Best World War II History Books

Here you will get Best World War II History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War

Author: by Malcolm Gladwell
Little, Brown and Company
English
256 pages

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An exploration of how technology and best intentions collide in the heat of warA New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice In The Bomber Mafia, Malcolm Gladwell weaves together the stories of a Dutch genius and his homemade computer, a band of brothers in central Alabama, a British psychopath, and pyromaniacal chemists at Harvard to examine one of the greatest moral challenges in modern American history.

Most military thinkers in the years leading up to World War II saw the airplane as an afterthought. But a small band of idealistic strategists, the Bomber Mafia, asked: What if precision bombing could cripple the enemy and make war far less lethal?

In contrast, the bombing of Tokyo on the deadliest night of the war was the brainchild of General Curtis LeMay, whose brutal pragmatism and scorched-earth tactics in Japan cost thousands of civilian lives, but may have spared even more by averting a planned US invasion.

In The Bomber Mafia, Gladwell asks, Was it worth it? Things might have gone differently had LeMay’s predecessor, General Haywood Hansell, remained in charge. Hansell believed in precision bombing, but when he and Curtis LeMay squared off for a leadership handover in the jungles of Guam, LeMay emerged victorious, leading to the darkest night of World War II.


2. The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz

Author: by Erik Larson
B07TRVW6VX
Crown (February 25, 2020)
February 25, 2020

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The author of The Devil in the White City and Dead Wake delivers an intimate chronicle of Winston Churchill and London during the Blitzan inspiring portrait of courage and leadership in a time of unprecedented crisis One of [Erik Larson’s] best books yet …

Perfectly timed for the moment. Time A bravura performance by one of America’s greatest storytellers. NPR NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review Time Vogue NPR The Washington Post Chicago Tribune The Globe & Mail Fortune Bloomberg New York Post The New York Public Library Kirkus Reviews LibraryReads PopMattersOn Winston Churchill’s first day as prime minister, Adolf Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium.

Poland and Czechoslovakia had already fallen, and the Dunkirk evacuation was just two weeks away. For the next twelve months, Hitler would wage a relentless bombing campaign, killing 45,000 Britons. It was up to Churchill to hold his country together and persuade President Franklin Roosevelt that Britain was a worthy allyand willing to fight to the end.


3. The Light of Days: The Untold Story of Women Resistance Fighters in Hitler's Ghettos

Author: by Judy Batalion
B07Y8D58BR
April 6, 2021
English

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THE INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! Also on the USA Today, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Globe and Mail, Publishers Weekly, and Indie bestseller lists. One of the most important stories of World War II, already optioned by Steven Spielberg for a major motion picture: a spectacular, searing history that brings to light the extraordinary accomplishments of brave Jewish women who became resistance fightersa group of unknown heroes whose exploits have never been chronicled in full, until now.

Witnesses to the brutal murder of their families and neighbors and the violent destruction of their communities, a cadre of Jewish women in Polandsome still in their teenshelped transform the Jewish youth groups into resistance cells to fight the Nazis.

With courage, guile, and nerves of steel, these ghetto girls paid off Gestapo guards, hid revolvers in loaves of bread and jars of marmalade, and helped build systems of underground bunkers. They flirted with German soldiers, bribed them with wine, whiskey, and home cooking, used their Aryan looks to seduce them, and shot and killed them.


4. Facing the Mountain: A True Story of Japanese American Heroes in World War II

Author: by Daniel James Brown
Viking (May 11, 2021)
English
560 pages

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A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Masterly. An epic story of four Japanese-American families and their sons who volunteered for military service and displayed uncommon heroism Propulsive and gripping, in part because of Mr. Brown’s ability to make us care deeply about the fates of these individual soldiers…A page-turner.

Wall Street Journal A masterwork of American history that will change the way we look at World War II.”Adam Makos, author of A Higher Call From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Boys in the Boat, a gripping World War II saga of patriotism, highlighting the contributions and sacrifices that Japanese immigrants and their American-born children made for the sake of the nation: the courageous Japanese-American Army unit that overcame brutal odds in Europe; their families, incarcerated back home; and a young man who refused to surrender his constitutional rights, even if it meant imprisonment.

They came from across the continent and Hawaii. Their parents taught them to embrace both their Japanese heritage and the ways of America. They faced bigotry, yet they believed in their bright futures as American citizens. But within days of Pearl Harbor, the FBI was ransacking their houses and locking up their fathers.


5. The Hiding Place

Author: by Corrie Ten Boom
0800794052

Chosen Books
English

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Corrie ten Boom was a woman admired the world over for her courage, her forgiveness, and her memorable faith. In World War II, she and her family risked their lives to help Jews escape the Nazis, and their reward was a trip to Hitler’s concentration camps.

But she survived and was released-as a result of a clerical error-and now shares the story of how faith triumphs over evil. For thirty-five years Corrie’s dramatic life story, full of timeless virtues, has prepared readers to face their own futures with faith, relying on God’s love to overcome, heal, and restore.

Now releasing in a thirty-fifth anniversary edition for a new generation of readers, The Hiding Place tells the riveting story of how a middle-aged Dutch watchmaker became a heroine of the Resistance, a survivor of Hitler’s death camps, and one of the most remarkable evangelists of the twentieth century.


6. The Rifle: Combat Stories from America's Last WWII Veterans, Told Through an M1 Garand

Author: by Andrew Biggio
English
278 pages
1684510791

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It all started because of a rifle. The Rifle is an inspirational story and hero’s journey of a 28-year-old U.S. Marine, Andrew Biggio, who returned home from combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, full of questions about the price of war.

He found answers from those who survived the costliest war of all – WWII veterans. It began when Biggio bought a 1945 M1 Garand Rifle, the most common rifle used in WWII, to honor his great uncle, a U.S. Army soldier who died on the hills of the Italian countryside.

When Biggio showed the gun to his neighbor, WWII veteran Corporal Joseph Drago, it unlocked memories Drago had kept unspoken for 50 years. On the spur of the moment, Biggio asked Drago to sign the rifle. Thus began this Marine’s mission to find as many WWII veterans as he could, get their signatures on the rifle, and document their stories.

For two years, Biggio traveled across the country to interview America’s last-living WWII veterans. Each time he put the M1 Garand Rifle in their hands, their eyes lit up with memories triggered by holding the weapon that had been with them every step of the war.


7. The Diary of a Young Girl: The Definitive Edition

Author: by Anne Frank
Bantam
English
400 pages

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Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classica powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding.

For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the Secret Annex of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death.

In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short.


8. The Forgotten 500: The Untold Story of the Men Who Risked All for the Greatest Rescue Mission of World War II

Author: by Gregory A. Freeman
Dutton Caliber
English
336 pages

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The astonishing, never before told story of the greatest rescue mission of World War IIwhen the OSS set out to recover more than 500 airmen trapped behind enemy lines in Yugoslavia… During a bombing campaign over Romanian oil fields, hundreds of American airmen were shot down in Nazi-occupied Yugoslavia.

Local Serbian farmers and peasants risked their own lives to give refuge to the soldiers while they waited for rescue, and in 1944, Operation Halyard was born. The risks were incredible. The starving Americans in Yugoslavia had to construct a landing strip large enough for C-47 cargo planeswithout tools, without alerting the Germans, and without endangering the villagers.

And the cargo planes had to make it through enemy airspace and backwithout getting shot down themselves. Classified for over half a century for political reasons, the full account of this unforgettable story of loyalty, self-sacrifice, and bravery is now being told for the first time ever.

The Forgotten 500 is the gripping, behind-the-scenes look at the greatest escape of World War II. Amazing [and] riveting. James Bradley, New York Times bestselling author of Flags of Our Fathers


9. Presidents of War: The Epic Story, from 1807 to Modern Times

Author: by Michael R. Beschloss
B078QTY62K
Crown (October 9, 2018)
October 9, 2018

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From a preeminent presidential historian comes a superb and important (The New York Times Book Review) saga of America’s wartime chief executives Fascinating and heartbreaking …Timely … Beschloss’s broad scope lets you draw important crosscutting lessons about presidential leadership.

Bill Gates Widely acclaimed and ten years in the making, Michael Beschloss’s Presidents of War is an intimate and irresistibly readable chronicle of the Chief Executives who took the United States into conflict and mobilized it for victory. From the War of 1812 to Vietnam, we see these leaders considering the difficult decision to send hundreds of thousands of Americans to their deaths; struggling with Congress, the courts, the press, and antiwar protesters; seeking comfort from their spouses and friends; and dropping to their knees in prayer.

Through Beschloss’s interviews with surviving participants and findings in original letters and once-classified national security documents, we come to understand how these Presidents were able to withstand the pressures of waror were broken by them. Presidents of War combines this sense of immediacy with the overarching context of two centuries of American history, traveling from the time of our Founders, who tried to constrain presidential power, to our modern day, when a single leader has the potential to launch nuclear weapons that can destroy much of the human race.

10. The Happiest Man on Earth: The Beautiful Life of an Auschwitz Survivor

Author: by Eddie Jaku
Harper
English
208 pages

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A New York Times BestsellerIn this uplifting memoir in the vein of The Last Lecture and Man’s Search for Meaning, a Holocaust survivor pays tribute to those who were lost by telling his story, sharing his wisdom, and living his best possible life.

Born in Leipzig, Germany, into a Jewish family, Eddie Jaku was a teenager when his world was turned upside-down. On November 9, 1938, during the terrifying violence of Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, Eddie was beaten by SS thugs, arrested, and sent to a concentration camp with thousands of other Jews across Germany.

Every day of the next seven years of his life, Eddie faced unimaginable horrors in Buchenwald, Auschwitz, and finally on a forced death march during the Third Reich’s final days. The Nazis took everything from Eddiehis family, his friends, and his country.

But they did not break his spirit. Against unbelievable odds, Eddie found the will to survive. Overwhelming grateful, he made a promise: he would smile every day in thanks for the precious gift he was given and to honor the six million Jews murdered by Hitler.

12. With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

Author: by E. B. Sledge
English
352 pages
0891419063

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Eugene Sledge became more than a legend with his memoir, With The Old Breed. He became a chronicler, a historian, a storyteller who turns the extremes of the war in the Pacificthe terror, the camaraderie, the banal and the extraordinaryinto terms we mortals can grasp.

Tom HanksNEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERIn The Wall Street Journal, Victor Davis Hanson named With the Old Breed one of the top five books on epic twentieth-century battles. Studs Terkel interviewed the author for his definitive oral history, The Good War.Now E.B.

Sledge’s acclaimed first-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa returns to thrill, edify, and inspire a new generation. An Alabama boy steeped in American history and enamored of such heroes as George Washington and Daniel Boone, Eugene B. Sledge became part of the war’s famous 1st Marine Division3rd Battalion, 5th Marines.

Even after intense training, he was shocked to be thrown into the battle of Peleliu, where the world was a nightmare of flashes, explosions, and snapping bullets. By the time Sledge hit the hell of Okinawa, he was a combat vet, still filled with fear but no longer with panic.

13. Faustian Bargain: The Soviet-German Partnership and the Origins of the Second World War

Author: by Ian Ona Johnson
Oxford University Press
English
384 pages

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When Nazi Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, launching World War Two, its army seemed an unstoppable force. The Luftwaffe bombed towns and cities across the country, and fifty divisions of the Wehrmacht crossed the border. Yet only two decades earlier, at the end of World War One,Germany had been an utterly and abjectly defeated military power.

Foreign troops occupied its industrial heartland and the Treaty of Versailles reduced the vaunted German army of World War One to a fraction of its size, banning it from developing new military technologies. When Hitler came to powerin 1933, these strictures were still in effect.

By 1939, however, he had at his disposal a fighting force of 4. 2 million men, armed with the most advanced weapons in the world. How could this nearly miraculous turnaround have happened? The answer lies in Russia. Beginning in the years immediately after World War One and continuing for more than a decade, the German military and the Soviet Union-despite having been mortal enemies-entered into a partnership designed to overturn the order in Europe.

14. Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II

Author: by Anne R. Keene
Sports Publishing
English
408 pages

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In 1943, while the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals were winning pennants and meeting in that year’s World Series, one of the nation’s strongest baseball teams practiced on a skinned-out college field in the heart of North Carolina. Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky, and Johnny Sain were among a cadre of fighter-pilot cadets who wore the Cloudbuster Nine baseball jersey at an elite Navy training school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

In this spirited Field of Dreams-like father-daughter account, author Anne R. Keene opens with a story about her father, Jim Raugh, who suited up as the team batboy and mascot. He got to know his baseball heroes personally, watching players hit the road on cramped, tin-can buses, dazzling factory workers, kids, and service members at dozens of games, including a war-bond exhibition against Babe Ruth’s team at Yankee Stadium.

Jimmy followed his baseball dreams as a college All-American, but was crushed later in life by a failed major-league bid with the Detroit Tigers. He would have carried this story to his grave had Anne not discovered his scrapbook from a Navy school that shaped America’s greatest heroes including George H.W.

15. About Face: The Odyssey of an American Warrior

Author: by Col. David H. Hackworth
English
912 pages
1982144041

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Called everything a war memoir could possibly be by The New York Times, this all-time classic of the military memoir genre now includes a new forward from bestselling author and retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink. Whether he was fifteen years old or forty, David Hackworth devoted his life to the US Army and quickly became a living legend.

However, he appeared on TV in 1971 to decry the doomed war effort in Vietnam. From Korea to Berlin and the Cuban missile crisis to Vietnam, Hackworth’s story is that of an exemplary patriot, played against the backdrop of the changing fortunes of America and the US military.

This memoir is the stunning indictment of the Pentagon’s fundamental misunderstanding of the Vietnam conflict and of the bureaucracy of self-interest that fueled the war. With About Face, Hackworth has written what many Vietnam veterans have called the most important book of their generation and presents a vivid and powerful portrait of patriotism.

16. Forgotten: The Untold Story of D-Day's Black Heroes, at Home and at War

Author: by Linda Hervieux
Harper Paperbacks
English
384 pages

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The injustices of 1940s Jim Crow America are brought to life in this extraordinary blend of military and social historya story that pays tribute to the valor of an all-black battalion whose crucial contributions at D-Day have gone unrecognized to this day.

In the early hours of June 6, 1944, the 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, a unit of African-American soldiers, landed on the beaches of France. Their orders were to man a curtain of armed balloons meant to deter enemy aircraft. One member of the 320th would be nominated for the Medal of Honor, an award he would never receive.

The nation’s highest decoration was not given to black soldiers in World War II. Drawing on newly uncovered military records and dozens of original interviews with surviving members of the 320th and their families, Linda Hervieux tells the story of these heroic men charged with an extraordinary mission, whose contributions to one of the most celebrated events in modern history have been overlooked.