Best Zimbabwe History Books

Here you will get Best Zimbabwe History Books For you.This is an up-to-date list of recommended books.

1. Three Sips of Gin: Dominating the Battlespace with Rhodesia's famed Selous Scouts

Author: by Timothy Bax
B00IRHB1FQ
Helion and Company
August 19, 2013

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There is nothing that terrorized Russian and Chinese-backed guerillas fighting Rhodesia’s bush war in the 1970s more than the famed Selous Scouts. The very name of the unit struck fear into the very heart and soul of even the most battle-hardened guerillas.

Too afraid to even whisper the name amongst themselves, they referred to soldiers of the unit simply as Skuzapu, or pickpockets. It was not for nothing that history has recorded the Selous Scouts Regiment as being one of the deadliest and most effective killing machines in modern counter-insurgency warfare.

The Selous Scouts comprised specially selected black and white soldiers of the Rhodesian army, supplemented with the inclusion of hardcore terrorists captured on the battlefield. Dressed and equipped as communist guerrillas and with faces and arms blackened, members of this elite Special Forces unit would slip silently into the shadows of the night to seek and destroy real terrorist gangs.

It became a deadly game of hide-and-seek played out between gangs and counter-gangs in the harsh and unforgiving landscape of the African bush. So successful were the Selous Scouts at being able to locate and destroy terrorist in their lairs that by the mid-1970s, they had begun to dominate Rhodesia’s battle space.


2. Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood

Author: by Alexandra Fuller
English
336 pages
0375758992

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A worthy heir to Isak Dinesen and Beryl Markham, Alexandra Fuller shares visceral memories of her childhood in Africa, and of her headstrong, unforgettable mother. This is not a book you read just once, but a tale of terrible beauty to get lost in over and over.

Newsweek By turns mischievous and openhearted, earthy and soaring … Hair-raising, horrific, and thrilling. The New Yorker Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate.

Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time. From 1972 to 1990, Alexandra Fullerknown to friends and family as Bobogrew up on several farms in southern and central Africa.


3. We Dared to Win: The SAS in Rhodesia

Author: by Hannes Wessels
B07FKS6FC7
Casemate (April 19, 2018)

April 19, 2018

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A memoir from a Special Forces fighter about his experiences in the Rhodesian War and how combat has shaped his life. Andre Scheepers grew up on a farm in Rhodesia, learning about the bush from his African childhood friends, before joining the army.

A quiet, introspective thinker, Andre started out as a trooper in the SAS before being commissioned into the Rhodesian Light Infantry Commandos, where he was engaged in fireforce combat operations. He then rejoined the SAS. Wounded thirteen times, his operational record is exceptional, even by the tough standards that existed at the time.

He emerged as the SAS officer par excellencebeloved by his men, displaying extraordinary calm, courage, and audacious cunning during a host of extremely dangerous operations. Here, Andre writes vividly about his experiences, his emotions, and his state of mind during the war, and reflects candidly on what he learned and how war has shaped his life since.

In addition to Andre’s personal story, this book reveals more about some of the other men who were distinguished operators in SAS operations during the Rhodesian War. Andre was the best of the best and the bravest of the brave.


4. A Handful of Hard Men: The SAS and the Battle for Rhodesia

Author: by Hannes Wessels
Casemate
English
304 pages

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During the West’s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance. During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhodesian SAS, who placed himself at the tip of the spear in the deadly battle to resist the forces of Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo.

It is difficult to find another soldier’s story to equal Watt’s in terms of time spent on the field of battle and challenges faced. Even by the lofty standards of the SAS and Special Forces, one has to look far to find anyone who can match his record of resilience and valor in the face of such daunting odds and with resources so paltry.

In the fight he showed himself to be a military maestro. A bush-lore genius, blessed with uncanny instincts and an unbridled determination to close with the enemy, he had no peers as a combat-tracker (and there was plenty of competition).


5. Ancient African Kingdoms: A Captivating Guide to Civilizations of Ancient Africa Such as the Land of Punt, Carthage, the Kingdom of Aksum, the Mali Empire, and the Kingdom of Kush

Author: by Captivating History
English
220 pages
1647489245

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If you want to discover the captivating history of ancient Africa and the Kingdom of Kush, then keep reading… Two captivating manuscripts in one book:Ancient Africa: A Captivating Guide to Ancient African Civilizations, Such as the Kingdom of Kush, the Land of Punt, Carthage, the Kingdom of Aksum, and the Mali Empire with its TimbuktuThe Kingdom of Kush: A Captivating Guide to an Ancient African Kingdom in Nubia That Once Ruled EgyptAfrica is the continent where the first humans were born.

They explored the vast land and produced the first tools. And although we migrated from that continent, we never completely abandoned it. From the beginning of time, humans lived and worked in Africa, leaving evidence of their existence in the sands of the Sahara Desert and the valleys of the great rivers, such as the Nile and Niger.

Some of the earliest great civilizations were born there, and they give us an insight into the smaller kingdoms of ancient Africa. Egypt is the main source of knowledge of many neighboring kingdoms that were just as rich and developed.


6. When Money Destroys Nations: How Hyperinflation Ruined Zimbabwe, How Ordinary People Survived, and Warnings for Nations that Print Money

Author: by Philip Haslam
English
258 pages
0620590033

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Since the global financial crisis of 2008, the major governments of the world have resorted to printing vast sums of money to pay national debts and bail out banks. The warning signs are clear, and the collapse of the Zimbabwean dollar in 2009 after years of rampant money printing is a frightening example of what lies in store for the world’s economies if painful, but necessary, reform is not enacted soon.

When Money Destroys Nations tells the gripping story of the disintegration of the once-thriving Zimbabwean economy and how ordinary people survived in turbulent circumstances. Analysing this case within a global context, Philip Haslam and Russell Lamberti investigate the causes of hyperinflation and draw ominous parallels between Zimbabwe and the world’s developed economies.

The looming currency crises and possible hyperinflation in these major economies, particularly the United States, have the potential to turn the current world order upside down. Zimbabwe’s lessons must not be ignored. This is the story of When Money Destroys Nations.


7. Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness

Author: by Alexandra Fuller
Penguin Books
English
256 pages

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Fuller brings Africa to life, both its natural splendor and the harsher realities of day-to-day existence, and sheds light on her parents in all their humannessnot a glaring sort of light, but the soft equatorial kind she so beautifully describes in this memoir.

BookpageA story of survival and war, love and madness, loyalty and forgiveness, Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness is an intimate exploration of Fuller’s parents, whom readers first met in Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, and of the price of being possessed by Africa’s uncompromising, fertile, death-dealing land.

We follow Tim and Nicola Fuller hopscotching the continent, restlessly trying to establish a home. War, hardship, and tragedy follow the family even as Nicola fights to hold on to her children, her land, her sanity. But just when it seems that Nicola has been broken by the continent she loves, it is the African earth that revives and nurtures her.

Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness is Fuller at her very best. Alexandra Fuller is the author of several memoirs: Travel Light, Move Fast, Leaving Before the Rains Come and Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight.


8. Bush War Operator: Memoirs of the Rhodesian Light Infantry, Selous Scouts and beyond

Author: by Andrew Balaam
Helion and Company
English
288 pages

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From the searing heat of the Zambezi Valley to the freezing cold of the Chimanimani Mountains in Rhodesia, from the bars in Port St Johns in the Transkei to the Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa, this is the story of one man’s fight against terror, and his conscience.

Anyone living in Rhodesia during the 1960s and 1970s would have had a father, husband, brother or son called up in the defense of the war-torn, landlocked little country. A few of these brave men would have been members of the elite and secretive unit that struck terror into the hearts of the ZANLA and ZIPRA guerrillas infiltrating the country at that time – the Selous Scouts.

These men were highly trained and disciplined, with skills to rival the SAS, Navy Seals and the US Marines, although their dress and appearance were wildly unconventional: civilian clothing with blackened, hairy faces to resemble the very people they were fighting against.

Twice decorated – with the Member of the Legion of Merit (MLM) and the Military Forces’ Commendation (MFC) – Andrew Balaam was a member of the Rhodesian Light Infantry and later the Selous Scouts, for a period spanning twelve years.


9. When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa

Author: by Peter Godwin
Back Bay Books
English
341 pages

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After his father’s heart attack in 1984, Peter Godwin began a series of pilgrimages back to Zimbabwe, the land of his birth, from Manhattan, where he now lives. On these frequent visits to check on his elderly parents, he bore witness to Zimbabwe’s dramatic spiral downwards into the jaws of violent chaos, presided over by an increasingly enraged dictator.

And yet long after their comfortable lifestyle had been shattered and millions were fleeing, his parents refuse to leave, steadfast in their allegiance to the failed state that has been their adopted home for 50 years. Then Godwin discovered a shocking family secret that helped explain their loyalty.

Africa was his father’s sanctuary from another identity, another world. When a Crocodile Eats the Sun is a stirring memoir of the disintegration of a family set against the collapse of a country. But it is also a vivid portrait of the profound strength of the human spirit and the enduring power of love.

10. African Kingdoms: An Encyclopedia of Empires and Civilizations

Author: by Saheed Aderinto
ABC-CLIO (August 24, 2017)
English
363 pages

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Africa has a long and fascinating history and is a place of growing importance in the world history curriculum. This detailed encyclopedia covers the history of African kingdoms from antiquity through the mid-19th century, tracing the dynasties’ ties to modern globalization and influences on world culture before, during, and after the demise of the slave trade.

Along with an exploration of African heritage, this reference is rich with firsthand accounts of Africa through the oral traditions of its people and the written journals of European explorers, missionaries, and travelers who visited Africa from the 15th century and onward.

Alphabetically arranged entries cover a particular kingdom and feature information on the economic, cultural, religious, political, social, and environmental history of the regime. The content references popular culture, movies, and art that present contemporary reenactments of kingdoms, emphasizing the importance of history in shaping modern ideas.

11. Beyond No Mean Soldier: The Explosive Recollections of a Former Special Forces Operator

Author: by Peter McAleese
B01IR0OQA4
Helion and Company
July 19, 2015

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Peter McAleese needs little introduction… His classic book “No Mean Soldier” was an immediate bestseller and set the bar for the modern military memoir. Few have since met its match. This completely revised and expanded edition sees a philosophical McAleese revisiting his time with Britain’s Parachute Regiment, the SAS, Rhodesia’s SAS and the South African Defense Force’s 44 Para Brigade.

Oh, and a few other adventures in and between – Colombia, private military companies and near fatal skydiving accidents; mercenary, soldier of fortune or flawed ideologist? Now’s your time to consider this and more – as has McAleese himself. It’s a compelling read – and with the addition of previously unpublished photos from McAleese’s private collection, there’s no other way to describe it.

“Beyond No Mean Soldier” does exactly that, going deep and further beyond the experience of “No Mean Soldier”. Over many months and into the early hours, McAleese reflected on his wide and expansive experiences – the men he’s served with and the operations he’d conducted.

12. The Fate of Africa: A History of the Continent Since Independence

Author: by Martin Meredith
PublicAffairs
English
816 pages

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The definitive story of African nations after they emerged from colonialism – from Mugabe’s doomed kleptocracy to Mandela’s inspiring defeat of apartheid. The Fate of Africa has been hailed by reviewers as “A masterpiece…. The nonfiction book of the year” (The New York Post); “a magnificent achievement” (Weekly Standard); “a joy,” (Wall Street Journal) and “one of the decade’s most important works on Africa” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

Spanning the full breadth of the continent, from the bloody revolt in Algiers against the French to Zimbabwe’s civil war, Martin Meredith’s classic history focuses on the key personalities, events and themes of the independence era, and explains the myriad problems that Africa has faced in the past half-century.

It covers recent events like the ongoing conflict in Sudan, the controversy over Western aid, the exploitation of Africa’s resources, and the growing importance and influence of China.

13. Selous Scouts: Rhodesian Counter-Insurgency Specialists ([email protected])

Author: by Peter Baxter
Helion and Company
English
80 pages

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“Its members consisted of some of the finest guerrilla-fighting men in the western world, unconventional in many ways, disregardful of parade-ground discipline, unorthodox in their dress, yet a force so tightly knit in the face of danger that those who knew anything about them could only marvel” – The Citizen.

Formed in 1973 by the legendary Lieutenant-Colonel Ron Reid-Daly at the behest of Rhodesian military supremo General Peter Walls, the Selous Scouts were to write their name into the annals of military history as one of the finest counterinsurgency units of all time, through their innovative pseudo-guerrilla tactics, brilliant reconnaissance operations into Zambia and Botswana and daring flying-column raids into Mozambique.

Feared and hated by the liberation movements ZIPRA and ZANLA, the Scouts wreaked untold havoc and destruction on their Soviet- and Chinese-backed enemies, accounting for 68% of guerrilla casualties within Rhodesia alone during the bitter bush war of the 1970s. Uniquely ahead of its time, the regimen – a brotherhood of men that traversed cultural and racial barriers; their Shona motto was ‘Pamwe Chete’ (together only) – was to produce the type of soldier that earned for the unit one Grand Cross of Valour, nine Silver Crosses and 22 Bronze Crosses of Rhodesia.

14. The Rhodesian War: A Military History (Stackpole Military History Series)

Author: by Paul L. Moorcraft
Stackpole Books
English
228 pages

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The vicious conflict (1964-79) that brought Robert Mugabe to power in Zimbabwe Expert coverage of the war, its historical context, and its aftermath Descriptions of guerrilla warfare, counterinsurgency operations, and actions by units like Grey’s Scouts Amid the colonial upheaval of the 1960s, Britain urged its colony in Southern Rhodesia (modern-day Zimbabwe) to grant its black residents a greater role in governing the territory.

The white-minority government refused and soon declared its independence, a move bitterly opposed by the black majority. The result was the Rhodesian Bush War, which pitted the government against black nationalist groups, one of which was led by Robert Mugabe.

Marked by unspeakable atrocities, the war ended in favor of the nationalists.

15. Bitter Harvest: Zimbabwe and the Aftermath of its Independence

Author: by Ian Smith
B0078X0YBW
John Blake (May 5, 2008)
May 5, 2008

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In July 2007, Zimbabwe’s worsening economy saw inflation skyrocket to 7,634 per cent, deepening the already chronic food shortages in a country where only one in five of the adult population is in employment. Months later, on 20 November 2007, Ian Smith, the former Prime Minister of Rhodesia died, leaving behind him a lifetime of resistance to black majority rule and the dangers that he believed it would bring to his country.

Ian Smith was a man with the ability to excite powerful emotions in all who heard his name. To those who still revere his memory he was a hero, a mighty leader, a man whose formidable integrity led him into head-to-head confrontation with the Labour Government of Britain in the 1960s.

To others, he was, and remains, a demon, a reactionary whose intransigence long delayed majority rule in an important corner of Africa. The last decades of the twentieth century and the first years of the new millennium have seen Zimbabwe spiral into a chaos of violence and towards the brink of economic collapse, prompting many to reappraise Smith’s role and the prescience of his actions.

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The Shackled Continent: Power, Corruption, and African Lives

Author: by Robert Guest
B0045EO706
October 5, 2010
English

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A former Africa editor for The Economist, Robert Guest addresses the troubled continent’s thorniest problems: war, AIDS, and above all, poverty. Newly updated with a preface that considers political and economic developments of the past six years, The Shackled Continentis engrossing, highly readable, and as entertaining as it is tragic.

Guest pulls the veil off the corruption and intrigue that cripple so many African nations, posing a provocative theory that Africans have been impoverished largely by their own leaders’ abuses of power. From the minefields of Angola to the barren wheat fields of Zimbabwe, Guest gathers startling evidence of the misery African leaders have inflicted on their people.

But he finds elusive success stories and examples of the resilience and resourcefulness of individual Africans, too; from these, he draws hope that the continent will eventually prosper. Guest offers choices both commonsense and controversial for Africans and for those in the West who wish Africa well.