Best Historical Latin America Biographies Books

Here you will get Best Historical Latin America Biographies Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books for you.

1. Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother

Author: by Sonia Nazario
English
299 pages
0812971787

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An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and morethe definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.

Enrique’s Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops.

But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.


2. The Undocumented Americans

Author: by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio
One World
English
208 pages

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NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST One of the first undocumented immigrants to graduate from Harvard reveals the hidden lives of her fellow undocumented Americans in this deeply personal and groundbreaking portrait of a nation. Karla’s book sheds light on people’s personal experiences and allows their stories to be told and their voices to be heard.

Selena Gomez LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST LONGLISTED FOR THE PORCHLIGHT BUSINESS BOOK AWARD NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VULTURE AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Book Review Time NPR The New York Public Library Book Riot Library JournalWriter Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name.

It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she’d tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell. So she wrote her immigration lawyer’s phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrantsand to find the hidden key to her own.


3. The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey

Author: by Candice Millard
0767913736
Broadway Books
English

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At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth. The River of Doubtit is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world.

Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon.

Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cndido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever.

Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide.


4. Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

Author: by S. C. Gwynne
Scribner
English
688 pages

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Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the epic New York Times bestselling account of how Civil War general Thomas Stonewall Jackson became a great and tragic national hero. Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance.

As much as any person in the Confederate pantheoneven Robert E. Leehe embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country’s greatest military figures. In April 1862, however, he was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause.

But by June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.

In his magnificent Rebel YellS.C. Gwynne brings Jackson ferociously to life (New York Newsday) in a swiftly vivid narrative that is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict among historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson’s private life and traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.


5. Papillon (P.S.)

Author: by Henri Charriere
0061120669
English
576 pages

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A modern classic of courage and excitement. The New Yorker Soon to be a Major Motion Picture Starring Charlie Hunnam and Rami MalekHenri Charrire, nicknamed “Papillon,” for the butterfly tattoo on his chest, was convicted in Paris in 1931 of a murder he did not commit.

Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana, he became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison, Devil’s Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped …Until Papillon.

His flight to freedom remains one of the most incredible feats of human cunning, will, and endurance ever undertaken. Charrire’s astonishing autobiography, Papillon, was first published in France to instant acclaim in 1968, more than twenty years after his final escape.

Since then, it has become a treasured classic-the gripping, shocking, ultimately uplifting odyssey of an innocent man who would not be defeated. A first-class adventure story. New York Review of Books


6. Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors

Author: by Piers Paul Read
Avon
English
318 pages

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On October 12, 1972, a plane carrying a team of young rugby players crashed into the remote, snow-peaked Andes. Out of the forty-five original passengers and crew, only sixteen made it off the mountain alive. For ten excruciating weeks they suffered deprivations beyond imagining, confronting nature head-on at its most furious and inhospitable.

And to survive, they were forced to do what would have once been unthinkable … This is their story – one of the most astonishing true adventures of the twentieth century.


7. The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey

Author: by Ernesto Che Guevara
Ocean Press
English
175 pages

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The book of the popular movie STARRING GAEL GARCIA BERNAL NOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The young Che Guevara’s lively and highly entertaining travel diary, now a popular movie and a New York Times bestseller. This new, expanded edition features exclusive, unpublished photos taken by the 23-year-old Ernesto on his journey across a continent, and a tender preface by Aleida Guevara, offering an insightful perspective on the man and the icon.

A journey, a number of journeys. Ernesto Guevara in search of adventure, Ernesto Guevara in search of America, Ernesto Guevara in search of Che. On this journey of journeys, solitude found solidarity, I’ turned into we’. Eduardo Galeano When I read these notes for the first time, I was quite young myself and I immediately identified with this man who narrated his adventures in such a spontaneous manner To tell you the truth, the more I read, the more I was in love with the boy my father had been Aleida Guevara Our film is about a young man, Che, falling in love with a continent and finding his place in it.


8. The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple

Author: by Jeff Guinn
Simon & Schuster
English
544 pages

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2018 Edgar Award FinalistBest Fact CrimeA thoroughly readable, thoroughly chilling account of a brilliant con man and his all-too vulnerable prey (The Boston Globe)the definitive story of preacher Jim Jones, who was responsible for the Jonestown Massacre, the largest murder-suicide in American history, by the New York Times bestselling author of Manson.

In the 1950s, a young Indianapolis minister named Jim Jones preached a curious blend of the gospel and Marxism. His congregation was racially mixed, and he was a leader in the early civil rights movement. Eventually, Jones moved his church, Peoples Temple, to northern California, where he got involved in electoral politics and became a prominent Bay Area leader.

But underneath the surface lurked a terrible darkness. In this riveting narrative, Jeff Guinn examines Jones’s life, from his early days as an idealistic minister to a secret life of extramarital affairs, drug use, and fraudulent faith healing, before the fateful decision to move almost a thousand of his followers to a settlement in the jungles of Guyana in South America.


9. Be Bold! Be Brave!: 11 Latinas who made U.S. History (English and Spanish Edition)

Author: by Naibe Reynoso
English
33 pages
1733710329

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Be Bold!Be Brave!11 American Latinas who made U.S.History, S Audaz!S Valiente!: 11 Latinas que hicieron historia en los Estados Unidos is a bilingual book that highlights 11 Latinas who excelled in their professions and made U.S. History by accomplishing something that hadn’t been done before in various fields including medicine, science, sports, art and politics.

By presenting the true biographical stories of these outstanding Latinas in rhyming verses, young readers will easily follow their journey to success. Some of the women highlighted include Antonia Novello (first female Surgeon General in the U.S., Ellen Ochoa (first Latina to go to space), Sonia Sotomayor (first Latina Supreme Court Justice,) Rita Moreno (first Latina to win an Oscar), and Pura Belpre (first Latina to incorporate and promote bilingual literacy in Public Libraries).

10. Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life (Revised Edition)

Author: by Jon Lee Anderson
Grove Press
English
672 pages

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A New York Times Notable Book of the year. Acclaimed around the world and a national best-seller, this is the definitive work on Che Guevara, the dashing rebel whose epic dream was to end poverty and injustice in Latin America and the developing world through armed revolution.

Jon Lee Anderson’s biography traces Che’s extraordinary life, from his comfortable Argentine upbringing to the battlefields of the Cuban revolution, from the halls of power in Castro’s government to his failed campaign in the Congo and assassination in the Bolivian jungle.

Anderson has had unprecedented access to the personal archives maintained by Guevara’s widow and carefully guarded Cuban government documents. He has conducted extensive interviews with Che’s comradessome of whom speak here for the first timeand with the CIA men and Bolivian officers who hunted him down.

Anderson broke the story of where Guevara’s body was buried, which led to the exhumation and state burial of the bones. Many of the details of Che’s life have long been cloaked in secrecy and intrigue. Meticulously researched and full of exclusive information, Che Guevara illuminates as never before this mythic figure who embodied the high-water mark of revolutionary communism as a force in history.

11. A Stranger Among Saints: Stephen Hopkins, the Man Who Survived Jamestown and Saved Plymouth

Author: by Jonathan Mack
English
272 pages
164160090X

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In 1609, on a voyage to resupply England’s troubled Jamestown colony, the Sea Venture was caught in a hurricane and shipwrecked off the coast of Bermuda. The tale of its marooned survivors eventually inspired William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, but for one castaway it was only the beginning.

A Stranger Among Saints traces the life of Stephen Hopkins, who spent ten months stranded with the Sea Venture crew, during which he was charged with attempted mutiny and condemned to dieonly to have his sentence commuted just before it was carried out.

Hopkins eventually made it to Jamestown, where he spent six years before returning to England and signing on to another colonial venture, this time with a group of religious radicals on the Mayflower. Hopkins was the only member of the party who had been across the Atlantic beforethe only one who’d encountered America’s native people and land.

The Pilgrims, plagued by disease and contentious early encounters with indigenous Americans, turned to him for leadership. Hopkins played a vital role in bridging the divide of suspicion between the English immigrants and their native neighbors. Without him, these settlers would likely not have lasted through that brutal first year.

12. Nuestra América: My Family in the Vertigo of Translation

Author: by Claudio Lomnitz
English
464 pages
1635420709

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NAMED A MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWSA riveting study of the intersections between Jewish and Latin American culture, this immigrant family memoir recounts history with psychological insight and the immediacy of a thriller. In Nuestra Amrica, eminent anthropologist and historian Claudio Lomnitz traces his grandparents’ exile from Eastern Europe to South America.

At the same time, the book is a pretext to explain and analyze the worldview, culture, and spirit of countries such as Peru, Colombia, and Chile, from the perspective of educated Jewish emigrants imbued with the hope and determination typical of those who escaped Europe in the 1920s.

Lomnitz’s grandparents, who were both trained to defy ghetto life with the pioneering spirit of the early Zionist movement, became intensely involved in the Peruvian leftist intellectual milieu and its practice of connecting Peru’s indigenous past to an emancipatory internationalism that included Jewish culture and thought.

13. Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time

Author: by Mark Adams
Dutton
English
333 pages

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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING TRAVEL MEMOIRWhat happens when an unadventurous adventure writer tries to re-create the original expedition to Machu Picchu? In 1911, Hiram Bingham III climbed into the Andes Mountains of Peru and discovered Machu Picchu. While history has recast Bingham as a villain who stole both priceless artifacts and credit for finding the great archeological site, Mark Adams set out to retrace the explorer’s perilous path in search of the truthexcept he’d written about adventure far more than he’d actually lived it.

In fact, he’d never even slept in a tent. Turn Right at Machu Picchu is Adams’ fascinating and funny account of his journey through some of the world’s most majestic, historic, and remote landscapes guided only by a hard-as-nails Australian survivalist and one nagging question: Just what was Machu Picchu?

14. Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire

Author: by Carol Jenkins
One World
English
352 pages

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English
400 pages

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From one of China’s most acclaimed writers: a unique, intimate look at the Chinese experience over the last several decades. Framed by ten phrases common in the Chinese vernacular, China in Ten Words uses personal stories and astute analysis to reveal as never before the world’s most populous yet oft-misunderstood nation.

In “Disparity,” for example, Yu Hua illustrates the expanding gaps that separate citizens of the country. In “Copycat,” he depicts the escalating trend of piracy and imitation as a creative new form of revolutionary action. And in “Bamboozle,” he describes the increasingly brazen practices of trickery, fraud, and chicanery that are, he suggests, becoming a way of life at every level of society.

Witty, insightful, and courageous, this is a refreshingly candid vision of the “Chinese miracle” and all of its consequences.