Best Ship History Books

Here you will get Best Ship History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Lost Boys of Montauk: The True Story of the Wind Blown, Four Men Who Vanished at Sea, and the Survivors They Left Behind

Author: by Amanda M. Fairbanks
English
336 pages
198210323X

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Experience one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age: The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton’s 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole. In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the Endurance and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot.

In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day’s sail short of its destination, the Endurance became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men.

When their ship was finally crushed between two ice floes, they attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic’s heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization. In Endurance, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton’s fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.


3. Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania

Author: by Erik Larson
B00PI0P0RA
March 12, 2015
English

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1st May 1915: the luxury ocean liner Lusitania sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool. Her passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone and its submarines were bringing terror to the Atlantic.

But the Lusitania’s captain, William Thomas Turner, had faith in the gentlemanly terms of warfare that had, for a century, kept civilian ships safe from attack. He also knew that his ship was the fastest then in service and could outrun any threat.

Germany was, however, intent on changing the rules, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot-20, was happy to oblige. For this would be the ill-fated Lusitania’s final crossing …


4. Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"

Author: by Zora Neale Hurston
Amistad
English
256 pages

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New York Times Bestseller TIME Magazine’s Best Nonfiction Book of 2018 New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018 NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018 Economist Book of the Year SELF. Com’s Best Books of 2018 Audible’s Best of the Year BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018 The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018 The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018 A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.

New York TimesOne of the greatest writers of our time. Toni MorrisonZora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a Maestrapiece. Alice WalkerA major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave tradeabducted from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the United States.

5


In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex

Author: by Nathaniel Philbrick
Penguin Books
English
320 pages

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From the author of Mayflower, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane’s Eye-the riveting bestseller tells the story of the true events that inspired Melville’s Moby-Dick. Winner of the National Book Award, Nathaniel Philbrick’s book is a fantastic saga of survival and adventure, steeped in the lore of whaling, with deep resonance in American literature and history.

In 1820, the whaleship Essex was rammed and sunk by an angry sperm whale, leaving the desperate crew to drift for more than ninety days in three tiny boats. Nathaniel Philbrick uses little-known documents and vivid details about the Nantucket whaling tradition to reveal the chilling facts of this infamous maritime disaster.

In the Heart of the Sea, recently adapted into a major feature film starring Chris Hemsworth, is a book for the ages.


6. Night to Remember (Holt Paperback)

Author: by WALTER LORD
Griffin
English

182 pages

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The classic minute-by-minute account of the sinking of the Titanic, in a 50th anniversary edition with a new introduction by Nathaniel Philbrick First published in 1955, A Night to Remember remains a completely riveting account of the Titanic’s fatal collision and the behavior of the passengers and crew, both noble and ignominious.

Some sacrificed their lives, while others fought like animals for their own survival. Wives beseeched husbands to join them in lifeboats; gentlemen went taut-lipped to their deaths in full evening dress; and hundreds of steerage passengers, trapped below decks, sought help in vain.

Available for the first time in trade paperback and with a new introduction for the 50th anniversary edition by Nathaniel Phil-brick, author of In the Heart of the Sea and Sea of Glory, Walter Lord’s classic minute-by-minute re-creation is as vivid now as it was upon first publication fifty years ago.

From the initial distress flares to the struggles of those left adrift for hours in freezing waters, this semicentennial edition brings that moonlit night in 1912 to life for a new generation of readers.


7. The Finest Hours: The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue

Author: by Michael J. Tougias
B0028S3WIY
Scribner
May 7, 2009

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The story behind the major motion picture from Disneystarring Chris Pine, Eric Bana, and Casey Affleckwritten by a recognized master of the genrea blockbuster account of tragedy at sea (The Providence Journal). It’s the winter of 1952 and a ferocious Nor’easter is pounding New England with howling winds and seventy-foot seas.

Two oil tankers get caught in the violent storm off Cape Cod, its fury splitting the massive ships in two. Back on shore are four young Coast Guardsmen who are given a suicide mission. They must save the lives of the seamen left stranded in the killer storm, and they have to do it in a tiny lifeboat.

The crew is led by Bernie Webber, who has to rely on prayer and the courage of his three crewmembers to pull off the impossible. As Webber and his crew sail into the teeth of the storm, each man comes to the realization that he may not come back alive.

They’ve lost all navigation and have no idea where the stranded seaman are, and have no idea how to get back home. Whether by sheer luck or divine intervention, the crew stumbles upon the wounded ship in the darkness. More than thirty men appear at the railings of the SS Pendleton, all hoping to be saved.


8. In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette

Author: by Hampton Sides
Anchor
English
480 pages

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A Best Book of the Year USA Today * Time Magazine * Washington Post * Miami Herald * Richmond Times Dispatch * Christian Science Monitor * Daily Beast * Minneapolis Star Tribune On July 8, 1879, Captain George Washington De Long and his team of thirty-two men set sail from San Francisco on the USS Jeanette.

Heading deep into uncharted Arctic waters, they carried the aspirations of a young country burning to be the first nation to reach the North Pole. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the Jeannette’s hull was breached by an impassable stretch of pack ice, forcing the crew to abandon ship amid torrents of rushing of water.

Hours later, the ship had sunk below the surface, marooning the men a thousand miles north of Siberia, where they faced a terrifying march with minimal supplies across the endless ice pack. Enduring everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and labyrinths of ice, the crew battled madness and starvation as they struggled desperately to survive.


9. The Modern Cruiser: The Evolution of the Ships that Fought the Second World War

Author: by Robert C. Stern
B08NCXVXLL
March 30, 2020
English

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An entertaining and informative review of the evolution of one of the most important classes of warship, from the technology of WWII into the missile age. FiretrenchCruisers probably vary more in their characteristics than any other warship type and have certainly been subject to the most convoluted development.

There was always a basic tension between quantity and quality, between numbers and unit size, but at a more detailed level every one of the naval powers made different demands of their cruiser designers. This makes the story of cruiser evolution in the world’s major navies fascinating but complex.

This book sets out to provide a coherent history of the fortunes of this ship-type in the twentieth century, beginning with a brief summary of development before the First World War and an account of a few notable cruiser actions during that conflict that helped define what cruisers would look like in the post-war world.

The core of the book is devoted to the impact of the naval disarmament treaty process, which concentrated to a great extent on attempting to define limits to the numbers and size of cruisers that could be built, in the process creating the treaty cruiser as a type that had never existed before and that existed solely because of the treaty process.

10. The Last Voyage of the Andrea Doria: The Sinking of the World's Most Glamorous Ship

Author: by Greg King
B07S9MJ8RS
April 7, 2020
English

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In the tradition of Erik Larson’s Dead Wake comes The Last Voyage of the Andrea Doria, about the sinking of the glamorous Italian ocean liner, including never-before-seen photos of the wreck today. In 1956, a stunned world watched as the famous Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria sank after being struck by a Swedish vessel off the coast of Nantucket.

Unlike the tragedy of the Titanic, this sinking played out in real time across radios and televisions, the first disaster of the modern age. Audiences witnessed everything that ensued after the unthinkable collision of two modern vessels equipped with radar: perilous hours of uncertainty; the heroic rescue of passengers; and the final gasp as the pride of the Italian fleet slipped beneath the Atlantic, taking some fifty lives with her.

Her loss signaled the end of the golden age of ocean liner travel. Now, Greg King and Penny Wilson offer a fresh look at this legendary liner and her tragic fate. Andrea Doria represented the romance of travel, the possibility of new lives in the new world, and the glamour of 1950s art, culture, and life.

11. Keep the Lights Burning, Abbie (Carolrhoda on My Own Books)

Author: by Peter Roop
First Avenue Editions ™
English
40 pages

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Abbie was afraid.She had never had to keep the lights burning by herself. But many lives depended on the lighthouse, and Papa was depending on Abbie. This is the exciting true story of Abbie Burgess, who in 1856 single-handedly kept the lighthouse lamps lit during a tremendous storm off the coast of Maine.

“The Roops have done an excellent job of putting a fascinating tale into simple language…. Hanson’s lovely watercolors evoke the mood and are far and away superior to what appears in many easy-to-reads.”starred, Booklist

12. Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea: The History and Discovery of the World's Richest Shipwreck

Author: by Gary Kinder
B008V43RXE
Grove Press
October 20, 2009

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Titanic meets Tom Clancy technology in this national-bestselling account of the SS Central America’s wreckage and discovery (People).September 1875. With nearly six hundred passengers returning from the California Gold Rush, the side-wheel steamer SS Central America encountered a violent storm and sank two hundred miles off the Carolina coast.

More than four hundred lives and twenty-one tons of gold were lost. It was a tragedy lost in legend for more than a centuryuntil a brilliant young engineer named Tommy Thompson set out to find the wreck. Driven by scientific curiosity and resentful of the term treasure hunt, Thompson searched the deep-ocean floor using historical accounts, cutting-edge sonar technology, and an underwater robot of his own design.

Navigating greedy investors, impatient crewmembers, and a competing salvage team, Thompson finally located the wreck in 1989 and sailed into Norfolk with her recovered treasure: gold coins, bars, nuggets, and dust, plus steamer trunks filled with period clothes, newspapers, books, and journals.

13. Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before

Author: by Tony Horwitz
Picador
English
496 pages

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In an exhilarating tale of historic adventure, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Confederates in the Attic retraces the voyages of Captain James Cook, the Yorkshire farm boy who drew the map of the modern world Captain James Cook’s three epic journeys in the 18th century were the last great voyages of discovery.

His ships sailed 150,000 miles, from the Artic to the Antarctic, from Tasmania to Oregon, from Easter Island to Siberia. When Cook set off for the Pacific in 1768, a third of the globe remained blank. By the time he died in Hawaii in 1779, the map of the world was substantially complete.

Tony Horwitz vividly recounts Cook’s voyages and the exotic scenes the captain encountered: tropical orgies, taboo rituals, cannibal feasts, human sacrifice. He also relives Cook’s adventures by following in the captain’s wake to places such as Tahiti, Savage Island, and the Great Barrier Reef to discover Cook’s embattled legacy in the present day.

Signing on as a working crewman aboard a replica of Cook’s vessel, Horwitz experiences the thrill and terror of sailing a tall ship. He also explores Cook the man: an impoverished farmboy who broke through the barriers of his class and time to become the greatest navigator in British history.

14


Shadow of the Titanic: The Extraordinary Stories of Those Who Survived

Author: by Andrew Wilson
Atria Books
English
416 pages

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From an acclaimed literary biographer, a riveting and groundbreaking account of what happened to the survivors of the Titanic. We think we know the story of the Titanicthe once majestic and supposedly unsinkable ship that struck an iceberg on its maiden voyage from Britain to Americabut very little has been written about the vessel’s 705 survivors.

How did the events of that horrific night in the icy waters of the North Atlantic affect the lives of those who lived to tell the tale? Drawing on a wealth of previously unpublished letters, memoirs, diaries, and interviews with their family members, award-winning journalist Andrew Wilson brings to life the survivors’ colorful voices, from the famous, like heiress Madeleine Astor, to the lesser known second-and third-class passengers, such as the Navratil brothers, who were traveling under assumed names because they were being abducted by their father.

More than one hundred years after that fateful voyage, Shadow of the Titanic adds an important new dimension to this enduringly captivating story.

15. Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

Author: by Cate Lineberry
Picador
English
304 pages

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“A stunning tale of a little-known figure in history. Robert Smalls’ astounding heroism during the Civil War helped convince Lincoln and the country that African Americans were extraordinarily capable of fighting for their freedom. Lineberry has produced a triumph in this heroic story that illuminates our country’s ongoing struggles with race.” Henry Louis Gates, Jr, Professor in American History Harvard University and Executive Producer of Finding Your RootsBe Free or Die makes you want to stand up and cheer.

Cate Lineberry has done us all a great service by telling this incredibly moving, thrilling, and important story about an American hero who deserves to be remembered, and admired. Candice Millard, author of Hero of the EmpireFacing death rather than enslavementa story of one man’s triumphant choice and ultimate rise to national heroIt was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer.

16. Italian Battleships: 'Conte di Cavour' and 'Duiio' Classes 1911–1956

Author: by Erminio Bagnasco
English
256 pages
1526799871

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Originally comprising five ships in two related classes, Conte di Cavour and Duilio classes entered service at the beginning of the Great War. As designed, they were powerful examples of the second generation of dreadnoughts, with a combination of twin and triple turrets producing a unique main armament of thirteen 12-inch guns.

This book covers all the technical details of the ships, both as built and as rebuilt, but also provides an extended history of their active service, including battle plans and track charts.