axis powers to the dropping of the atom bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Each map is rich with detail and graphics, helping you to chart the progress of key events of World War II on land, sea, and air, such as the Dunkirk evacuation, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the D-Day landings, and the siege of Stalingrad.

Historical maps from both Allied and Axis countries also offer unique insights into the events. There are timelines to help you follow the story as it unfolds, while narrative overviews explain the social, economic, political, and technical developments at the time.

Fascinating, large-scale pictures introduce topics such as the Holocaust, blitzkrieg, kamikaze warfare, and code-breaking. Written by a team of historians in consultation with Richard Overy, World War II Map by Map examines how the deadliest conflict in history changed the face of our world.


9. ESV Archaeology Study Bible

Author: by ESV Bibles
Crossway (April 24, 2018)
English
2048 pages

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Winner of the ECPA Book of the Year Award for Bibles Explore the Ancient World Behind the Written Word Created by a team of field-trained archaeologists, this highly illustrative Bible features brand-new notes and hundreds of helpful maps and photographs.

2,000+ study notes, 400+ full-color photographs, 200+ maps and diagrams, 15 articles, 4 timelines, and more. The ESV Archaeology Study Bible roots the biblical text in its historical and cultural context, offering readers a framework for better understanding the people, places, and events recorded in Scripture.

With editorial oversight from Dr. John Currid (PhD, University of Chicago) and Dr. David Chapman (PhD, University of Cambridge), as well as contributions from a team of field-trained archaeologists, the ESV Archaeology Study Bible assembles a range of modern scholarshippairing the biblical text with over 2,000 study notes, 400 full-color photographs, 200 maps and diagrams, 200 sidebars, 14 articles, and 4 timelines.

10. Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World

Author: by Simon Winchester
Harper (January 19, 2021)
English

464 pages

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In many ways, Land combines bits and pieces of many of Winchester’s previous books into a satisfying, globe-trotting whole…. Winchester is, once again, a consummate guide. Boston GlobeThe author of The Professor and the Madman, The Map That Changed the World, and The Perfectionists explores the notion of propertybought, earned, or received; in Europe, Africa, North America, or the South Pacificthrough human history, how it has shaped us and what it will mean for our future.

Landwhether meadow or mountainside, desert or peat bog, parkland or pasture, suburb or cityis central to our existence. It quite literally underlies and underpins everything. Employing the keen intellect, insatiable curiosity, and narrative verve that are the foundations of his previous bestselling works, Simon Winchester examines what we human beings are doingand have donewith the billions of acres that together make up the solid surface of our planet.

Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World examines in depth how we acquire land, how we steward it, how and why we fight over it, and finally, how we can, and on occasion do, come to share it.

11. Atlas of Indian Nations

Author: by Anton Treuer
National Geographic
English
320 pages

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Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell. In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography.

This illustrated atlas is perfect for fans of Empire of the Summer Moon, Blood and Thunder, and National Geographic atlases, as well as those fascinated with the Old West. Organized by region, this encyclopedic reference details Indian tribes in these areas: beliefs, sustenance, shelter, alliances and animosities, key historical events, and more.

See the linguistic groupings and understand the constantly shifting, overlapping boundaries of the tribes. Follow the movement, growth, decline, and continuity of Indian nations and their lifestyles.

12. Voyagers: The Settlement of the Pacific (The Landmark Library)

Author: by Nicholas Thomas
B081T45WXN
Apollo (January 7, 2021)
January 7, 2021

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From an award-winning scholar, the extraordinary sixty-thousand-year history of how the Pacific islands were settled. Thousands of islands, inhabited by a multitude of different peoples, are scattered across the vastness of the Pacific. The first European explorers to visit Oceania, from the sixteenth century on, were astounded and perplexed to find populations thriving so many miles from the nearest continents.

Who were these people? Where did they come from? And how were they able to reach islands dispersed over such immense tracts of ocean? In Voyagers, the distinguished anthropologist Nicholas Thomas charts the course of the seaborne migrations that populated the islands between Asia and the Americas.

From the third millennium BC, the Philippines, Indonesia, Micronesia and Melanesia were settled by Austronesian peoples of the western Pacific littoral. Later movements of Polynesian peoples took them even further afield, as far as Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Tahiti, the Marquesas, Easter Island and eventually New Zealand, up to AD 1250.

13. Address Book

Author: by Deirdre Mask
Griffin
English
336 pages

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Finalist for the 2020 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction | One of Time Magazines’s 100 Must-Read Books of 2020 | Finalist for the Goodreads Choice Awards, Best History & Biography 2020 | Longlisted for the 2020 Porchlight Business Book Awards”An entertaining quest to trace the origins and implications of the names of the roads on which we reside.” Sarah Vowell, The New York Times Book Review When most people think about street addresses, if they think of them at all, it is in their capacity to ensure that the postman can deliver mail or a traveler won’t get lost.

But street addresses were not invented to help you find your way; they were created to find you. In many parts of the world, your address can reveal your race and class. In this wide-ranging and remarkable book, Deirdre Mask looks at the fate of streets named after Martin Luther King Jr., the wayfinding means of ancient Romans, and how Nazis haunt the streets of modern Germany.

The flipside of having an address is not having one, and we also see what that means for millions of people today, including those who live in the slums of Kolkata and on the streets of London. Filled with fascinating people and histories, The Address Book illuminates the complex and sometimes hidden stories behind street names and their power to name, to hide, to decide who counts, who doesn’tand why.

14. The Sky Atlas: The Greatest Maps, Myths, and Discoveries of the Universe (Historical Maps of the Stars and Planets, Night Sky and Astronomy Lover Gift)

Author: by Edward Brooke-Hitching
Chronicle Books
English
255 pages

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The Sky Atlas unveils some of the most beautiful maps and charts ever created during humankind’s quest to map the skies above us. This richly illustrated treasury showcases the finest examples of celestial cartographya glorious art often overlooked by modern map booksas well as medieval manuscripts, masterpiece paintings, ancient star catalogs, antique instruments, and other curiosities.

This is the sky as it has never been presented before: the realm of stars and planets, but also of gods, devils, weather wizards, flying sailors, ancient aliens, mythological animals, and rampaging spirits. Packed with celestial maps, illustrations, and stories of places, people, and creatures that different cultures throughout history have observed or imagined in the heavens Readers are taken on a tour of star-obsessed cultures around the world, learning about Tibetan sky burials, star-covered Inuit dancing coats, Mongolian astral prophets and Sir William Herschel’s 1781 discovery of Uranus, the first planet to be found since antiquity.

15. The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps (Historical Map and Mythology Book, Geography Book of Ancient and Antique Maps)

Author: by Edward Brooke-Hitching
Chronicle Books
English
256 pages

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Discover the mysteries within ancient maps – Where exploration and mythology meetThis richly illustrated book collects and explores the colorful histories behind a striking range of real antique maps that are all in some way a little too good to be true.

Mysteries within ancient maps: The Phantom Atlas is a guide to the world not as it is, but as it was imagined to be. It’s a world of ghost islands, invisible mountain ranges, mythical civilizations, ship-wrecking beasts, and other fictitious features introduced on maps and atlases through mistakes, misunderstanding, fantasies, and outright lies.

Where exploration and mythology meet: Author Edward Brooke-Hitching is a map collector, author, writer for the popular BBC Television program QI and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He lives in a dusty heap of old maps and books in London investigating the places where exploration and mythology meet.

Cartography’s greatest phantoms: The Phantom Atlas uses gorgeous atlas images as springboards for tales of deranged buccaneers, seafaring monks, heroes, swindlers, and other amazing stories behind cartography’s greatest phantoms. If you are a fan of this popular genre and a reader of books such as Prisoners of Geography, Atlas of Ancient Rome, Atlas Obscura, What If, Book of General Ignorance, or Thing Explainer, your will love The Phantom Atlas

16. Himalaya: A Human History

Author: by Ed Douglas
English
592 pages
0393541991

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A magisterial history of the Himalaya: an epic story of peoples, cultures, and adventures among the world’s highest mountains. For centuries, the unique and astonishing geography of the Himalaya has attracted those in search of spiritual and literal elevation: pilgrims, adventurers, and mountaineers seeking to test themselves among the world’s most spectacular and challenging peaks.

But far from being wild and barren, the Himalaya has been home to a diversity of indigenous and local cultures, a crucible of world religions, a crossroads for trade, and a meeting point and conflict zone for empires past and present.

In this landmark work, nearly two decades in the making, Ed Douglas makes a thrilling case for the Himalaya’s importance in global history and offers a soaring account of life at the “roof of the world.”Spanning millennia, from the earliest inhabitants to the present conflicts over Tibet and Everest, Himalaya explores history, culture, climate, geography, and politics.