Best History of Medicine Books

Here you will get Best History of Medicine Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Ancient Remedies: Secrets to Healing with Herbs, Essential Oils, CBD, and the Most Powerful Natural Medicine in History

Author: by Dr. Josh Axe
Published at: Little, Brown Spark; 1st edition (February 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-0316496452

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Bestselling author Dr. Josh Axe explains how to treat more than seventy diseases, lose weight, and increase vitality with traditional healing practices passed down through the ages. “Engaging, accessible and comprehensive” (Amy Myers, MD, author of The Autoimmune Solution)Long before the first pharmaceutical companies opened their doors in the 1850s, doctors treated people, not symptoms.

And although we’ve become used to popping pills, Americans have finally had it with the dangerous side effects, addiction and over-prescribingand they’re desperate for an alternative. Here’s the good news: That alternative has been here all along in the form of ancient treatments used for eons in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and Greek medicine.

Ancient Remedies is the first comprehensive layman’s guide that will bring together and explain to the masses the very best of these time-tested practices. In Ancient Remedies, Dr. Axe explores the foundational concepts of ancient healingeating right for your type and living in sync with your circadian clock.


2. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Author: by Rebecca Skloot


Crown (March 8, 2011)

381 pages

9781400052189

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The story of modern medicine and bioethicsand, indeed, race relationsis refracted beautifully, and movingly. Entertainment WeeklyNOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE FROM HBO STARRING OPRAH WINFREY AND ROSE BYRNE ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL (CNN), DEFINING (LITHUB), AND BEST (THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER) BOOKS OF THE DECADE ONE OF ESSENCE’S 50 MOST IMPACTFUL BLACK BOOKS OF THE PAST 50 YEARS WINNER OF THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE HEARTLAND PRIZE FOR NONFICTIONNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review Entertainment Weekly O: The Oprah Magazine NPR Financial Times New York Independent (U.K.Times (U.K.

Publishers Weekly Library Journal Kirkus Reviews Booklist Globe and MailHer name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cellstaken without her knowledgebecame one of the most important tools in medicine: The first immortal human cells grown in culture, which are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.


3. Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present

Author: by Harriet A. Washington
Published at: Anchor; Illustrated edition (January 8, 2008)
ISBN: 978-0767915472

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The first full history of Black America’s shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment. No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read this masterful book that will stir up both controversy and long-needed debate.

From the era of slavery to the present day, starting with the earliest encounters between Black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, Medical Apartheid details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledgea tradition that continues today within some black populations.

It reveals how Blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of Blacks.


4. The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine

Author: by Janice P. Nimura
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (January 19, 2021)
ISBN: 978-0393635546

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New York Times Bestseller “Janice P. Nimura has resurrected Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell in all their feisty, thrilling, trailblazing splendor.” Stacy SchiffElizabeth Blackwell believed from an early age that she was destined for a mission beyond the scope of “ordinary” womanhood.

Though the world at first recoiled at the notion of a woman studying medicine, her intelligence and intensity ultimately won her the acceptance of the male medical establishment. In 1849, she became the first woman in America to receive an M.D.

She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. Together, the Blackwells founded the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children, the first hospital staffed entirely by women.

Both sisters were tenacious and visionary, but their convictions did not always align with the emergence of women’s rightsor with each other. From Bristol, Paris, and Edinburgh to the rising cities of antebellum America, this richly researched new biography celebrates two complicated pioneers who exploded the limits of possibility for women in medicine.


5. The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History

Author: by John M. Barry
Published at: Penguin Books; Revised ed. edition (October 4, 2005)
ISBN: 978-0143036494

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#1 New York Times bestsellerBarry will teach you almost everything you need to know about one of the deadliest outbreaks in human history. Bill Gates”Monumental… An authoritative and disturbing morality tale.”Chicago Tribune The strongest weapon against pandemic is the truth.

Read why in the definitive account of the 1918 Flu Epidemic. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research, The Great Influenza provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon.

As Barry concludes, “The final lesson of 1918, a simple one yet one most difficult to execute, is that… Those in authority must retain the public’s trust. The way to do that is to distort nothing, to put the best face on nothing, to try to manipulate no one.

Lincoln said that first, and best. A leader must make whatever horror exists concrete. Only then will people be able to break it apart.” At the height of World War I, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide.


6. The Radium Girls (The Dark Story of America's Shining Women)

Author: by Kate Moore
Published at: SOURCEBOOKS; 1st edition (March 1, 2018)
ISBN: 978-1492650959

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A New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and Amazon Charts Bestseller! “the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still.”NPR Books The incredible true story of the women who fought America’s Undark danger The Curies’ newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community.

From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War. Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies.

With such a coveted job, these shining girls are the luckiest alive until they begin to fall mysteriously ill. But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women’s cries of corruption.

And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America’s early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers’ rights that will echo for centuries to come.


7. Dissolving Illusions: Disease, Vaccines, and The Forgotten History

Author: by Suzanne Humphries MD
Published at: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 6/27/13 edition (July 27, 2013)
ISBN: 978-1480216891

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Not too long ago, lethal infections were feared in the Western world. Since that time, many countries have undergone a transformation from disease cesspools to much safer, healthier habitats. Starting in the mid-1800s, there was a steady drop in deaths from all infectious diseases, decreasing to relatively minor levels by the early 1900s.

The history of that transformation involves famine, poverty, filth, lost cures, eugenicist doctrine, individual freedoms versus state might, protests and arrests over vaccine refusal, and much more. Today, we are told that medical interventions increased our lifespan and single-handedly prevented masses of deaths.

But is this really true? Dissolving Illusions details facts and figures from long-overlooked medical journals, books, newspapers, and other sources. Using myth-shattering graphs, this book shows that vaccines, antibiotics, and other medical interventions are not responsible for the increase in lifespan and the decline in mortality from infectious diseases.


8. Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine

Author: by Olivia Campbell
Published at: Park Row; Original edition (March 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-0778389392

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For fans of Hidden Figures and Radium Girls comes the remarkable story of three Victorian women who broke down barriers in the medical field to become the first women doctors, revolutionizing the way women receive health care. In the early 1800s, women were dying in large numbers from treatable diseases because they avoided receiving medical care.

Examinations performed by male doctors were often demeaning and even painful. In addition, women faced stigma from illnessa diagnosis could greatly limit their ability to find husbands, jobs or be received in polite society. Motivated by personal loss and frustration over inadequate medical care, Elizabeth Blackwell, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Sophia Jex-Blake fought for a woman’s place in the male-dominated medical field.

For the first time ever, Women in White Coats tells the complete history of these three pioneering women who, despite countless obstacles, earned medical degrees and paved the way for other women to do the same. Though very different in personality and circumstance, together these women built women-run hospitals and teaching collegescreating for the first time medical care for women by women.


9. Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer

Author: by Siddhartha Mukherjee
Published at: Scribner; 1st edition (August 1, 2011)
ISBN: 978-1439170915

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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a documentary from Ken Burns on PBS, this New York Times bestseller is an extraordinary achievement (The New Yorker)a magnificent, profoundly humane biography of cancerfrom its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the twentieth century to cure, control, and conquer it to a radical new understanding of its essence.

Physician, researcher, and award-winning science writer, Siddhartha Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective, and a biographer’s passion. The result is an astonishingly lucid and eloquent chronicle of a disease humans have lived withand perished fromfor more than five thousand years.

The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance, but also of hubris, paternalism, and misperception. Mukherjee recounts centuries of discoveries, setbacks, victories, and deaths, told through the eyes of his predecessors and peers, training their wits against an infinitely resourceful adversary that, just three decades ago, was thought to be easily vanquished in an all-out war against cancer.

10. Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul

Author: by Brandy Schillace

Published at: Simon & Schuster (March 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1982113773

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The mesmerizing biography of a brilliant and eccentric surgeon and his quest to transplant the human soul. In the early days of the Cold War, a spirit of desperate scientific rivalry birthed a different kind of space race: not the race to outer space that we all know, but a race to master the inner space of the human body.

While surgeons on either side of the Iron Curtain competed to become the first to transplant organs like the kidney and heart, a young American neurosurgeon had an even more ambitious thought: Why not transplant the brain? Dr. Robert White was a friend to two popes and a founder of the Vatican’s Commission on Bioethics.

He developed lifesaving neurosurgical techniques still used in hospitals today and was nominated for the Nobel Prize. But like Dr. Jekyll before him, Dr. White had another identity. In his lab, he was waging a battle against the limits of science, and against mortality itselfworking to perfect a surgery that would allow the soul to live on after the human body had died.

11. Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History

Author: by Paul Farmer
Published at: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 17, 2020)
ISBN: 978-0374234324

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“[The] history is as powerfully conveyed as it is tragic …Illuminating … Invaluable.” Steven Johnson, The New York Times Book ReviewIn 2014, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea suffered the worst epidemic of Ebola in history. The brutal virus spread rapidly through a clinical desert where basic health-care facilities were few and far between.

Causing severe loss of life and economic disruption, the Ebola crisis was a major tragedy of modern medicine. But why did it happen, and what can we learn from it? Paul Farmer, the internationally renowned doctor and anthropologist, experienced the Ebola outbreak firsthandPartners in Health, the organization he founded, was among the international responders.

In Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds, he offers the first substantive account of this frightening, fast-moving episode and its implications. In vibrant prose, Farmer tells the harrowing stories of Ebola victims while showing why the medical response was slow and insufficient.

Rebutting misleading claims about the origins of Ebola and why it spread so rapidly, he traces West Africa’s chronic health failures back to centuries of exploitation and injustice. Under formal colonial rule, disease containment was a priority but care was not and the region’s health care woes worsened, with devastating consequences that Farmer traces up to the present.

12. Medical Bondage: Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynecology

Author: by Deirdre Cooper Owens
Published at: University of Georgia Press; Illustrated edition (July 15, 2018)
ISBN: 978-0820354750

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The accomplishments of pioneering doctors such as John Peter Mettauer, James Marion Sims, and Nathan Bozeman are well documented. It is also no secret that these nineteenth-century gynecologists performed experimental caesarean sections, ovariotomies, and obstetric fistula repairs primarily on poor and powerless women.

Medical Bondage breaks new ground by exploring how and why physicians denied these women their full humanity yet valued them as medical superbodies highly suited for medical experimentation. In Medical Bondage, Cooper Owens examines a wide range of scientific literature and less formal communications in which gynecologists created and disseminated medical fictions about their patients, such as their belief that black enslaved women could withstand pain better than white ladies.

Even as they were advancing medicine, these doctors were legitimizing, for decades to come, groundless theories related to whiteness and blackness, men and women, and the inferiority of other races or nationalities. Medical Bondage moves between southern plantations and northern urban centers to reveal how nineteenth-century American ideas about race, health, and status influenced doctor-patient relationships in sites of healing like slave cabins, medical colleges, and hospitals.

13. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers

Author: by Mary Roach
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (May 17, 2004)
ISBN: 978-0393324822

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“One of the funniest and most unusual books of the year…. Gross, educational, and unexpectedly sidesplitting.”Entertainment WeeklyStiff is an oddly compelling, often hilarious exploration of the strange lives of our bodies postmortem. For two thousand years, cadaverssome willingly, some unwittinglyhave been involved in science’s boldest strides and weirdest undertakings.

In this fascinating account, Mary Roach visits the good deeds of cadavers over the centuries and tells the engrossing story of our bodies when we are no longer with them.

14. The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It

Author: by Jason Karlawish
Published at: St. Martin's Press (February 23, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1250218735

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A definitive and compelling book on one of today’s most prevalent illnesses. In 2020, an estimated 5. 8 million Americans had Alzheimer’s, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care.

As more people live beyond their seventies and eighties, the number of patients will rise to an estimated 13.8 million by 2025. Part case studies, part meditation on the past, present and future of the disease, The Problem of Alzheimer’s traces Alzheimer’s from its beginnings to its recognition as a crisis.

While it is an unambiguous account of decades of missed opportunities and our health care systems’ failures to take action, it tells the story of the biomedical breakthroughs that may allow Alzheimer’s to finally be prevented and treated by medicine and also presents an argument for how we can live with dementia: the ways patients can reclaim their autonomy and redefine their sense of self, how families can support their loved ones, and the innovative reforms we can make as a society that would give caregivers and patients better quality of life.

15. The Gene: An Intimate History

Author: by Siddhartha Mukherjee

Published at: Scribner; Reprint edition (May 2, 2017)
ISBN: 978-1476733524

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The #1 NEW YORK TIMES Bestseller The basis for the PBS Ken Burns Documentary The Gene: An Intimate History From the Pulitzer Prizewinning author of The Emperor of All Maladiesa fascinating history of the gene and a magisterial account of how human minds have laboriously, ingeniously picked apart what makes us tick (Elle).

“Sid Mukherjee has the uncanny ability to bring together science, history, and the future in a way that is understandable and riveting, guiding us through both time and the mystery of life itself.” Ken BurnsDr. Siddhartha Mukherjee dazzled readers with his Pulitzer Prize-winning The Emperor of All Maladies in 2010.

That achievement was evidently just a warm-up for his virtuoso performance in The Gene: An Intimate History, in which he braids science, history, and memoir into an epic with all the range and biblical thunder of Paradise Lost (The New York Times).

In this biography Mukherjee brings to life the quest to understand human heredity and its surprising influence on our lives, personalities, identities, fates, and choices. Mukherjee expresses abstract intellectual ideas through emotional stories[and] swaddles his medical rigor with rhapsodic tenderness, surprising vulnerability, and occasional flashes of pure poetry (The Washington Post).

16. The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic–and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Author: by Steven Johnson
Published at: Riverhead Books; Illustrated edition (October 2, 2007)
ISBN: 978-1594482694

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A National Bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book, and an Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year It’s the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure-garbage removal, clean water, sewers-necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure.

As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories of the spread of disease, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.Read more Read less