Best Japanese Literature Books

Here you will get Best Japanese Literature Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. No Longer Human

Author: by Osamu Dazai
New Directions
English
177 pages

View on Amazon

Nordic Tales is a collection of 16 traditional tales from the enchanting world of Nordic folklore. Translated and transcribed by folklorists in the 19th century, these stories are at once magical, hilarious, cozy, and chilling. Welcome to a world of mystical adventurewhere trolls haunt the snowy forests, terrifying monsters roam the open sea, a young woman journeys to the end of the world, and a boy proves he knows no fear.

Offers a fascinating view into Nordic culture The tales come alive alongside bold, contemporary art Part of the popular Tales series, featuring Tales of Japan, Celtic Tales, Tales of India, and Tales of East AfricaNordic Tales will enthrall fans of fairytales and captivate those interested in the rich history of Nordic culture.

Ulla Thynell’s glowing contemporary illustrations accompany each tale, conjuring dragons, princesses, and the northern lights. A visually gorgeous book that will be at home on the shelf or on the coffee table A perfect gift for fairy tale and folklore lovers, fans of Nordic culture, people of Nordic ancestry, collectors of illustrated classics, and bibliophiles looking for a comforting wintertime read Add it to the collection of books like D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths by Ingri d’Aulaire and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire, Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman, and Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton.


3. Musashi: An Epic Novel of the Samurai Era

Author: by Eiji Yoshikawa
156836427X
Kodansha International
English

View on Amazon

The classic samurai novel about the real exploits of the most famous swordsman. Miyamoto Musashi was the child of an era when Japan was emerging from decades of civil strife. Lured to the great Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 by the hope of becoming a samurai-without really knowing what it meant-he regains consciousness after the battle to find himself lying defeated, dazed and wounded among thousands of the dead and dying.

On his way home, he commits a rash act, becomes a fugitive and brings life in his own village to a standstill-until he is captured by a weaponless Zen monk. The lovely Otsu, seeing in Musashi her ideal of manliness, frees him from his tortuous punishment, but he is recaptured and imprisoned.

During three years of solitary confinement, he delves into the classics of Japan and China. When he is set free again, he rejects the position of samurai and for the next several years pursues his goal relentlessly, looking neither to left nor to right.

Ever so slowly it dawns on him that following the Way of the Sword is not simply a matter of finding a target for his brute strength. Continually striving to perfect his technique, which leads him to a unique style of fighting with two swords simultaneously, he travels far and wide, challenging fighters of many disciplines, taking nature to be his ultimate and severest teacher and undergoing the rigorous training of those who follow the Way.


4. Tales of Japan: Traditional Stories of Monsters and Magic (Book of Japanese Mythology, Folk Tales from Japan)

Author: by Chronicle Books
Chronicle Books
English
168 pages

View on Amazon

A goblin with no body and a monster with no face. A resourceful samurai and a faithful daughter. A spirit of the moon and a dragon king. This collection of 15 traditional Japanese folktales transports readers to a time of adventure and enchantment.

Drawn from the works of folklorists Lafcadio Hearn and Yei Theodora Ozaki, these tales are by turns terrifying, exhilarating, and poetic. Striking illustrations by contemporary Japanese artist Kotaro Chiba Special gift edition features an embossed, textured case with metallic gold ink, and a satin ribbon page marker Part of the popular Tales series, featuring Nordic Tales, Celtic Tales, Tales of India, and Tales of East AfricaFans of Ghostly Tales, and Japanese Notebooks will love this book.

This book is ideal for: Fans of fairytales, folklore, ghost stories, Greek mythology, roman mythology, Chinese mythology, and Celtic mythology Anyone interested in Japan’s history books and culture studies People of Japanese heritage Collectors of illustrated classics


5. The Setting Sun (New Directions Book)

Author: by Osamu Dazai
New Directions
English
175 pages

View on Amazon

This powerful novel of a nation in social and moral crisis was first published by New Directions in 1956. Set in the early postwar years, it probes the destructive effects of war and the transition from a feudal Japan to an industrial society.

Ozamu Dazai died, a suicide, in 1948. But the influence of his book has made “people of the setting sun” a permanent part of the Japanese language, and his heroine, Kazuko, a young aristocrat who deliberately abandons her class, a symbol of the anomie which pervades so much of the modern world.


6. Japanese Short Stories for Beginners: 20 Captivating Short Stories to Learn Japanese & Grow Your Vocabulary the Fun Way! (Easy Japanese Stories)

Author: by Lingo Mastery
English
221 pages
1951949226

View on Amazon

Do you know what the hardest thing for a Japanese learner is? Finding PROPER reading material that they can handlewhich is precisely the reason we’ve written this book! You may have found the best teacher in town or the most incredible learning app around, but if you don’t put all of that knowledge to practice, you’ll soon forget everything you’ve obtained.

This is why being engaged with interesting reading material can be so essential for somebody wishing to learn a new language. Therefore, in this book we have compiled 20 easy-to-read, compelling and fun stories that will allow you to expand your vocabulary and give you the tools to improve your grasp of the wonderful Japanese language.

How Japanese Short Stories for Beginners works:Each chapter possesses a funny, interesting and/or thought-provoking story based on real-life situations, allowing you to learn a bit more about the Japanese culture. Having trouble understanding Japanese characters? No problem we provide you with the English translation below each paragraph, allowing you to fully grasp what you’re reading!


7. Silence: A Novel (Picador Classics)

Author: by Shusaku Endo
Picador Modern Classics
English
256 pages

View on Amazon

Shusaku Endo’s New York Times bestselling classic novel of enduring faith in dangerous times, now a major motion picture directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Andrew Garfield, Liam Neeson, and Adam Driver “Silence I regard as a masterpiece, a lucid and elegant drama.”-The New York Review of BooksSeventeenth-century Japan: Two Portuguese Jesuit priests travel to a country hostile to their religion, where feudal lords force the faithful to publicly renounce their beliefs.

Eventually captured and forced to watch their Japanese Christian brothers lay down their lives for their faith, the priests bear witness to unimaginable cruelties that test their own beliefs. Shusaku Endo is one of the most celebrated and well-known Japanese fiction writers of the twentieth century, and Silence is widely considered to be his great masterpiece.


8. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World: A Novel (Vintage International)

Author: by Haruki Murakami
English
416 pages
0679743464

View on Amazon

Hyperkinetic and relentlessly inventive, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is Haruki Murakami’s deep dive into the very nature of consciousness. Across two parallel narratives, Murakami draws readers into a mind-bending universe in which Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, a split-brained data processor, a deranged scientist, his shockingly undemure granddaughter, and various thugs, librarians, and subterranean monsters collide to dazzling effect.

What emerges is a novel that is at once hilariously funny and a deeply serious meditation on the nature and uses of the mind.


9. Japanese Stories for Language Learners: Bilingual Stories in Japanese and English (MP3 Audio disc included)

Author: by Anne McNulty
Tuttle Publishing
English
192 pages

View on Amazon

A great story can lead a reader on a journey of discoveryespecially if it’s presented in two languages! Beautifully illustrated in a traditional style, Japanese Stories for Language Learners offers five compelling stories with English and Japanese language versions appearing on facing pages.

Taking learners on an exciting cultural and linguistic journey, each story is followed by detailed translator’s notes, Japanese vocabulary lists, and grammar points along with a set of discussion questions and exercises. The first two stories are very famous traditional Japanese folktales: Urashima Taro (Tale of a Fisherman) and Yuki Onna (The Snow Woman).

These are followed by three short stories by notable 20th century authors: Kumo no Ito (The Spider’s Thread) by Akutagawa Ryunosuke (1892-1927)Oborekaketa Kyodai (The Siblings Who Almost Drowned) by Arishima Takeo (1878-1923)Serohiki no Goshu (Gauche the Cellist) by Miyazawa Kenji (1896-1933)Reading these stories in the original Japanese scriptand hearing native-speakers read them aloud in the accompanying free audio recordinghelps students at every level deepen their comprehension of the beauty and subtlety of the Japanese language.

10. The Rising of the Shield Hero Volume 01

Author: by Aneko Yusagi
1935548727
English
300 pages

View on Amazon

Naofumi Iwatani, an uncharismatic Otaku who spends his days on games and manga, suddenly finds himself summoned to a parallel universe! He discovers he is one of four heroes equipped with legendary weapons and tasked with saving the world from its prophesied destruction.

As the Shield Hero, the weakest of the heroes, all is not as it seems. Naofumi is soon alone, penniless, and betrayed. With no one to turn to, and nowhere to run, he is left with only his shield. Now, Naofumi must rise to become the legendary Shield Hero and save the world!

11. The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea

Author: by Yukio Mishima
Vintage (May 31, 1994)
English
192 pages

View on Amazon

Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea explores the vicious nature of youth that is sometimes mistaken for innocence. Thirteen-year-old Noboru is a member of a gang of highly philosophical teenage boys who reject the tenets of the adult world to them, adult life is illusory, hypocritical, and sentimental.

When Noboru’s widowed mother is romanced by Ryuji, a sailor, Noboru is thrilled. He idolizes this rugged man of the sea as a hero. But his admiration soon turns to hatred, as Ryuji forsakes life onboard the ship for marriage, rejecting everything Noboru holds sacred.

Upset and appalled, he and his friends respond to this apparent betrayal with a terrible ferocity.

12. Kokoro

Author: by Natsume Soseki
0895267152
Gateway Editions
English

View on Amazon

“The subject of ‘Kokoro,’ which can be translated as ‘the heart of things’ or as ‘feeling,’ is the delicate matter of the contrast between the meanings the various parties of a relationship attach to it. In the course of this exploration, Soseki brilliantly describes different levels of friendship, family relationships, and the devices by which men attempt to escape from their fundamental loneliness.

The novel sustains throughout its length something approaching poetry, and it is rich in understanding and insight. The translation, by Edwin McClellan, is extremely good.”Anthony West, The New Yorker

13. The Sound of Waves

Author: by Yukio Mishima
Vintage
English
192 pages

View on Amazon

Set in a remote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. A young fisherman is entranced at the sight of the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village. They fall in love, but must then endure the calumny and gossip of the villagers.

14. The Tale of Genji: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Author: by Murasaki Shikibu
Penguin Classics
English
1216 pages

View on Amazon

The world’s first novel, in a translation that is likely to be the definitive edition … For many years to come (The Wall Street Journal)The inspiration behind The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated” – Now through June 16 at The Met Fifth Avenue A Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, with flaps and deckle-edged paper Written in the eleventh century, this exquisite portrait of courtly life in medieval Japan is widely celebrated as the world’s first novel.

Genji, the Shining Prince, is the son of an emperor. He is a passionate character whose tempestuous nature, family circumstances, love affairs, alliances, and shifting political fortunes form the core of this magnificent epic. Royall Tyler’s superior translation is detailed, poetic, and superbly true to the Japanese original while allowing the modern reader to appreciate it as a contemporary treasure.

Supplemented with detailed notes, glossaries, character lists, and chronologies to help the reader navigate the multigenerational narrative, this comprehensive edition presents this ancient tale in the grand style that it deserves.

15. Battle Royale: Remastered (Battle Royale (Novel))

Author: by Koushun Takami
1421565986
Haikasoru
English

View on Amazon

In a dystopian future Japan, forty-two junior high school students are outfitted with weapons and bid to kill one another until there is only one left standing. Koushun Takami’s notorious high-octane thriller envisions a nightmare scenario: a class of junior high school students is taken to a deserted island where, as part of a ruthless authoritarian program, they are provided arms and forced to kill until only one survivor is left standing.

Criticized as violent exploitation when rst published in Japanwhere it became a runaway best sellerBattle Royale is a Lord of the Flies for the 21st century, a potent allegory of what it means to be young and (barely) alive in a dog-eat-dog world.

16. Sword Art Online, Vol. 2: Aincrad

Author: by Reki Kawahara
Yen On
English
256 pages

View on Amazon

Linked up and logged into the deadly VMMORPG “Sword Art Online” in both the real and virtual worlds, Kirito is stuck in a hell of one man’s making, and like everyone else, unable to escape until the game is beaten.

But while some players are crippled by fear and others throw themselves into completing the game, still others relax into everyday life in the face of their cruel predicament and live to the best of their ability… Laughing, crying, but always enjoying the game.

Among them are four women who make a mark upon the solo adventurer that Kirito has become: Silica, the beast-tamer; Lisbeth, the blacksmith; Yui, the mysterious orphan; and the tragic Sachi, never to be forgotten by the black swordsman…