Best Historical Japan Biographies Books

Here you will get Best Historical Japan Biographies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books for you.

1. The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months That Changed the World

Author: by A. J. Baime
Mariner Books
English
464 pages

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[A] well-judged and hugely readable book … Few are as entertaining. Dominic Sandbrook, Sunday Times A.J.Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color. Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances, and through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history.

Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death.

The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan, and finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War.


2. Hiroshima

Author: by John Hersey
English
152 pages
1684116880

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On August 6, 1945, Hiroshima was destroyed by the first atom bomb ever dropped on a city. This book, John Hersey’s journalistic masterpiece, tells what happened on that day. Told through the memories of survivors, this timeless, powerful and compassionate document has become a classic “that stirs the conscience of humanity” (The New York Times).

Almost four decades after the original publication of this celebrated book, John Hersey went back to Hiroshima in search of the people whose stories he had told. His account of what he discovered about them is now the eloquent and moving final chapter of Hiroshima.


3. Truman

Author: by David McCullough
Simon & Schuster
English
1120 pages

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The Pulitzer Prizewinning biography of Harry S. Truman, whose presidency included momentous events from the atomic bombing of Japan to the outbreak of the Cold War and the Korean War, told by America’s beloved and distinguished historian. The life of Harry S.

Truman is one of the greatest of American stories, filled with vivid charactersRoosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Eleanor Roosevelt, Bess Wallace Truman, George Marshall, Joe McCarthy, and Dean Achesonand dramatic events. In this riveting biography, acclaimed historian David McCullough not only captures the mana more complex, informed, and determined man than ever before imaginedbut also the turbulent times in which he rose, boldly, to meet unprecedented challenges.

The last president to serve as a living link between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, Truman’s story spans the raw world of the Missouri frontier, World War I, the powerful Pendergast machine of Kansas City, the legendary Whistle-Stop Campaign of 1948, and the decisions to drop the atomic bomb, confront Stalin at Potsdam, send troops to Korea, and fire General MacArthur.


4. Rising Son: A US Soldier's Secret and Heroic Role in World War II

Author: by Sandra Vea
B07CWFH42J
February 12, 2019
English

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The remarkable World War II biography of a Japanese American who served in a top-secret team tasked with subduing Japanese Imperial soldiers during the Pacific War Masao Abe was a second-generation Japanese American who was swept up in the momentum of history during World War II.

Born in southern California but educated as a teenager in Japan during the 1930s, he returned to the US and was drafted into the US Army. As he completed basic training, the attack on Pearl Harbor put his military career in limbo because the US government didn’t know what to do with him or how to think about him.

Was he an enemy or a patriot? Masao was eventually recruited to join the secretive Military Intelligence Service: he was trained to accompany American soldiers as they fought their way across the islands in the Pacific. His assignment was to convince Japanese Imperial soldiers to lay down their arms, and to read captured documents looking for enemy strategies.

He went to war with a bodyguard because his commanders knew he wore a target on his front and his back. This little-known slice of history reveals how the confluence of race, war, and loyalty played out when the nation called for the service of those it judged most harshly.


5. Unknown Valor: A Story of Family, Courage, and Sacrifice from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima

Author: by Martha MacCallum
Harper
English
336 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER. In honor of the 75th Anniversary of one of the most critical battles of World War II, the popular primetime Fox News anchor of The Story with Martha MacCallum pays tribute to the heroic men who sacrificed everything at Iwo Jima to defeat the Armed Forces of Emperor Hirohitoamong them, a member of her own family, Harry Gray.

Admiral Chester Nimitz spoke of the uncommon valor of the men who fought on Iwo Jima, one of the bloodiest and most brutal battles of World War II. In thirty-six grueling days, nearly 7,000 Marines were killed and 22,000 were wounded. Martha MacCallum takes us from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima through the lives of these men of valor, among them Harry Gray, a member of her own family.

In Unknown Valor, she weaves their storiesfrom Boston, Massachusetts, to Gulfport, Mississippi, as told through letters and recollectionsinto the larger history of what American military leaders rightly saw as an eventual showdown in the Pacific with Japan. In a relentless push through the jungles of Guadalcanal, over the coral reefs of Tarawa, past the bloody ridge of Peleliu, against the banzai charges of Guam, and to the cliffs of Saipan, these men were on a path that ultimately led to the black sands of Iwo Jima, the doorstep of the Japanese Empire.


6. African Samurai: The True Story of Yasuke, a Legendary Black Warrior in Feudal Japan

Author: by Geoffrey Girard
Hanover Square Press
English
480 pages

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“A readable, compassionate account of an extraordinary life. The Washington PostThe remarkable life of history’s first foreign-born samurai, and his astonishing journey from Northeast Africa to the heights of Japanese society.Warrior.Samurai.Legend. When Yasuke arrived in Japan in the late 1500s, he had already traversed much of the known world.

Kidnapped as a child in Northeast Africa, he served as a bodyguard to the head of the Jesuits in Asia, traveling to India and China, and eventually arriving in Japan, where everything would change. Most Japanese people had never seen an African man before.

Some believed he was a god. Others saw him as the black-skinned Buddha. Among those drawn to him was Lord Nobunaga, head of the most powerful clan in Japan, who made Yasuke a samurai in his court. Soon, Yasuke was learning the traditions of martial arts and ascending the upper echelons of Japanese society, where he would live on to become a legend for the centuries to come.


7. People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo–and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up

Author: by Richard Lloyd Parry
Farrar, Straus & Giroux
English
454 pages

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Lucie Blackmantall, blond, twenty-one years oldstepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000, and disappeared forever. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, covered Lucie’s disappearance and followed the massive search for her, the long investigation, and the even longer trial.

Over ten years, he earned the trust of her family and friends, won unique access to the Japanese detectives and Japan’s convoluted legal system, and delved deep into the mind of the man accused of the crime, Joji Obara, described by the judge as “unprecedented and extremely evil.” The result is a book at once thrilling and revelatory, “In Cold Blood for our times” (Chris Cleave, author of Incendiary and Little Bee).

The People Who Eat Darkness is one of Publishers Weekly’s Top 10 Best Books of 2012


8. Theodore Rex

Author: by Edmund Morris
English
792 pages
0812966007

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Theodore Rex is the storynever fully told beforeof Theodore Roosevelt’s two world-changing terms as President of the United States. A hundred years before the catastrophe of September 11, 2001, TR succeeded to power in the aftermath of an act of terrorism. Youngest of all our chief executives, he rallied a stricken nation with his superhuman energy, charm, and political skills.

He proceeded to combat the problems of race and labor relations and trust control while making the Panama Canal possible and winning the Nobel Peace Prize. But his most historic achievement remains his creation of a national conservation policy, and his monument millions of acres of protected parks and forest.

Theodore Rex ends with TR leaving office, still only fifty years old, his future reputation secure as one of our greatest presidents.


9. A Song for Nagasaki: The Story of Takashi Nagai: Scientist, Convert, and Survivor of the Atomic Bomb

Author: by Paul Glynn
Ignatius Press
English
267 pages

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On August 9, 1945, an American B-29 dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, killing tens of thousands of people in the blink of an eye, while fatally injuring and poisoning thousands more. Among the survivors was Takashi Nagai, a pioneer in radiology research and a convert to the Catholic Faith.

Living in the rubble of the ruined city and suffering from leukemia caused by over-exposure to radiation, Nagai lived out the remainder of his remarkable life by bringing physical and spiritual healing to his war-weary people. A Song for Nagasaki tells the moving story of this extraordinary man, beginning with his boyhood and the heroic tales and stoic virtues of his family’s Shinto religion.

It reveals the inspiring story of Nagai’s remarkable spiritual journey from Shintoism to atheism to Catholicism. Mixed with interesting details about Japanese history and culture, the biography traces Nagai’s spiritual quest as he studied medicine at Nagasaki University, served as a medic with the Japanese army during its occupation of Manchuria, and returned to Nagasaki to dedicate himself to the science of radiology.

10. The Forgotten Highlander: An Incredible WWII Story of Survival in the Pacific

Author: by Alistair Urquhart
Skyhorse
English
320 pages

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Riveting, powerful, moving. The Observer, Compelling … A book that must be read.Daily Mail. A story of almost unimaginable suffering.BBC Radio 4. Urquhart grabs our attention with unforgettable stories. Minneapolis Star-TribuneThis is the extraordinary story of a young man, conscripted at nineteen, who survived not just one but three separate encounters with deathencounters which killed nearly all his comrades.

Silent for over fifty years, this is Alistair Urquhart’s extraordinary, moving, and inspirational tale of survival against the odds. Alistair Urquhart was among the Gordon Highlanders captured by the Japanese in Singapore during World War II. He not only survived 750 days in the jungle working as a slave on the notorious death railway and the bridge on the River Kwai, but he was subsequently taken prisoner on one of the Japanese hellships which was later torpedoed, killing nearly everyone on boardbut not Urquhart.

He spent five days adrift on a raft in the South China Sea before being rescued by a Japanese whaling ship. He was then taken to Japan and forced to work in a mine near Nagasaki. Two months later he was struck by the blast from the atomic bombdropped just ten miles away.

11. The Pillow Book (Penguin Classics)

Author: by Sei Shonagon
Penguin Classics
English
416 pages

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The classic portrayal of court life in tenth-century Japan Written by the court gentlewoman Sei Shonagon, ostensibly for her own amusement, The Pillow Book offers a fascinating exploration of life among the nobility at the height of the Heian period, describing the exquisite pleasures of a confined world in which poetry, love, fashion, and whim dominated, while harsh reality was kept firmly at a distance.

Moving elegantly across a wide range of themes including nature, society, and her own flirtations, Sei Shonagon provides a witty and intimate window on a woman’s life at court in classical Japan. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

12. Japanese Destroyer Captain: Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, Midway – The Great Naval Battles as Seen Through Japanese Eyes

Author: by Capt. Tameichi Hara
Naval Institute Press
English
336 pages

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This highly regarded war memoir was a best seller in both Japan and the United States during the 1960s and has long been treasured by historians for its insights into the Japanese side of the surface war in the Pacific.

The author was a survivor of more than one hundred sorties against the Allies and was known throughout Japan as the “Unsinkable Captain.” A hero to his countrymen, Capt. Hara exemplified the best in Japanese surface commanders: highly skilled (he wrote the manual on torpedo warfare), hard driving, and aggressive.

Moreover, he maintained a code of honor worthy of his samurai grandfather, and, as readers of this book have come to appreciate, he was as free with praise for American courage and resourcefulness as he was critical of himself and his senior commanders.

13. The Last Fighter Pilot: The True Story of the Final Combat Mission of World War II

Author: by Don Brown
Regnery History
English
352 pages

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A NATIONAL BESTSELLER! The New York Post calls The Last Fighter Pilot a “must-read” book. From April to August of 1945, Captain Jerry Yellin and a small group of fellow fighter pilots flew dangerous bombing and strafe missions out of Iwo Jima over Japan.

Even days after America dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima on August 6 and Nagasaki on August 9, the pilots continued to fly. Though Japan had suffered unimaginable devastation, the emperor still refused to surrender. Bestselling author Don Brown (Treason) sits down with Yelllin, now ninety-three years old, to tell the incredible true story of the final combat mission of World War II.

Nine days after Hiroshima, on the morning of August 14th, Yellin and his wingman 1st Lieutenant Phillip Schlamberg took off from Iwo Jima to bomb Tokyo. By the time Yellin returned to Iwo Jima, the war was officially overbut his young friend Schlamberg would never get to hear the news.

The Last Fighter Pilot is a harrowing first-person account of war from one of America’s last living World War II veterans.

14. Obachan: A Young Girl’s Struggle for Freedom in Twentieth-Century Japan

Author: by Tani Hanes
B08BJQ34PZ
June 19, 2020
English

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Filled with never before seen photos from the period that bring Obachan’s story to life. Mitsuko Hanamura was born wanting very little out of life: a place to call her own, maybe a small garden where she could grow flowers, just a little house with a shelf for some books, where she could live alone, with no need to share a bed, or a meal, or clothes, with anyone.

But she was born in 1916 in rural Japan, the oldest girl in a family with eight children and no money, with nothing to depend on but her clever brain and indomitable spirit. Sent away at thirteen to live with relatives, hired out at fifteen to pay off a family debt, desperate for an education at any cost, this is the story of a young girl who never gave up on herself, no matter what her circumstances, no matter how bleak her life seemed to be.

It is the story of my Obachan, or grandmother, as told to me by her, an amazing story which begins in the countryside of Japan and ends in the war torn streets of Kawasaki. I wrote it down as I heard it, believing it sounded more like a movie than her life; only the names have been changed out of respect for her living family.

15. The Good War: An Oral History of World War II

Author: by Studs Terkel
The New Press
English
608 pages

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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize: The richest and most powerful single document of the American experience in World War II (The Boston Globe). The Good War is a testament not only to the experience of war but to the extraordinary skill of Studs Terkel as an interviewer and oral historian.

From a pipe fitter’s apprentice at Pearl Harbor to a crew member of the flight that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, his subjects are open and unrelenting in their analyses of themselves and their experiences, producing what People magazine has called a splendid epic history of WWII.

With this volume Terkel expanded his scope to the global and the historical, and the result is a masterpiece of oral history. Tremendously compelling, somehow dramatic and intimate at the same time, as if one has stumbled on private accounts in letters locked in attic trunks …

In terms of plain human interest, Mr. Terkel may well have put together the most vivid collection of World War II sketches ever gathered between covers. The New York Times Book Review I promise you will remember your war years, if you were alive then, with extraordinary vividness as you go through Studs Terkel’s book.

16. No Surrender: My Thirty-Year War

Author: by Hiroo Onoda
English
224 pages
1557506639

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In the Spring of 1974, 2nd Lt. Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese army made world headlines when he emerged from the Philippine jungle after a thirty-year ordeal. Hunted in turn by American troops, the Philippine army and police, hostile islanders, and eventually successive Japanese search parties, Onoda had skillfully outmaneuvered all his pursuers, convinced that World War II was still being fought and waiting for the day when his fellow soldiers would return victorious.

This first-person account of those years of evading capture and trying to stay alive is filled with drama, tension, and excitement. Readers learn about Onoda’s early life, his training as an intelligence officer, and his final assignment to the Philippine island of Lubang.

When American forces take over the island, he retreats into the mountains and life becomes a constant battle against the elements as well as the enemy. The description of his selfless dedication to a cause allows us a rare glimpse of the invincible spirit of the human being, and his ingenuity in adapting to primitive surroundings is a commentary on man’s resourcefulness.