Best Peru History Books

Here you will get Best Peru History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Dirty Gold: The Rise and Fall of an International Smuggling Ring

Author: by Jay Weaver
Published at: PublicAffairs (March 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1541762909

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The explosive story of the illegal gold trade from South America, and the three Miami businessmen who got rich on ituntil it all came crashing down. In March of 2017, a team of federal agents arrested Juan Pablo Granda, Samer Barrage, and Renato Rodriguez, or as they came to be known, “the three amigos.” The triofirst identified publicly by the authors of this bookhad built a $3.

6 billion dollar business in metals trading, mostly illegal Peruvian gold mined in the rain forest. Their arrest and subsequent prosecution laid bare more than a scheme between a few corrupt traders. Dirty Gold lifts the veil on a massive and very illegal international business that is more lucrative than trafficking cocaine, and often just as dangerous.

As this award-winning team of current and former Miami Herald reporters shows, illegal gold mines have become a haven for Latin American drug money. The gold is sold to metals traders, and ultimately to scores of unwitting Americans in their jewelry and phones.


2. Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor (California Series in Public Anthropology) (Volume 4)

Author: by Paul Farmer
Published at: University of California Press; 1st edition (November 1, 2004)
ISBN: 978-0520243262

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Pathologies of Power uses harrowing stories of illness, of lifeand deathin extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience studying diseases in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world’s poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times.

A thoughtful memoir with passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other.

Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are mirrored in pathology, plague, disease and death.


3. Bolivar: American Liberator

Author: by Marie Arana
Published at: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (April 8, 2014)
ISBN: 978-1439110201

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A brilliant biography that reads like a wonderful novel but is researched like a masterwork of history (Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs), this is the epic story of the famous South American general and statesman Simn Bolvar. SIMN BOL VAR El Libertadorfreed six countries from Spanish rule and is still the most revered figure in South America today.

He traveled from Amazon jungles to the Andes mountains, engaged in endless battles and forged fragile coalitions of competing forces and races. He lived an epic life filled with heroism, tragedy (his only wife died young), and legend (he was saved from an assassination attempt by one of his mistresses).

In Bolvar, Marie Arana has written a sweeping biography that is as bold and as passionate as its subject. Drawing on a wealth of primary documents, Arana vividly captures the early nineteenth-century South America that made Bolvar the man he became: fearless general, brilliant strategist, consummate diplomat, dedicated abolitionist, gifted writer, and flawed politician.


4. Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time

Author: by Mark Adams
Published at: Dutton; Illustrated edition (April 24, 2012)
ISBN: 978-0452297982

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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING TRAVEL MEMOIRWhat happens when an unadventurous adventure writer tries to re-create the original expedition to Machu Picchu? In 1911, Hiram Bingham III climbed into the Andes Mountains of Peru and discovered Machu Picchu. While history has recast Bingham as a villain who stole both priceless artifacts and credit for finding the great archeological site, Mark Adams set out to retrace the explorer’s perilous path in search of the truthexcept he’d written about adventure far more than he’d actually lived it.

In fact, he’d never even slept in a tent. Turn Right at Machu Picchu is Adams’ fascinating and funny account of his journey through some of the world’s most majestic, historic, and remote landscapes guided only by a hard-as-nails Australian survivalist and one nagging question: Just what was Machu Picchu?


5. Forgotten Continent: A History of the New Latin America

Author: by Michael Reid
Published at: Yale University Press; New edition (November 14, 2017)
ISBN: 978-0300224658

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A newly updated edition of the best-selling primer on the social, political, and economic challenges facing Central and South America Ten years after its first publication, Michael Reid’s best-selling survey of the state of contemporary Latin America has been wholly updated to reflect the new realities of the Forgotten Continent.

The former Americas editor for the Economist, Reid suggests that much of Central and South America, though less poor, less unequal, and better educated than before, faces harder economic times now that the commodities boom of the 2000s is over.

His revised, in-depth account of the region reveals dynamic societies more concerned about corruption and climate change, the uncertainties of a Donald Trump-led United States, and a political cycle that, in many cases, is turning from left-wing populism to center-right governments.

This essential new edition provides important insights into the sweeping changes that have occurred in Latin America in recent years and indicates priorities for the future.

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The Last Days of the Incas

Author: by Kim MacQuarrie
Published at: Simon & Schuster; Illustrated edition (June 5, 2008)
ISBN: 978-0743260503

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The epic story of the fall of the Inca Empire to Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, Vilcabamba, by three American explorers.

In 1532, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, including his four brothers, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the Spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar.

Pizarro and his men soon clashed with Atahualpa and a huge force of Inca warriors at the Battle of Cajamarca. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, the Spaniards prevaileddue largely to their horses, their steel armor and swords, and their tactic of surprise.

They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Although the Inca emperor paid an enormous ransom in gold, the Spaniards executed him anyway. The following year, the Spaniards seized the Inca capital of Cuzco, completing their conquest of the largest native empire the New World has ever known.


7. Bolívar: Libertador de América / Bolivar: American Liberator (Biografías y Memorias) (Spanish Edition)

Author: by Marie Arana
Published at: Debate; 001 edition (May 19, 2020)
ISBN: 978-8417636456

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Un relato biogrfico vibrante que captura la pica historia de Simn Bolvar, El Libertador. Simn Bolvar se gan el sobrenombre de El Libertador tras poner fin al dominio espaol sobre seis pases. Su vida fue heroica, trgica y legendaria: viaj del Amazonas a los Andes, libr eternas batallas, forj alianzas entre razas rivales…

Partiendo de un gran abanico de fuentes, Marie Arana captura un vvido retrato de la Suramrica de inicios del siglo XIX, la que forj a Bolvar y lo convirti en un valeroso general, un estratega brillante, un escritor portentoso y un poltico sin parangn; en definitiva, uno de los personajes ms admirados de Latinoamrica.

Bolvar es una biografa trepidante en la que el lector hallar la imagen de una vida trgica capturada en todo su esplendor y un conmovedor manifiesto de la verdadera esencia del pueblo latinoamericano. ENGLISH DESCRIPTIONA sweeping narrative worthy of a Hollywood epic, this is the authoritative biography of the warrior-statesman who was the greatest figure in Latin American history.


8. The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Essential Histories Series)

Author: by Marshall C. Eakin
Published at: St. Martin's Griffin; First edition (June 12, 2007)
ISBN: 978-1403980816

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This narrative history of Latin America surveys five centuries in less than five hundred pages. The first third of the book moves from the Americas before Columbus to the wars for independence in the early nineteenth century. The construction of new nations and peoples in the nineteenth century forms the middle third, and the final section analyzes economic development, rising political participation, and the search of identity over the last century.

The collision of peoples and cultures-Native Americans, Europeans, Africans-that defines Latin America, and gives it both its unity and diversity, provides the central theme of this concise, synthetic history.


9. DK Eyewitness Peru (Travel Guide)

Author: by DK Eyewitness
Published at: DK Eyewitness Travel; Illustrated edition (May 21, 2019)
ISBN: 978-0241368800

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Peru is bursting with bucket-list experiences. Whether you want to hike the incredible Andes, spot dolphins on a cruise down the Amazon river or simply relax in a secluded coastal paradise, your DK Eyewitness travel guide makes sure you experience all that Peru has to offer.

Peru is overflowing with natural riches: untamed jungle, scorched coastal desert, snow-frosted peaks and an amazing array of wildlife. Treasures of the Inca Empire can be found scattered across this landscape and ancient beliefs are still celebrated at joyous traditional festivals.

Our regularly updated guide brings Peru to life, transporting you there like no other travel guide does with expert-led insights and advice, detailed information on all the must-see sights, inspiring photography, and our trademark illustrations. You’ll discover: our pick of Peru’s must-sees, top experiences, and hidden gems- the best spots to eat, drink, shop and stay – detailed maps and walks which make navigating the country easy- easy-to-follow itineraries- expert advice: get ready, get around and stay safe- color-coded chapters to every part of Peru, from the Southern Coast to the Northern Desert, Lima to Cusco and the Sacred Valley- our new lightweight format, so you can take it with you wherever you goTravelling around South America?

10. Conquistador Voices: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas as Recounted Largely by the Participants

Author: by Kevin H Siepel
Published at: Spruce Tree Press; 1st edition (October 12, 2015)
ISBN: 978-0978646639

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The Spanish Conquest: What Really Happened? If you’re a person who likes to learn the messy details of events likely sanitized in your schoolbooks, Conquistador Voices may be for you. You’re likely to find this book not only informative but easy to read, because Conquistador Voices is built around first-person narrativesthe kind of thing that usually holds our attention.

Think of it as a film documentary in written form, one that tells an important story in 500-year-old sound bites and narrative, and that does so in a way that informs without moralizing. In this two-volume set you’ll find neither a defense of the conquistadors nor a politically correct polemic against them.

What you will find is a one-stop, five-part layman’s summary of the Conquest, one that delves dispassionately into persons and events we still talk about today. To see who’s covered in each volume, click on the volume’s cover image and then Look Inside.

If you like what you see, order a copy for yourself or other history buff today.

11. Mother of God: An Extraordinary Journey into the Uncharted Tributaries of the Western Amazon

Author: by Paul Rosolie
Published at: Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (March 17, 2015)
ISBN: 978-0062259523

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For fans of The Lost City of Z, Walking the Amazon, and Turn Right at Machu Picchu comes naturalist and explorer Paul Rosolie’s extraordinary adventure in the uncharted tributaries of the Western Amazona tale of discovery that vividly captures the awe, beauty, and isolation of this endangered land and presents an impassioned call to save it.

In the Madre de DiosMother of Godregion of Peru, where the Amazon River begins its massive flow, the Andean Mountain cloud forests fall into lowland Amazon Rainforest, creating the most biodiversity-rich place on the planet. In January 2006, when he was just a restless eighteen-year-old hungry for adventure, Paul Rosolie embarked on a journey to the west Amazon that would transform his life.

Venturing alone into some of the most inaccessible reaches of the jungle, he encountered giant snakes, floating forests, isolated tribes untouched by outsiders, prowling jaguars, orphaned baby anteaters, poachers in the black market trade in endangered species, and much more.

12. Witness to the Age of Revolution: The Odyssey of Juan Bautista Tupac Amaru (Graphic History Series)

Author: by Charles F. Walker
Published at: Oxford University Press (September 1, 2020)

ISBN: 978-0190941154

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The Tupac Amaru rebellion of 1780-1783 began as a local revolt against colonial authorities and grew into the largest rebellion in the history of Spain’s American empire-more widespread and deadlier than the American Revolution. An official collector of tribute for the imperial crown, Jos Gabriel Condorcanqui had seen firsthand what oppressive Spanish rule meant for Peru’s Indian population and, under the Inca royal name Tupac Amaru, he set events in motion that would transform him into one of Latin America’s most iconic revolutionary figures.

While he and the rebellion’s leaders were put to death, his half-brother, Juan Bautista Tupac Amaru, survived but paid a high price for his participation in the uprising. This work in the Graphic History series is based on the memoir written by Juan Bautista about his odyssey as a prisoner of Spain.

He endured forty years in jails, dungeons, and presidios on both sides of the Atlantic. Juan Bautista spent two years in jail in Cusco, was freed, rearrested, and then marched 700 miles in chains over the Andes to Lima. He spent two years aboard a ship travelling around Cape Horn to Spain.

13. Pigmentocracies: Ethnicity, Race, and Color in Latin America

Author: by Edward Telles
Published at: University of North Carolina Press; 1St Edition (October 22, 2014)
ISBN: 978-1469617831

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Pigmentocracies-the fruit of the multiyear Project on Ethnicity and Race in Latin America (PERLA)-is a richly revealing analysis of contemporary attitudes toward ethnicity and race in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru, four of Latin America’s most populous nations. Based on extensive, original sociological and anthropological data generated by PERLA, this landmark study analyzes ethnoracial classification, inequality, and discrimination, as well as public opinion about Afro-descended and indigenous social movements and policies that foster greater social inclusiveness, all set within an ethnoracial history of each country.

A once-in-a-generation examination of contemporary ethnicity, this book promises to contribute in significant ways to policymaking and public opinion in Latin America. Edward Telles, PERLA’s principal investigator, explains that profound historical and political forces, including multiculturalism, have helped to shape the formation of ethnic identities and the nature of social relations within and across nations.

14. God in the Rainforest: A Tale of Martyrdom and Redemption in Amazonian Ecuador

Author: by Kathryn T. Long

Published at: Oxford University Press; Illustrated edition (February 26, 2019)
ISBN: 978-0190608989

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In January of 1956, five young evangelical missionaries were speared to death by a band of the Waorani people in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Two years later, two missionary women-the widow of one of the slain men and the sister of another-with the help of a Wao woman were able to establish peaceful relations with the same people who had killed their loved ones.

The highly publicized deaths of the five men and the subsequent efforts to Christianize the Waorani quickly became the defining missionary narrative for American evangelicals during the second half of the twentieth century. God in the Rainforest traces the formation of this story and shows how Protestant missionary work among the Waorani came to be one of the missions most celebrated by Evangelicals and most severely criticized by anthropologists and others who accused missionaries of destroying the indigenous culture.Kathryn T.

Long offers a study of the complexities of world Christianity at the ground level for indigenous peoples and for missionaries, anthropologists, environmentalists, and other outsiders. For the first time, Long brings together these competing actors and agendas to reveal one example of an indigenous people caught in the cross-hairs of globalization.

15. Silver, Sword, and Stone: Three Crucibles in the Latin American Story

Author: by Marie Arana
Published at: Simon & Schuster (August 27, 2019)
ISBN: 978-1501104244

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Winner, American Library Association Booklist’s Top of the List, 2019 Adult Nonfiction Longlisted for the 2020 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence Against the background of a thousand years of vivid history, acclaimed writer Marie Arana tells the timely and timeless stories of three contemporary Latin Americans whose lives represent three driving forces that have shaped the character of the region: exploitation (silver), violence (sword), and religion (stone).

Leonor Gonzales lives in a tiny community perched 18,000 feet above sea level in the Andean cordillera of Peru, the highest human habitation on earth. Like her late husband, she works the gold mines much as the Indians were forced to do at the time of the Spanish Conquest.

Illiteracy, malnutrition, and disease reign as they did five hundred years ago. And now, just as then, a miner’s survival depends on a vast global market whose fluctuations are controlled in faraway places. Carlos Buergos is a Cuban who fought in the civil war in Angola and now lives in a quiet community outside New Orleans.

16. Conquest of Peru

Author: by

Richard Bentley

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