Best U.S. Civil War Confederacy History Books

Here you will get Best U.S. Civil War Confederacy History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner's Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause

Author: by Ty Seidule
Published at: St. Martin's Press (January 26, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1250239266

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“Ty Seidule scorches us with the truth and rivets us with his fierce sense of moral urgency.” -Ron ChernowIn a forceful but humane narrative, former soldier and head of the West Point history department Ty Seidule’s Robert E. Lee and Me challenges the myths and lies of the Confederate legacyand explores why some of this country’s oldest wounds have never healed.

Ty Seidule grew up revering Robert E.Lee. From his southern childhood to his service in the U.S. Army, every part of his life reinforced the Lost Cause myth: that Lee was the greatest man who ever lived, and that the Confederates were underdogs who lost the Civil War with honor.

Now, as a retired brigadier general and Professor Emeritus of History at West Point, his view has radically changed. From a soldier, a scholar, and a southerner, Ty Seidule believes that American history demands a reckoning. In a unique blend of history and reflection, Seidule deconstructs the truth about the Confederacythat its undisputed primary goal was the subjugation and enslavement of Black Americansand directly challenges the idea of honoring those who labored to preserve that system and committed treason in their failed attempt to achieve it.


2. Thaddeus Stevens: Civil War Revolutionary, Fighter for Racial Justice

Author: by Bruce Levine
Published at: Simon & Schuster (March 2, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1476793375

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The definitive biography of one of the 19th century’s greatest statesmen, encompassing his decades-long fight against slavery, his key role in the Union war effort, and his postwar struggle to bring racial justice to America. Thaddeus Stevens was among the first to see the Civil War as an opportunity for a second American revolutiona chance to remake the country as a true multiracial democracy.

One of the foremost abolitionists in Congress in the years leading up to the war, he was a leader of the young Republican Party’s radical wing, fighting for anti-slavery and anti-racist policies long before party colleagues like Abraham Lincoln endorsed them.

It was he, for instance, who urged Lincoln early on to free those enslaved throughout the US and to welcome black men into the Union’s armies. During the Reconstruction era following the Civil War, Stevens demanded equal civil and political rights for black Americans, rights eventually embodied in the 14th and 15th amendments.


3. Lincoln on the Verge: Thirteen Days to Washington

Author: by Ted Widmer
Published at: Simon & Schuster (December 29, 2020)
ISBN: 978-1476739441

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WINNER OF THE LINCOLN FORUM BOOK PRIZE A Lincoln classic…Superb. The Washington Post A book for our time. Doris Kearns Goodwin Lincoln on the Verge tells the dramatic story of America’s greatest president discovering his own strength to save the Republic.

As a divided nation plunges into the deepest crisis in its history, Abraham Lincoln boards a train for Washington and his inaugurationan inauguration Southerners have vowed to prevent. Lincoln on the Verge charts these pivotal thirteen days of travel, as Lincoln discovers his power, speaks directly to the public, and sees his country up close.

Drawing on new research, this riveting account reveals the president-elect as a work in progress, showing him on the verge of greatness, as he foils an assassination attempt, forges an unbreakable bond with the American people, and overcomes formidable obstacles in order to take his oath of office.


4. The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution

Author: by James Oakes
Published at: W. W. Norton & Company (January 12, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1324005858

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An award-winning scholar uncovers the guiding principles of Lincoln’s antislavery strategies. The long and turning path to the abolition of American slavery has often been attributed to the equivocations and inconsistencies of antislavery leaders, including Lincoln himself. But James Oakes’s brilliant history of Lincoln’s antislavery strategies reveals a striking consistency and commitment extending over many years.

The linchpin of antislavery for Lincoln was the Constitution of the United States. Lincoln adopted the antislavery view that the Constitution made freedom the rule in the United States, slavery the exception. Where federal power prevailed, so did freedom. Where state power prevailed, that state determined the status of slavery, and the federal government could not interfere.

It would take state action to achieve the final abolition of American slavery. With this understanding, Lincoln and his antislavery allies used every tool available to undermine the institution. Wherever the Constitution empowered direct federal actionin the western territories, in the District of Columbia, over the slave tradethey intervened.


5. Jack Hinson's One-Man War, A Civil War Sniper

Author: by Tom McKenney
Published at: Pelican; Illustrated edition (February 15, 2009)
ISBN: 978-1589806405

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The true story of one man’s reluctant but relentless war against the invaders of his country. A quiet, wealthy plantation owner, Jack Hinson watched the start of the Civil War with disinterest. Opposed to secession and a friend to Union and Confederate commanders alike, he did not want a war.

After Union soldiers seized and murdered his sons, placing their decapitated heads on the gateposts of his estate, Hinson could remain indifferent no longer. He commissioned a special rifle for long-range accuracy, he took to the woods, and he set out for revenge.

This remarkable biography presents the story of Jack Hinson, a lone Confederate sniper who, at the age of 57, waged a personal war on Grant’s army and navy. The result of 15 years of scholarship, this meticulously researched and beautifully written work is the only account of Hinson’s life ever recorded and involves an unbelievable cast of characters, including the Earp brothers, Jesse James, and Nathan Bedford Forrest.


6. Stars in Their Courses: The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1863

Author: by Shelby Foote
Published at: Modern Library; 1st edition (June 28, 1994)
ISBN: 978-0679601128

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A matchless account of the Battle of Gettysburg, drawn from Shelby Foote’s landmark history of the Civil War Shelby Foote’s monumental three-part chronicle, The Civil War: A Narrative, was hailed by Walker Percy as an unparalleled achievement, an American Iliad, a unique work uniting the scholarship of the historian and the high readability of the first-class novelist.

Here is the central chapter of the central volume, and therefore the capstone of the arch, in a single volume. Complete with detailed maps, Stars in Their Courses brilliantly recreates the three-day conflict: It is a masterly treatment of a key great battle and the events that preceded itnot as legend has it but as it really was, before it became distorted by controversy and overblown by remembered glory.


7. Lincoln and the Irish: The Untold Story of How the Irish Helped Abraham Lincoln Save the Union

Author: by Niall O'Dowd
Published at: Skyhorse (March 6, 2018)
ISBN: 978-1510736344

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From the founder of IrishCentral, a fascinating piece of Civil War history: Lincoln’s relationship with the immigrants arriving in America to escape the Irish famine. If you’re a Lincoln fan like me, you’ll love this book. Liam NeesonWhen Pickett charged at Gettysburg, it was the all-Irish Pennsylvania 69th who held fast while the surrounding regiments broke and ran.

And it was Abraham Lincoln who, a year earlier at Malvern Hill, picked up a corner of one of the Irish colors, kissed it, and said, God bless the Irish flag. Renowned Irish-American journalist Niall O’Dowd gives unprecedented insight into a relationship that began with mutual disdain.

Lincoln saw the Irish as instinctive supporters of the Democratic opposition, while the Irish saw the English landlord class in Lincoln’s Republicans. But that dynamic would evolve, and the Lincoln whose first political actions included intimidating Irish voters at the polls would eventually hire Irish nannies and donate to the Irish famine fund.


8. Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

Author: by S. C. Gwynne
Published at: Scribner; Reprint edition (October 6, 2015)
ISBN: 978-1451673296

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Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the epic New York Times bestselling account of how Civil War general Thomas Stonewall Jackson became a great and tragic national hero. Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance.

As much as any person in the Confederate pantheoneven Robert E. Leehe embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country’s greatest military figures. In April 1862, however, he was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause.

But by June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.

In his magnificent Rebel YellS.C. Gwynne brings Jackson ferociously to life (New York Newsday) in a swiftly vivid narrative that is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict among historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson’s private life and traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.


9. The Civil War: A Visual History

Author: by DK
Published at: DK; Revised edition (January 19, 2015)
ISBN: 978-1465429575

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The story of America’s bloodiest conflict is still as meaningful today as it was in 1865. This comprehensive, visually arresting guide covers the history, causes, and consequences of the Civil War. It provides eyewitness accounts by soldiers and civilians, key profiles of military leaders, and clear timelines that give an overview of how the events developed.

This lavish volume is illustrated throughout with photography and paintings and includes detailed galleries showcasing weapons, equipment, and other artifacts. This expanded edition also comes with informative and photographic features on memorial sites associated with the Civil War. Produced in association with the Smithsonian Institute, The Civil War: A Visual History is an invaluable resource for schools and libraries, as well as a perfect companion for anyone interested in military and social history.

Packed with information on key locations, the treatment of wounded soldiers, and slavery, this is a rich, detailed account of one of the most controversial conflicts of our time.

10. Fighting for the Confederacy: The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander (Civil War America)

Author: by Gary W. Gallagher
Published at: University of North Carolina Press; Fourth Printing edition (March 2, 1998)
ISBN: 978-0807847220

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Originally published by UNC Press in 1989, Fighting for the Confederacy is one of the richest personal accounts in all of the vast literature on the Civil War. Alexander was involved in nearly all of the great battles of the East, from First Manassas through Appomattox, and his duties brought him into frequent contact with most of the high command of the Army of Northern Virginia, including Robert E.

Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and James Longstreet. No other Civil War veteran of his stature matched Alexander’s ability to discuss operations in penetrating detail- this is especially true of his description of Gettysburg. His narrative is also remarkable for its utterly candid appraisals of leaders on both sides.

11

The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West
Author: by Megan Kate Nelson
Published at: Scribner (February 16, 2021)
ISBN: 978-1501152559

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A dramatic, riveting, and fresh look at a region typically obscured in accounts of the Civil War. American history buffs will relish this entertaining and eye-opening portrait (Publishers Weekly). Megan Kate Nelson expands our understanding of how the Civil War affected Indigenous peoples and helped to shape the nation (Library Journal, starred review), reframing the era as one of national conflictinvolving not just the North and South, but also the West.

Against the backdrop of this larger series of battles, Nelson introduces nine individuals: John R. Baylor, a Texas legislator who established the Confederate Territory of Arizona; Louisa Hawkins Canby, a Union Army wife who nursed Confederate soldiers back to health in Santa Fe; James Carleton, a professional soldier who engineered campaigns against Navajos and Apaches; Kit Carson, a famous frontiersman who led a regiment of volunteers against the Texans, Navajos, Kiowas, and Comanches; Juanita, a Navajo weaver who resisted Union campaigns against her people; Bill Davidson, a soldier who fought in all of the Confederacy’s major battles in New Mexico; Alonzo Ickis, an Iowa-born gold miner who fought on the side of the Union; John Clark, a friend of Abraham Lincoln’s who embraced the Republican vision for the West as New Mexico’s surveyor-general; and Mangas Coloradas, a revered Chiricahua Apache chief who worked to expand Apache territory in Arizona.

12. Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War

Author: by Tony Horwitz
Published at: Vintage (February 22, 1999)
ISBN: 978-0679758334

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National Bestseller For all who remain intrigued by the legacy of the Civil War – reenactors, battlefield visitors, Confederate descendants and other Southerners, history fans, students of current racial conflicts, and more – this ten-state adventure is part travelogue, part social commentary and always good-humored.

When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains, he thinks he’s put war zones behind him. But awakened one morning by the crackle of musket fire, Horwitz starts filing front-line dispatches again this time from a war close to home, and to his own heart.

Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America’s greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance.

13. The Myth of the Lost Cause: Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won

Author: by Edward H. Bonekemper III
Published at: Regnery History (October 5, 2015)
ISBN: 978-1621574545

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James Swanson has written a terrific narrative of the hunt for Lincoln’s killers that will mesmerize the reader from start to finish just as the actual manhunt mesmerized the entire nation. It is a triumphant book. Doris Kearns Godwin The murder of Abraham Lincoln set off the greatest manhunt in American history-the pursuit and capture of John Wilkes Booth.

From April 14 to April 26, 1865, the assassin led Union cavalry troops on a wild, 12-day chase from the streets of Washington, D.C., across the swamps of Maryland, and into the forests of Virginia, while the nation, still reeling from the just-ended Civil War, watched in horror and sadness.

Based on rare archival materials, obscure trial transcripts, and Lincoln’s own blood relics Manhunt is a fully documented, fascinating tale of murder, intrigue, and betrayal. A gripping hour-by-hour account told through the eyes of the hunted and the hunters, it is history as it’s never been read before.

15. The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

Author: by Ulysses S. Grant
Published at: Liveright; 1st edition (December 4, 2018)

ISBN: 978-1631492440

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With kaleidoscopic, trenchant, path-breaking insights, Elizabeth D. Samet has produced the most ambitious edition of Ulysses Grant’s Memoirs yet published. One hundred and thirty-three years after its 1885 publication by Mark Twain, Elizabeth Samet has annotated this lavish edition of Grant’s landmark memoir, and expands the Civil War backdrop against which this monumental American life is typically read.

No previous edition combines such a sweep of historical and cultural contexts with the literary authority that Samet, an English professor obsessed with Grant for decades, brings to the table. Whether exploring novels Grant read at West Point or presenting majestic images culled from archives, Samet curates a richly annotated, highly collectible edition that will fascinate Civil War buffs.

The edition also breaks new ground in its attack on the Lost Cause revisionism that still distorts our national conversation about the legacy of the Civil War. Never has Grant’s transformation from tanner’s son to military leader been more insightfully and passionately explained than in this timely edition, appearing on the 150th anniversary of Grant’s 1868 presidential election.83 illustrations

16. This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library)

Author: by Drew Gilpin Faust
Published at: Vintage; Illustrated edition (January 6, 2009)
ISBN: 978-0375703836

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More than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives in the American Civil War. An equivalent proportion of today’s population would be six million. In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent God.

Throughout, the voices of soldiers and their families, of statesmen, generals, preachers, poets, surgeons, nurses, northerners and southerners come together to give us a vivid understanding of the Civil War’s most fundamental and widely shared reality.