Best U.S. Immigrant History Books

Here you will get Best U.S. Immigrant History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Author: by Isabel Wilkerson
Vintage
English
640 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In this beautifully written masterwork, the Pulitzer Prizewinning author chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.


2. American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Author: by Colin Woodard

0143122029
Penguin Books
English

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A New Republic Best Book of the Year The Globalist Top Books of the Year Winner of the Maine Literary Award for Non-fiction Particularly relevant in understanding who voted for who in this presidential election year, this is an endlessly fascinating look at American regionalism and the eleven nations that continue to shape North AmericaAccording to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots.

In American Nations he takes readers on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, offering a revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity, and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future.

From the Deep South to the Far West, to Yankeedom to El Norte, Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how each region continues to uphold its distinguishing ideals and identities today, with results that can be seen in the composition of the U.S.


3. A Nation of Immigrants

Author: by John F. Kennedy
B07D6NQPG7
October 16, 2018
English

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This significant contribution to the debate on immigration reform was President John F. Kennedy’s final book and is as timely now as it was when it was first publishednow reissued for its 60th anniversary, with a new introduction and foreword.

In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history…. It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.Robert F.

KennedyThroughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland.

This 60th anniversary edition of his posthumously published, timeless workwith a new introduction, a new foreword by Jonathan Greenblatt, the national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, and updated information on immigration policy reformoffers the late president’s inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America.


4. Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own

Author: by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
Crown
English
272 pages

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A powerful study of how to bear witness in a moment when America is being called to do the same. Time James Baldwin grew disillusioned by the failure of the civil rights movement to force America to confront its lies about race.

What can we learn from his struggle in our own moment? Named one of the best books of the year by Time, The Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune Winner of the Stowe Prize Shortlisted for the Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice Not everything is lost.

Responsibility cannot be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again. James Baldwin Begin Again is one of the great books on James Baldwin and a powerful reckoning with America’s ongoing failure to confront the lies it tells itself about race.

Just as in Baldwin’s after times, argues Eddie S. Glaude Jr., when white Americans met the civil rights movement’s call for truth and justice with blind rage and the murders of movement leaders, so in our moment were the Obama presidency and the birth of Black Lives Matter answered with the ascendance of Trump and the violent resurgence of white nationalism.


5. Caste: A Brief History of Racism, Sexism, Classism, Ageism, Homophobia, Religious Intolerance, Xenophobia, and Reasons for Hope

Author: by University Press
B08CGDMP6K
English
57 pages

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University Press returns with another short and captivating book a brief history of caste, bias, and discrimination. We have inherited a world full of humans who have been healed and hurt by other humans. There was a time, in an age before this one, when ignorance was forgivable.

But that time has passed. Now is not the time for the enlightened to sneer at the brutes. Sneering hurts people. And hurt people hurt people.No. Now is the time for healing. And healing begins with introspection and a recognition of our own caste, our own biases, and our own discrimination.

And introspection begins with a glimpse of the past. This short book peels back the veil and provides a brief glimpse into the history of seven virulent and persistent human biases a glimpse that you can read in about an hour.


6. Different Mirror: A History Of Multicultural America

Author: by Ronald Takaki
0316022365
Back Bay Books
English

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Ronald Takaki’s beloved classic is a “brilliant revisionist history of America” (Publishers Weekly) that dramatically retells our nation’s story from the perspective of minorities. Upon its first publication, A Different Mirror was hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation’s past.

Beginning with the colonization of the New World, it recounted the history of America in the voice of the non-Anglo peoples of the United States-Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, Irish Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and others-groups who helped create this country’s rich mosaic culture.

Now, Ronald Takaki has revised his landmark work and made it even more relevant and important. Among the new additions to the book are: The role of black soldiers in preserving the UnionThe history of Chinese Americans from 1900-1941An investigation into the hot-button issue of “illegal” immigrants from MexicoA look at the sudden visibility of Muslim refugees from Afghanistan.


7. Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob

Author: by Russell Shorto
English
272 pages
0393245586

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One of Newsweek’s Most Highly Anticipated New Books of 2021 Family secrets emerge as a best-selling author dives into the history of the mob in small-town America. Best-selling author Russell Shorto, praised for his incisive works of narrative history, never thought to write about his own past.

He grew up knowing his grandfather and namesake was a small-town mob boss but maintained an unspoken family vow of silence. Then an elderly relative prodded: You’re a writerwhat are you gonna do about the story? Smalltime is a mob story straight out of central castingbut with a difference, for the small-town mob, which stretched from Schenectady to Fresno, is a mostly unknown world.

The location is the brawny postwar factory town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The setting is City Cigar, a storefront next to City Hall, behind which Russ and his brother-in-law, Little Joe, operate a gambling empire and effectively run the town. Smalltime is a riveting American immigrant story that travels back to Risorgimento Sicily, to the ancient, dusty, hill-town home of Antonino Sciotto, the author’s great-grandfather, who leaves his wife and children in grinding poverty for a new lifeand wifein a Pennsylvania mining town.


8. Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith

Author: by Jon Krakauer
B000FC1R2S
Anchor (June 8, 2004)
June 8, 2004


Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith Cover

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This extraordinary work of investigative journalism takes readers inside America’s isolated Mormon Fundamentalist communities, where some 40,000 people still practice polygamy. Defying both civil authorities and the Mormon establishment in Salt Lake City, the renegade leaders of these Taliban-like theocracies are zealots who answer only to God.

At the core of Krakauer’s book are brothers Ron and Dan Lafferty, who insist they received a commandment from God to kill a blameless woman and her baby girl. Beginning with a meticulously researched account of this appalling double murder, Krakauer constructs a multi-layered, bone-chilling narrative of messianic delusion, polygamy, savage violence, and unyielding faith.

Along the way he uncovers a shadowy offshoot of America’s fastest growing religion, and raises provocative questions about the nature of religious belief.


9. The Making of Asian America: A History

Author: by Erika Lee
1476739412
Simon & Schuster
English

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A comprehensivefascinating (The New York Times Book Review) history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, by one of the nation’s preeminent scholars on the subject, with a new afterword about the recent hate crimes against Asian Americans.

In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But much of their long history has been forgotten. In her sweeping, powerful new book, Erika Lee considers the rich, complicated, and sometimes invisible histories of Asians in the United States (Huffington Post).

The Making of Asian America shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life, from sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500 to the Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II.

Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. But as Lee shows, Asian Americans have continued to struggle as both despised minorities and model minorities, revealing all the ways that racism has persisted in their lives and in the life of the country.

10. The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels

Author: by Jon Meacham
B079KV32KF
Random House (May 8, 2018)
May 8, 2018

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Pulitzer Prizewinning author Jon Meacham helps us understand the present moment in American politics and life by looking back at critical times in our history when hope overcame division and fear. ONE OF OPRAH’S BOOKS THAT HELP ME THROUGH NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR The Christian Science Monitor Southern Living Our current climate of partisan fury is not new, and in The Soul of America Meacham shows us how what Abraham Lincoln called the better angels of our nature have repeatedly won the day.

Painting surprising portraits of Lincoln and other presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D.Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, and Lyndon B. Johnson, and illuminating the courage of such influential citizen activists as Martin Luther King, Jr., early suffragettes Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, civil rights pioneers Rosa Parks and John Lewis, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Army-McCarthy hearings lawyer Joseph N.

11. Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? (King Legacy)

Author: by Martin Luther Dr. King Jr.
Beacon Press
English
256 pages

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In 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., isolated himself from the demands of the civil rights movement, rented a house in Jamaica with no telephone, and labored over his final manuscript. In this prophetic work, which has been unavailable for more than ten years, he lays out his thoughts, plans, and dreams for America’s future, including the need for better jobs, higher wages, decent housing, and quality education.

With a universal message of hope that continues to resonate, King demanded an end to global suffering, asserting that humankind-for the first time-has the resources and technology to eradicate poverty.

12. The Case for Trump

Author: by Victor Davis Hanson
Basic Books
English
400 pages

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From an award-winning historian and regular Fox contributor, the true story of how Donald Trump has become one of the most successful presidents in history – and why America needs him now more than ever In The Case for Trump, award-winning historian and political commentator Victor Davis Hanson explains how a celebrity businessman with no political or military experience triumphed over sixteen well-qualified Republican rivals, a Democrat with a quarter-billion-dollar war chest, and a hostile media and Washington establishment to become president of the United States – and an extremely successful president.

Trump alone saw a political opportunity in defending the working people of America’s interior whom the coastal elite of both parties had come to scorn, Hanson argues. And Trump alone had the instincts and energy to pursue this opening to victory, dismantle a corrupt old order, and bring long-overdue policy changes at home and abroad.

We could not survive a series of presidencies as volatile as Trump’s. But after decades of drift, America needs the outsider Trump to do what normal politicians would not and could not do.Age Range:Adult

13. Roosevelt and the Holocaust: How FDR Saved the Jews and Brought Hope to a Nation

Author: by Robert L. Beir
B06XQ6D7LH
Skyhorse
June 1, 2013

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The year was 1932.At age fourteen Robert Beir’s journey through life changed irrevocably when a classmate called him a dirty Jew. Suddenly Beir encountered the belligerent poison of anti-Semitism. The safe confines of his upbringing had been violated. The pain that he felt at that moment was far more hurtful than any blow.

Its memory would last a lifetime. Beir’s experiences with anti-Semitism served as a microcosm for the anti-Semitism among the majority of Americans. That year, a politician named Franklin Delano Roosevelt ascended to the presidency. Over the next twelve years, he became a scion of optimism and carried a refreshing, unbridled confidence in a nation previously mired in fear and deeply depressed.

His policies and ethics saved the capitalist system. His strong leadership and unwavering faith helped to defeat Hitler. The Jews of America revered President Roosevelt. To a young Robert Beir, Roosevelt was an American hero. In mid-life, however, Beir experienced a conflict.

14. Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right

Author: by Jane Mayer
Anchor
English
576 pages

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NATIONAL BESTSELLERONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEARWho are the immensely wealthy right-wing ideologues shaping the fate of America today? From the bestselling author of The Dark Side, an electrifying work of investigative journalism that uncovers the agenda of this powerful group.

In her new preface, Jane Mayer discusses the results of the most recent election and Donald Trump’s victory, and how, despite much discussion to the contrary, this was a huge victory for the billionaires who have been pouring money in the American political system.

Why is America living in an age of profound and widening economic inequality? Why have even modest attempts to address climate change been defeated again and again? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers?

In a riveting and indelible feat of reporting, Jane Mayer illuminates the history of an elite cadre of plutocratsheaded by the Kochs, the Scaifes, the Olins, and the Bradleyswho have bankrolled a systematic plan to fundamentally alter the American political system.

15. Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA

Author: by Tim Weiner
Anchor
English
848 pages

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With shocking revelations that made headlines in papers across the country, Pulitzer-Prize-winner Tim Weiner gets at the truth behind the CIA and uncovers here why nearly every CIA Director has left the agency in worse shape than when he found it; and how these profound failures jeopardize our national security.

16. Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life

Author: by Karen E. Fields
Verso
English
310 pages

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Tackling the myth of a post-racial societyMost people assume that racism grows from a perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. Sociologist Karen E. Fields and historian Barbara J. Fields argue otherwise: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call racecraft.

And this phenomenon is intimately entwined with other forms of inequality in American life. So pervasive are the devices of racecraft in American history, economic doctrine, politics, and everyday thinking that the presence of racecraft itself goes unnoticed. That the promised post-racial age has not dawned, the authors argue, reflects the failure of Americans to develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality.

That failure should worry everyone who cares about democratic institutions.