Best Social Philosophy Books

Here you will get Best Social Philosophy Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The 48 Laws of Power

Author: by Robert Greene
Penguin Books
English
452 pages

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Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this multi-million-copy New York Times bestseller is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control from the author of The Laws of Human Nature. In the book that People magazine proclaimed beguiling and fascinating, Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T.Barnum.

Some laws teach the need for prudence (Law 1: Never Outshine the Master), others teach the value of confidence (Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination.

In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.


2. 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

Author: by Jordan B. Peterson
Random House Canada
English
409 pages

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#1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLERWhat does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods?

What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world’s wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.


3. Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity―and Why This Harms Everybody

Author: by Helen Pluckrose
Pitchstone Publishing
English
352 pages

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Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Publishers Weekly Bestseller! Times, Sunday Times, and Financial Times Book-of-the-Year Selection! Have you heard that language is violence and that science is sexist? Have you read that certain people shouldn’t practice yoga or cook Chinese food?

Or been told that being obese is healthy, that there is no such thing as biological sex, or that only white people can be racist? Are you confused by these ideas, and do you wonder how they have managed so quickly to challenge the very logic of Western society?

In this probing and intrepid volume, Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay document the evolution of the dogma that informs these ideas, from its coarse origins in French postmodernism to its refinement within activist academic fields. Today this dogma is recognizable as much by its effects, such as cancel culture and social-media dogpiles, as by its tenets, which are all too often embraced as axiomatic in mainstream media: knowledge is a social construct; science and reason are tools of oppression; all human interactions are sites of oppressive power play; and language is dangerous.


4. Shape: The Hidden Geometry of Information, Biology, Strategy, Democracy, and Everything Else

Author: by Jordan Ellenberg
English
480 pages
1984879057

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An instant New York Times Bestseller! Unreasonably entertaining…. Reveals how geometric thinking can allow for everything from fairer American elections to better pandemic planning. The New York Times From the New York Times-bestselling author of How Not to Be Wronghimself a world-class geometera far-ranging exploration of the power of geometry, which turns out to help us think better about practically everything.

How should a democracy choose its representatives? How can you stop a pandemic from sweeping the world? How do computers learn to play Go, and why is learning Go so much easier for them than learning to read a sentence?

Can ancient Greek proportions predict the stock market?(Sorry, no. What should your kids learn in school if they really want to learn to think? All these are questions about geometry.For real. If you’re like most people, geometry is a sterile and dimly remembered exercise you gladly left behind in the dust of ninth grade, along with your braces and active romantic interest in pop singers.


5. A Conflict of Visions: Ideological Origins of Political Struggles

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Basic Books
English
352 pages

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Controversies in politics arise from many sources, but the conflicts that endure for generations or centuries show a remarkably consistent pattern. In this classic work, Thomas Sowell analyzes this pattern. He describes the two competing visions that shape our debates about the nature of reason, justice, equality, and power: the “constrained” vision, which sees human nature as unchanging and selfish, and the “unconstrained” vision, in which human nature is malleable and perfectible.

A Conflict of Visions offers a convincing case that ethical and policy disputes circle around the disparity between both outlooks.


6. The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?

Author: by Michael J. Sandel
English
288 pages
0374289980

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A Times Literary Supplement’s Book of the Year 2020A New Statesman’s Best Book of 2020A Bloomberg’s Best Book of 2020A Guardian Best Book About Ideas of 2020The world-renowned philosopher and author of the bestselling Justice explores the central question of our time: What has become of the common good?

These are dangerous times for democracy. We live in an age of winners and losers, where the odds are stacked in favor of the already fortunate. Stalled social mobility and entrenched inequality give the lie to the American credo that “you can make it if you try”. The consequence is a brew of anger and frustration that has fueled populist protest and extreme polarization, and led to deep distrust of both government and our fellow citizens-leaving us morally unprepared to face the profound challenges of our time.

World-renowned philosopher Michael J. Sandel argues that to overcome the crises that are upending our world, we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalization and rising inequality. Sandel shows the hubris a meritocracy generates among the winners and the harsh judgement it imposes on those left behind, and traces the dire consequences across a wide swath of American life.


7. Intellectuals and Society

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Basic Books
English
680 pages

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The influence of intellectuals is not only greater than in previous eras but also takes a very different form from that envisioned by those like Machiavelli and others who have wanted to directly influence rulers. It has not been by shaping the opinions or directing the actions of the holders of power that modern intellectuals have most influenced the course of events, but by shaping public opinion in ways that affect the actions of power holders in democratic societies, whether or not those power holders accept the general vision or the particular policies favored by intellectuals.

Even government leaders with disdain or contempt for intellectuals have had to bend to the climate of opinion shaped by those intellectuals. Intellectuals and Society not only examines the track record of intellectuals in the things they have advocated but also analyzes the incentives and constraints under which their views and visions have emerged.

One of the most surprising aspects of this study is how often intellectuals have been proved not only wrong, but grossly and disastrously wrong in their prescriptions for the ills of society – and how little their views have changed in response to empirical evidence of the disasters entailed by those views.


8. The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium

Author: by Martin Gurri
Stripe Press
English
448 pages

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In the words of economist and scholar Arnold Kling, Martin Gurri saw it coming. Technology has categorically reversed the information balance of power between the public and the elites who manage the great hierarchical institutions of the industrial age government, political parties, the media.

The Revolt of the Public tells the story of how insurgencies, enabled by digital devices and a vast information sphere, have mobilized millions of ordinary people around the world. Originally published in 2014, this updated edition of The Revolt of the Public includes an extensive analysis of Donald Trump’s improbable rise to the presidency and the electoral triumphs of Brexit and concludes with a speculative look forward, pondering whether the current elite class can bring about a reformation of the democratic process, and whether new organizing principles, adapted to a digital world, can arise out of the present political turbulence.

“All over the world, elite institutions from governments to media to academia are losing their authority and monopoly control of information to dynamic amateurs and the broader public. This book, until now only in samizdat (and Kindle) form, has been my #1 handout for the last several years to anyone seeking to understand this unfolding shift in power from hierarchies to networks in the age of the Internet.” -Marc Andreessen, co-founder, Netscape and Andreessen Horowitz “We are in an open war between publics with passionate and untutored interests and elites who believe they have the right to guide those publics.


9. Finite and Infinite Games

Author: by James Carse
English

160 pages
1476731713

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There are at least two kinds of games, states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. One could be called finite; the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play.

Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may changeas long as the game is never allowed to come to an end.

What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we playfinitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives? Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely.

10. Dedicated: The Case for Commitment in an Age of Infinite Browsing

Author: by Pete Davis
English
272 pages
1982140909

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A profoundly inspiring and transformative argument that purposeful commitment can be a powerful force in our age of restlessness and indecision. Most of us have had this experience: browsing through countless options on Netflix, unable to commit to watching any given movieand losing so much time skimming reviews and considering trailers that it’s too late to watch anything at all.

In a book borne of an idea first articulated in a viral commencement address, Pete Davis argues that this is the defining characteristic of the moment: keeping our options open. We are stuck in Infinite Browsing Modeswiping through endless dating profiles without committing to a single partner, jumping from place to place searching for the next big thing, and refusing to make any decision that might close us off from an even better choice we imagine is just around the corner.

This culture of restlessness and indecision, Davis argues, is causing tension in the lives of young people today: We want to keep our options open, and yet we yearn for the purpose, community, and depth that can only come from making deep commitments.

11. Incerto: Fooled by Randomness, The Black Swan, The Bed of Procrustes, Antifragile

Author: by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
English
1568 pages
0399590455

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Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s landmark Incerto series is an investigation of luck, uncertainty, probability, opacity, human error, risk, disorder, and decision-making in a world we don’t understand, in nonoverlapping and standalone books. All four volumesAntifragile, The Black Swan, Fooled by Randomness, and the expanded edition of The Bed of Procrustes, updated with more than 50 percent new materialare now together in one boxed set.

ANTIFRAGILE Startling … Richly crammed with insights, stories, fine phrases and intriguing asides. The Wall Street Journal Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, many things in life benefit from disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls antifragile is that category of things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish.

The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better. What is crucial is that the antifragile loves errors, as it incurs small harm and large benefits from them. Spanning politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems, and medicine in an interdisciplinary and erudite style, Antifragile is a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world.

12. The Trouble with Being Born

Author: by E. M. Cioran
Arcade
English
224 pages

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A love of Cioran creates an urge to press his writing into someone’s hand, and is followed by an equal urge to pull it away as poison. The New YorkerIn this volume, which reaffirms the uncompromising brilliance of his mind, Cioran strips the human condition down to its most basic components, birth and death, suggesting that disaster lies not in the prospect of death but in the fact of birth, “that laughable accident.” In the lucid, aphoristic style that characterizes his work, Cioran writes of time and death, God and religion, suicide and suffering, and the temptation to silence.

Through sharp observation and patient contemplation, Cioran cuts to the heart of the human experience. In the company of Nietzsche and Kierkegaard.”Publishers Weekly”No modern writer twists the knife with Cioran’s dexterity….His writing … Is informed with the bitterness of genuine compassion.”Boston Phoenix

13. The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (Perennial Classics)

Author: by Eric Hoffer
English
192 pages
0060505915

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Its theme is political fanaticism, with which it deals severely and brilliantly. New YorkerA stevedore on the San Francisco docks in the 1940s, Eric Hoffer wrote philosophical treatises in his spare time while living in the railroad yards. The True Believerthe first and most famous of his bookswas made into a bestseller when President Eisenhower cited it during one of the earliest television press conferences.

Called a brilliant and original inquiry and a genuine contribution to our social thought by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., this landmark in the field of social psychology is completely relevant and essential for understanding the world today as it delivers a visionary, highly provocative look into the mind of the fanatic and a penetrating study of how an individual becomes one.

14. The Quest for Cosmic Justice

Author: by Thomas Sowell
Free Press
English
224 pages

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This is not a comforting book – it is a book about disturbing issues that are urgently important today and enduringly critical for the future. It rejects both “merit” and historical redress as principles for guiding public policy. It shows how “peace” movements have led to war and to needless casualties in those wars.

It argues that “equality” is neither right nor wrong, but meaningless. The Quest for Cosmic Justice shows how confused conceptions of justice end up promoting injustice, how confused conceptions of equality end up promoting inequality, and how the tyranny of social visions prevents many people from confronting the actual consequences of their own beliefs and policies.

Those consequences include the steady and dangerous erosion of the fundamental principles of freedom – and the quiet repeal of the American revolution.

15. Incerto (Deluxe Edition): Fooled by Randomness, The Black Swan, The Bed of Procrustes, Antifragile, Skin in the Game

Author: by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Random House
English
1856 pages

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The landmark five-book seriesnow in a beautifully designed, cloth-bound deluxe hardcover boxed setThe Incerto is an investigation of opacity, luck, uncertainty, probability, human error, risk, and decision making when we don’t understand the world, expressed in the form of a personal essay with autobiographical sections, stories, parables, and philosophical, historical, and scientific discussions, in non-overlapping volumes that can be accessed in any order.

The main thread is that while there is inordinate uncertainty about what is going on, there is great certainty as to what one should do about it. This deluxe boxed set includes:FOOLED BY RANDOMNESSTHE BLACK SWANTHE BED OF PROCRUSTESANTIFRAGILESKIN IN THE GAME

16. Robert Greene 2 Books Collection Set (Mastery, The 48 Laws Of Power)

Author: by Robert Greene
English
9124039926
978-9124039929

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Please Note That The Following Individual Books As Per Original ISBN and Cover Image In this Listing shall be Dispatched Collectively: Robert Greene 2 Books Collection Set: Mastery: Around the globe, people are facing the same problem – that we are born as individuals but are forced to conform to the rules of society if we want to succeed.

To see our uniqueness expressed in our achievements, we must first learn the rules – and then how to change them completely. Charles Darwin began as an underachieving schoolboy, Leonardo da Vinci as an illegitimate outcast. The secret of their eventual greatness lies in a ‘rigorous apprenticeship’: by paying close and careful attention, they learnt to master the ‘hidden codes’ which determine ultimate success or failure.

The 48 Laws Of Power: Drawn from 3,000 years of the history of power, this is the definitive guide to help readers achieve for themselves what Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, Louis XIV and Machiavelli learnt the hard way. Law 1: Never outshine the master Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends; learn how to use enemies Law 3: Conceal your intentions Law 4: Always say less than necessary.