Best Philosophy Criticism Books

Here you will get Best Philosophy Criticism Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. As a man Thinketh: The Original 1902 Edition (The Wisdom Of James Allen)

Author: by James Allen
B08W7DWHSS
English
90 pages

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All that we achieve and all that we fail to achieve is the direct result of our own thoughts. Self-control is strength. Right thought is mastery.Calmness is power. James Allen, As a Man Thinketh”As a Man Thinketh” is a literary essay by James Allen, first published in 1902.

In more than a century it has become an inspirational classic, selling millions of copies worldwide and bringing faith, inspiration, and self healing to all who have encountered it. The title comes from the Bible: “As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he.” – Proverbs, chapter 23, verse 7.

As himself Allen describes, It shows how, in his own thought-world, each man holds the key to every condition, good or bad, that enters into his life, and that, by working patiently and intelligently upon his thoughts, he may remake his life, and transform his circumstances.

And it can be carried in the pocket. Too many mortals strive to improve only their wordly position-and too few seek spiritual betterment. Such is the problem James Allen faced in his own time. The ideas he found in his inner-most heart after great searching guided him as they will guide you.


2. The Philosophy Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained

Author: by Will Buckingham
B00TK7U4A0
DK (March 2, 2015)
March 2, 2015

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What existed before the Universe was created? Where does self-worth come from? Do the ends always justify the means? The Philosophy Book answers the most profound questions we all have. It is your visual guide to the fundamental nature of existence, society, and how we think.

Discover what it means to be free, whether science can predict the future, or how language shapes our thoughts. Learn about the world’s greatest philosophers, from Plato and Confucius to modern thinkers such as Chomsky and Derrida and follow charts and timelines that graphically show the progression of ideas and logic.

Written in plain English, with concise explanations of branches of philosophy such as metaphysics and ethics, it untangles complicated theories and makes sense of abstract concepts. It is an ideal reference whether you’re a student or a general reader, with simple explanations of big ideas, including the four noble truths, the soul, class struggle, moral purpose, and good and evil.


3. Beyond Good and Evil

Author: by Friedrich Nietzsche
1503250881
English
116 pages

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Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future is a book by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1886. It draws on and expands the ideas of his previous work, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, but with a more critical and polemical approach.

In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche accuses past philosophers of lacking critical sense and blindly accepting dogmatic premises in their consideration of morality. Specifically, he accuses them of founding grand metaphysical systems upon the faith that the good man is the opposite of the evil man, rather than just a different expression of the same basic impulses that find more direct expression in the evil man.

The work moves into the realm “beyond good and evil” in the sense of leaving behind the traditional morality which Nietzsche subjects to a destructive critique in favour of what he regards as an affirmative approach that fearlessly confronts the perspectival nature of knowledge and the perilous condition of the modern individual.


4. Beyond Good & Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future

Author: by Friedrich Nietzsche
English
288 pages
0679724656

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Represents Nietzsche’s attempt to sum up his philosophy. In nine parts the book is designed to give the reader a comprehensive idea of Nietzsche’s thought and style: they span “The Prejudices of Philsophers,” “The Free Spirit,” religion, morals, scholarship, “Our Virtues,” “Peoples and Fatherlands,” and “What Is Noble,” as well as epigrams and a concluding poem.

Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most remarkable and influential books of the nineteenth century. This translation by Walter Kaufmann has become the standard one, for accuracy and fidelity to the eccentricities and grace of the style of the original.

The translation is based on the only edition Nietzsche himself published, and all variant reading in later editions. This volume offers an inclusive index of subjects and persons, as well as a running footnote commentary on the text.


5. Critical Thinking In A Nutshell: How To Become An Independent Thinker And Make Intelligent Decisions (Critical Thinking & Logic Mastery)

Author: by Thinknetic
B091NLDBN4
English
132 pages

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Did you know that 93% of CEOs agree that THIS skill is MORE IMPORTANT than your college degree? Amazon’s market cap is 1.7 TRILLION dollars. And it all started when Jeff Bezos used this skill to see a market inefficiency back in the day, before anyone else.

During the 1980s “Coke Wars,” Coca-Cola and Pepsi went back and forth competing to be America’s top soda. But Coca-Cola didn’t use this skill at the right time… And their mistake almost completely blew up one of America’s oldest and most valuable companies.

Having this skill in your back pocket is like shortcutting Malcom Gladwell’s 10,000 hours rule to learning something (who’s got time for that?.So, what is it? Nothing complex or fancy. But it’s the skill Supreme Court justices have in spades (they’re the highest legal authority in our country because they can do this thing).

It’s critical thinking. Critical thinking is one of those skills everyone “thinks” that they already haveBut most people are anxious, unhappy, doubt their decisions, and aren’t where they want to be in life. Sometimes, basic skills aren’t so basic. But it’s not your fault.


6. Being and Nothingness

Author: by Jean-Paul Sartre
Washington Square Press
English
864 pages

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A philosophical classic and major cornerstone of modern existentialism Often criticized and all-too-rarely understood, the philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre encompasses the dilemmas and aspirations of the individual in contemporary society. “Being and Nothingness “contains all the basic tenets of his thought, as well as all its more intricate details.

A work of inherent force and epic scope, it provides a vivid analysis for all who would understand one of the most influential philosophic movements of any age, and makes clear why “The New York Times “hailed Sartre’s masterpiece as “a philosophy to be reckoned with, both for its own intrinsic power and as a profound symptom of our time.”


7. The Conspiracy against the Human Race: A Contrivance of Horror

Author: by Thomas Ligotti
Penguin Books
English
272 pages

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In Thomas Ligotti’s first nonfiction outing, an examination of the meaning (or meaninglessness) of life through an insightful, unsparing argument that proves the greatest horrors are not the products of our imagination but instead are found in reality.”There is a signature motif discernible in both works of philosophical pessimism and supernatural horror.

It may be stated thus: Behind the scenes of life lurks something pernicious that makes a nightmare of our world.”His fiction is known to be some of the most terrifying in the genre of supernatural horror, but Thomas Ligotti’s first nonfiction book may be even scarier.

Drawing on philosophy, literature, neuroscience, and other fields of study, Ligotti takes the penetrating lens of his imagination and turns it on his audience, causing them to grapple with the brutal reality that they are living a meaningless nightmare, and anyone who feels otherwise is simply acting out an optimistic fallacy.

At once a guidebook to pessimistic thought and a relentless critique of humanity’s employment of self-deception to cope with the pervasive suffering of their existence, The Conspiracy against the Human Race may just convince readers that there is more than a measure of truth in the despairing yet unexpectedly liberating negativity that is widely considered a hallmark of Ligotti’s work.


8. The God Delusion

Author: by Richard Dawkins
B003JTHWJQ
Mariner Books
January 16, 2008

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A preeminent scientistand the world’s most prominent atheistasserts the irrationality of belief in God and the grievous harm religion has inflicted on society, from the Crusades to 9/11. With rigor and wit, Dawkins examines God in all his forms, from the sex-obsessed tyrant of the Old Testament to the more benign (but still illogical) Celestial Watchmaker favored by some Enlightenment thinkers.

He eviscerates the major arguments for religion and demonstrates the supreme improbability of a supreme being. He shows how religion fuels war, foments bigotry, and abuses children, buttressing his points with historical and contemporary evidence. The God Delusion makes a compelling case that belief in God is not just wrong but potentially deadly.

It also offers exhilarating insight into the advantages of atheism to the individual and society, not the least of which is a clearer, truer appreciation of the universe’s wonders than any faith could ever muster.


9. The Argonauts

Author: by Maggie Nelson

Graywolf Press
English
160 pages

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An intrepid voyage out to the frontiers of the latest thinking about love, language, and family Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of “autotheory” offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language.

It binds an account of Nelson’s relationship with her partner and a journey to and through a pregnancy to a rigorous exploration of sexuality, gender, and “family.” An insistence on radical individual freedom and the value of caretaking becomes the rallying cry for this thoughtful, unabashed, uncompromising book.

10. Everybody: A Book about Freedom

Author: by Olivia Laing
English
368 pages
0393608778

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“Astute and consistently surprising critic” (NPR) Olivia Laing investigates the body and its discontents through the great freedom movements of the twentieth century. The body is a source of pleasure and of pain, at once hopelessly vulnerable and radiant with power.

In her ambitious, brilliant sixth book, Olivia Laing charts an electrifying course through the long struggle for bodily freedom, using the life of the renegade psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich to explore gay rights and sexual liberation, feminism, and the civil rights movement.

Drawing on her own experiences in protest and alternative medicine, and traveling from Weimar Berlin to the prisons of McCarthy-era America, Laing grapples with some of the most significant and complicated figures of the past centuryamong them Nina Simone, Christopher Isherwood, Andrea Dworkin, Sigmund Freud, Susan Sontag, and Malcolm X.

Despite its many burdens, the body remains a source of power, even in an era as technologized and automated as our own. Arriving at a moment in which basic bodily rights are once again imperiled, Everybody is an investigation into the forces arranged against freedom and a celebration of how ordinary human bodies can resist oppression and reshape the world.1 illustration

11. Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory

Author: by Patricia Hill Collins
English
376 pages
1478006463

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In Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory Patricia Hill Collins offers a set of analytical tools for those wishing to develop intersectionality’s capability to theorize social inequality in ways that would facilitate social change. While intersectionality helps shed light on contemporary social issues, Collins notes that it has yet to reach its full potential as a critical social theory.

She contends that for intersectionality to fully realize its power, its practitioners must critically reflect on its assumptions, epistemologies, and methods. She places intersectionality in dialog with several theoretical traditionsfrom the Frankfurt school to black feminist thoughtto sharpen its definition and foreground its singular critical purchase, thereby providing a capacious interrogation into intersectionality’s potential to reshape the world.

12. Michel de Montaigne – The Complete Essays (Penguin Classics)

Author: by Michel de Montaigne
0140446044
Penguin Classics
English

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Michel de Montaigne was one of the most influential figures of the Renaissance, singlehandedly responsible for popularising the essay as a literary form. This Penguin Classics edition of The Complete Essays is translated from the French and edited with an introduction and notes by M.A.Screech.

In 1572 Montaigne retired to his estates in order to devote himself to leisure, reading and reflection. There he wrote his constantly expanding ‘assays’, inspired by the ideas he found in books contained in his library and from his own experience.

He discusses subjects as diverse as war-horses and cannibals, poetry and politics, sex and religion, love and friendship, ecstasy and experience. But, above all, Montaigne studied himself as a way of drawing out his own inner nature and that of men and women in general.

The Essays are among the most idiosyncratic and personal works in all literature and provide an engaging insight into a wise Renaissance mind, continuing to give pleasure and enlightenment to modern readers. With its extensive introduction and notes, M.A.

13. Desire/Love

Author: by Lauren Berlant
English
142 pages
0615686877

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There is nothing more alienating than having your pleasures disputed by someone with a theory, writes Lauren Berlant. Yet the ways in which we live sexuality and intimacy have been profoundly shaped by theories especially psychoanalytic ones, which have helped to place sexuality and desire at the center of the modern story about what a person is and how her history should be read.

At the same time, other modes of explanation have been offered by popular and mass culture. In these domains, sexual desire is not deemed the core story of life; it is mixed up with romance, a particular version of the story of love.

In this small theoretical novella-cum-dictionary entry, Lauren Berlant engages love and desire in separate entries. In the first entry, Desire mainly describes the feeling one person has for something else: it is organized by psychoanalytic accounts of attachment, and tells briefly the history of their importance in critical theory and practice.

The second entry, on Love, begins with an excursion into fantasy, moving away from the parent-child structure so central to psychoanalysis and looking instead at the centrality of context, environment, and history. The entry on Love describes some workings of romance across personal life and commodity culture, the place where subjects start to think about fantasy on behalf of their actual lives.

14. Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (Modern Library (Hardcover))

Author: by Friedrich Nietzsche
0679601759
Modern Library
English

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Friedrich Nietzsche’s most accessible and influential philosophical work, misquoted, misrepresented, brilliantly original and enormously influential, Thus Spoke Zarathustra is translated from the German by R.J. Hollingdale in Penguin Classics. Nietzsche was one of the most revolutionary and subversive thinkers in Western philosophy, and Thus Spoke Zarathustra remains his most famous and influential work.

It describes how the ancient Persian prophet Zarathustra descends from his solitude in the mountains to tell the world that God is dead and that the Superman, the human embodiment of divinity, is his successor. Nietzsche’s utterance ‘God is dead’, his insistence that the meaning of life is to be found in purely human terms, and his doctrine of the Superman and the will to power were all later seized upon and unrecognisably twisted by, among others, Nazi intellectuals.

With blazing intensity and poetic brilliance, Nietzsche argues that the meaning of existence is not to be found in religious pieties or meek submission to authority, but in an all-powerful life force: passionate, chaotic and free. Frederich Nietzsche (1844-1900) became the chair of classical philology at Basel University at the age of 24 until his bad health forced him to retire in 1879.

15. Glitch Feminism: A Manifesto

Author: by Legacy Russell
Verso (September 29, 2020)
English
192 pages

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A New York Times Best Art Book of 2020A new manifesto for cyberfeminismThe divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. How do we find out who we are within this digital era?

Where do we create the space to explore our identity? How can we come together and create solidarity? The glitch is often dismissed as an error, a faulty overlaying, but, as Legacy Russell shows, liberation can be found within the fissures between gender, technology and the body that it creates.

The glitch offers the opportunity for us to perform and transform ourselves in an infinite variety of identities. In Glitch Feminism, Russell makes a series of radical demands through memoir, art and critical theory, and the work of contemporary artists who have travelled through the glitch in their work.

Timely and provocative, Glitch Feminism shows how the error can be a revolution.

16. Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography

Author: by Roland Barthes
HILL & WANG
English
144 pages

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A graceful, contemplative volume, Camera Lucida was first published in 1979. Commenting on artists such as Avedon, Clifford, Mapplethorpe, and Nadar, Roland Barthes presents photography as being outside the codes of language or culture, acting on the body as much as on the mind, and rendering death and loss more acutely than any other medium.

This groundbreaking approach established Camera Lucida as one of the most important books of theory on the subject, along with Susan Sontag’s On Photography.